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Updated: 2 hours 16 min ago

IOM Provides Mental Health Services and Safe Spaces for Vulnerable Yemeni Families

10 hours 31 min ago

Sana’a – The conflict in Yemen – raging since March 2015 and recently intensified by clashes in and around Al-Hudaydah over the weekend – has disrupted the lives of millions of Yemenis. Nearly ten per cent of the population, or 2.3 million people, are displaced as of June, according to the UN Migration Agency’s (IOM) Displacement Tracking Matrix.

The devastation of essential infrastructure has exacerbated struggles faced by the Yemeni population to find livelihood opportunities and provide for their families. As a result, an estimated 22 million Yemenis are in need of humanitarian assistance and almost 18 million are food insecure, according to the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs.

The protracted conflict and subsequent displacement has also halted the education of nearly two million children, that the Ministry of Education  and UNICEF estimate, are not attending school. Recognising the need for children to have a safe place to play, IOM has established 31 Child Friendly Spaces in Yemen.

IOM safe spaces allow children a respite from conflict – a place to play, learn and regain a sense of normalcy. Children participate in a variety of activities including games, artwork, puppet theatre, and storytelling. More than 170,000 girls and 230,000 boys have been served in centres operating in Aden and Sana’a to date.

Since March 2016, IOM has provided community based psychosocial support to nearly 400,000 children that utilize these spaces. More than half of these children have been displaced from their homes and live in informal sites throughout the country.

According to Anwar Al- Shami from IOM Yemen, “Our teams have learned of several incidents of child suicide, sexual and labour exploitation, family separation and recruitment since the war broke out in Yemen. We are striving to provide a safe place where children and families feel supported.”  

IOM staff psychologists have provided more than 100,000 psychosocial consultations for children and their guardians the CFSs since 2016. IOM also provides MHPSS in 61 health facilities across the country.

Mental Health and Psychosocial programming (MHPSS) is part of IOM’s integrated multisector humanitarian response inside Yemen. IOM also provides shelter, health, water and sanitation and displacement tracking and site level support to displaced and vulnerable Yemeni communities.

For more information, please contact Angela Wells, IOM Public Information Officer for the Department of Operations and Emergencies, Tel: +41 79 403 53 65, Email: awells@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, November 13, 2018 - 15:37Image: Region-Country: YemenThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesMigration HealthDefault: Multimedia: 

Since March 2016, IOM has provided community based psychosocial support to nearly 400,000 Yemeni children in child friendly spaces. Photo: Eman Al Awami

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

IOM Presents Study Findings on Ethiopian Diaspora Mapping in the United States

10 hours 42 min ago

Addis Ababa – The UN Migration Agency (IOM), in collaboration with the Ethiopian Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MoFA) and the Federal and Regional Diaspora Affairs Coordination Offices, presented the findings of a study on the mapping of Ethiopian Diasporas in the USA. During a two-day workshop (5-6 November) held in Addis Ababa, an assessment of skills or knowledge gaps and investment opportunities within Ethiopia was also presented.

The study of sample populations of the Ethiopian Diaspora based in Virginia, Maryland, and Washington, District of Columbia (DC), indicated that the mobilized diaspora possesses substantial and diverse human capital, robust middle-class income levels and some limited available wealth for investment. The mobilized diaspora is also particularly interested in contribution to and investment in the education, healthcare and agriculture sectors, as well Ethiopia’s general infrastructure and business-enabling environment. Most Ethiopian diaspora members are motivated by a combination of emotional and financial investment concerns.

However, diaspora engagement is currently impeded by numerous perceived obstacles to investment, particularly issues related to government policy and practice; financial concerns; and some local human capital challenges. Despite these challenges, the study indicated that there is a significant level of engagement with Ethiopia through remittances, investments and charitable donations. In the past three years, over half (56%) of respondents have sent remittances annually to friends and/or family members in Ethiopia. On average, respondents sent USD 6,998 in remittances to Ethiopia annually over the past three years.

The Government of Ethiopia (GoE) has always been keen to engage the Ethiopian diaspora in developing the country and has requested IOM, a leading UN organization in the field of migration, to provide support by formulating and implementing diaspora mapping exercises.

The study’s primary objective was to assess knowledge and skills gaps in Ethiopia’s health and education systems, and also indicate investment opportunities for Ethiopian diaspora in these two sectors. The project covered selected teaching hospitals and universities located in four regional states – Tigray, Amhara, Oromia, and Southern Nations, Nationalities and Peoples – as well as one administrative city (Addis Ababa).

Fifty-six participants from the MoFA, IOM, the Ethiopian Diaspora Trust Fund Advisory Council, Commercial Bank of Ethiopia, relevant ministries and various Ethiopian diaspora associations attended the presentation of the study.

Following the diaspora mapping assessment, a roadmap for short-term and long-term knowledge and skill transfer programmes will be developed. Programme introduction and diaspora mobilization workshops have also been conducted with embassies, diaspora associations as well as professional and business networks to encourage diaspora members to take part in the process as well.

For more information, please contact Alemayehu Seifeselassie at IOM Addis Ababa, Tel: +251 911 63 90 82, Email: salemayehu@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, November 13, 2018 - 15:00Image: Region-Country: EthiopiaThemes: Migration ResearchMigration and DevelopmentDefault: Multimedia: 

Moonga Malambo from IOM Ethiopia’s Migration Management Unit giving opening remarks as the Diaspora Mapping Study is presented in Addis Ababa.

Gillian Williams presenting the findings of the Diaspora Mapping Study in Addis Ababa.

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Bangladesh’s Largest Job Site, UN Migration Agency Partner to Combat Unethical Recruitment Practices

12 hours 26 min ago

Dhaka – The UN Migration Agency (IOM) is partnering with Bangladesh’s largest online job portal Bdjobs.com Ltd. to provide the latest information to job seekers on overseas employment opportunities and connect them directly with employers. The two agencies on Sunday (11/11) signed a Memorandum of Understanding to create a new online portal that expects to go live within six months.

In Bangladesh, every year nearly two million people join the working age population, while only 200,000 jobs are created locally. This phenomenon, coupled with pull factors – including peer influence, expectations of higher income and the perceived social status attached to living abroad – often lead working age people to migrate for jobs overseas.

But prospective migrants frequently find themselves misled by middlemen when it comes to signing to contracts and confronting working and living conditions different from what they were promised in some destination countries. Some job seekers even become victims of human trafficking and end up facing extreme exploitation and abuse.

IOM has been working closely with the Government of Bangladesh, recruiting agencies as well as with public and private stakeholders to reduce the vulnerability of job-seeking migrants during their journeys. For a decade, IOM has promoted a rights-based approach and integration of migration into Bangladesh’s national development agenda.

“Overseas opportunities, job requirements and the terms and conditions of their employment are the bare minimum that migrants should know to make conscious choices,” said IOM Bangladesh Chief of Mission Giorgi Gigauri. “It is their basic right and it is very important that stakeholders go beyond business as usual and play a responsible role in protecting migrant workers.”

“Credible information platforms need to become more accessible, not only to potential migrants, but also migrants living abroad and those willing to re-migrate,” he added.

“The changing market dynamics are driving us to focus more on technical jobs, which are filled by a large number of migrant workers,” said Bdjobs.com CEO AKM Fahim Mashroor. “We believe this initiative will definitely help migrant workers to get more accurate and timely job information for safe and regular migration.”

The new online job portal, which will be developed with support from the IOM Development Fund, will have some unique features particularly designed for Bangladeshi migrant workers.

The android app will offer Bangla/English language preferences and will allow jobseekers to create profiles with information required by the Bangladesh Bureau of Manpower Employment and Training (BMET) – the agency responsible for authorizing work permits for Bangladeshi migrants.

Profiles will also be integrated with a search engine through which government, foreign missions, employers and recruiting agencies will be able to identify suitable candidates.

For more information please contact Chowdhury Asif Mahmud Bin Harun at IOM Bangladesh, Email: mbinharun@iom.int, Tel. +880 1755509476.

Language English Posted: Tuesday, November 13, 2018 - 15:45Image: Region-Country: BangladeshThemes: Labour MigrationDefault: Multimedia: 

IOM and Bdjobs.com officials sign a Memorandum of Understanding to better inform overseas job seekers. Photo: IOM

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

IOM Releases Redesigned, Now Customizable Mobile App ‘MigApp’ in 4 New Languages

12 hours 26 min ago

Geneva – The redesigned MigApp – the UN Migration Agency’s app for migrants – is available today (13/11) for download. The app’s interface has been reconfigured to include a dropdown menu and more user-accessible icons.

Additionally, MigApp 3.0 comes in four more languages – Chinese, Italian, Russian and Portuguese – bringing the total number of available languages to eight, including the original English, Arabic, French and Spanish.

MigApp is designed to help migrants make informed decisions during their journeys by simplifying access to secure and reliable migration-related information and services. The app also contains select UN Migration Agency (IOM) programmes, allowing the Organization to reach more migrants by leveraging the latest mobile technology. This new release merges MigApp with the MigrantApp, an IOM mobile app previously available in Mesoamerica.

“We are very excited about the introduction of MigApp to Mesoamerica and South America. This launch is a result of the strong collaboration and partnership between the Information and Communications Technology Division and the regional office in Costa Rica and country missions throughout Mesoamerica,” said Marietta Muwanga-Ssevume, IOM Chief Information Officer. “The teams worked very hard to combine the regional contextual information and services provided by the MigrantApp with the thematic information from MigApp to provide a greatly enhanced product.”

One highlight of this new release is the addition of contact information for over 1,700 services – under headings such as immigration and consular offices, human trafficking assistance and medical centres. Users can select up to five countries when accessing this information offline.

Migrants are now able to customize a page with their favourite MigApp feature and by country of interest. Other additions include migration tips, migration services and local news.

On the services side of the app, information about IOM’s Assisted Voluntary Return and Reintegration (AVRR) programme now covers Bulgaria, Germany, Mozambique and Switzerland, in addition to Belgium, Egypt, Greece, Ireland, the Netherlands and Turkey, and other countries previously featured on the MigrantApp (El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Mexico).

MigApp contributes to IOM’s efforts to support Member States in fulfilling three Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

  • End modern slavery and human trafficking (SDG 8.7). MigApp’s Global Counter Trafficking Hotlines contains contact information for over 2,800 counter-trafficking hotlines worldwide;
  • Reduce transaction costs of migrant remittances (SDG 10.C). MigApp’s Money Transfer feature lists the best exchange rates available, rewarding services with the lowest rates; and
  • Facilitate orderly, safe, regular and responsible migration (SDG 10.C). All of MigApp’s features provide information and services working toward this objective.

The first version of MigApp was released on 18 December 2017 as part of IOM’s transition to digital mobility. Mobile applications have created a new avenue of communication with migrants and new tools for IOM staff to conduct their work in remote areas.
MigApp was developed thanks to financial support from the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC), and the version 3.0 improvements thanks to the United States Department of State and the IOM Development Fund.

Download MigApp for Android or iOS.

For more information, please contact Alex Dougan at IOM HQ, Tel: +41 22 717 9352, Email: adougan@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, November 13, 2018 - 15:40Image: Region-Country: SwitzerlandThemes: Migrant AssistanceDefault: Multimedia: 

MigApp 3.0 is now available on the App Store and Google Play. Photo: IOM

MigApp’s redesigned interface. Photo: IOM

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Myanmar Overseas Employment Agencies Explore Pathways to More Ethical Recruitment

12 hours 29 min ago

Yangon – The UN Migration Agency (IOM) is hosting an introductory workshop on ethical recruitment standards and the International Recruitment Integrity System (IRIS) certification process for 25 private recruitment agency members of the Myanmar Overseas Employment Agencies Federation (MOEAF) and staff of Myanmar’s Ministry of Labour, Immigration and Population.

The two-day event in Yangon, (12-13 November), aims to increase the recruiters’ understanding of the steps towards an ethical recruitment business model, and to provide practical information on what recruiters need to demonstrate in their management systems to become IRIS-certified.

The Government of Myanmar estimates that some 4.25 million Myanmar nationals are living abroad. Of these, 89 per cent leave Myanmar in search of work – primarily in neighbouring Thailand. Migrant workers are particularly vulnerable to exploitation.

On their journey they can be exploited by unscrupulous brokers who may charge excessive fees for their services, provide misleading information about jobs offered, or withhold migrants’ identification documents. At their workplace, migrants may be subject to abuse, forced labour or long working hours for little or no pay.

 U Win Shein, Director General of the Department of Labour under the Ministry of Labour, Immigration and Population encouraged workshop participants to seek practical ways to comply with IRIS standards and improve migration for Myanmar nationals.

“We take pride in having the opportunity to conduct this workshop to promote ethical recruitment practices, which would benefit not only our recruitment industry and my Ministry, but also the whole of Myanmar,” he said.

“I believe that participants will better understand the risks and challenges of the current recruitment model and recognize how moving towards ethical practices can lead to better results,” said U Peter Nyunt Maung, Chairman of the MOEAF.

IRIS is a global social compliance scheme developed by IOM and a coalition of like-minded partners from government, civil society and the private sector to promote ethical international labour recruitment, which includes ensuring that employers, rather than workers, pay all recruitment fees.

IRIS, which sets a benchmark for ethical recruitment, is currently piloting a voluntary certification system for ethical labour recruiters that will help identify and support ethical international recruiters in global markets. For businesses and migrant workers, IRIS will serve as a due diligence tool for the assessment of labour recruiters.

By adopting the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration in December 2018, governments worldwide will commit to review existing recruitment mechanisms to guarantee that they are fair and ethical, including by taking into consideration the IRIS framework.

IOM Myanmar Chief of Mission Akio Nakayama recognized the government and other partners in Myanmar for their close cooperation in the field of labour migration. “We stand ready to continue our support to Myanmar to harness the benefits of migration through a whole-of-government and a whole-of-society approach,” he said.

At a time when companies and brands are increasingly under scrutiny by consumers and governments on their business practices and treatment of workers in direct operations and supply chains, it is important for international recruitment agencies to be prepared to meet changing employer demands.

The IRIS workshop was designed to enable the recruiters to provide services that proactively and effectively protect and uphold the rights of migrant workers throughout the international recruitment process. 

The event was supported by the Swiss Development Cooperation (SDC)-funded regional project: Poverty Reduction through Safe Migration, Skills Development and Enhanced Job Placement (PROMISE), implemented by IOM in Thailand, Myanmar, Cambodia and the Lao People’s Democratic Republic.

PROMISE promotes better employment opportunities and working conditions for migrants, especially women from Myanmar, Cambodia and the Lao People’s Democratic Republic, through skills development and safe migration in partnership with the private sector, training institutions, civil society and government stakeholders. SDC also supports the development of IRIS at the global level.

For more information please contact Akio Nakayama at IOM Myanmar. Tel. +95 1523509, Email: anakayama@iom.int.

Language English Posted: Tuesday, November 13, 2018 - 15:35Image: Region-Country: MyanmarThemes: Labour MigrationDefault: Multimedia: 

Myanmar recruitment specialists meet in Yangon to discuss ethical recruitment and the International Recruitment Integrity System (IRIS) certification process. Photo: IOM

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Nigeria: Migrant Resource Centres Instrumental in Reducing Irregular Migration

12 hours 29 min ago

Lagos – “Most migrants would not have travelled in the first place if they were properly informed. With migrant resource centres (MRC), the incidence of irregular migration will be reduced to its barest minimum,” said Blessing Anefu, one of 30 participants at a recent follow-up training on effective management of MRCs. “This training is critical in equipping us with required skills needed to achieve the objective of the centre.”

The three-day training (6-8 November) was organized by IOM, the UN Migration Agency, in collaboration with the Nigerian Federal Ministry of Labour and Employment. It was designed to strengthen the capacity of relevant government officials, particularly newly recruited staff, to better understand their role in helping potential and returning migrants make informed decisions about their travel and reintegration plans.

The training, which was funded by the European Union under the EU-IOM Joint Initiative for Migrant Protection and Reintegration, hosted 16 male and 14 female participants from Lagos, Abuja and Edo States MRCs. 

“To achieve the laudable objectives for which the MRCs were established in Nigeria, competent human resources capable of providing services to potential and returning migrants are essential to enable migrants to make informed decisions about their migratory ambitions,” said Mienye Badejo, representing the Federal Ministry of Labour and Employment, in her welcome remarks. “This will minimize the risks associated with migration and maximize the benefits of organized labour migration to national development.”

IOM helped over 10,000 Nigerian migrants stranded in Libya and other countries return to Nigeria between April 2017 and October 2018. Most of these migrants embarked on their perilous journeys with little or no information about regular migration processes, the risks inherent in irregular migration, the living and working conditions abroad or the support and redress services available at destination countries.

The establishment of the MRCs in Abuja, Lagos and Edo States by IOM is an initiative which supports government’s efforts in managing organized labour migration by providing services that will enable potential and actual migrants to protect themselves while also empowering them to contribute to sustainable development.

In October 2018, the MRC in Edo State provided reintegration, job advisory and counselling assistance to a total of 648 beneficiaries (462 male and 186 female); 20 per cent of them are between 16 and 30 years old while 80 per cent are in the 31-45 age range.

Abrham Tamrat, IOM Nigeria Programme Manager and Head of Sub-Office, affirmed the importance of MRCs in the overall integration prospects of migrants: “It helps improve the migrants’ knowledge of the destination country and ensure that their expectations about the migration process are realistic.”

The programme is part of the larger EU-IOM Joint Initiative for Migrant Protection and Reintegration which facilitates orderly, safe, regular and responsible migration management through the development of rights-based and development-focused policies and processes on protection and sustainable reintegration. The EU-IOM Joint Initiative, backed by the EU Trust Fund, covers and has been set up in close cooperation with a total of 26 African countries.

For more information please contact Jorge Galindo at IOM Nigeria, Tel: +234 906 273 9168, Email: jgalindo@iom.int 

Language English Posted: Tuesday, November 13, 2018 - 15:30Image: Region-Country: NigeriaThemes: Capacity BuildingMigrant AssistanceDefault: Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Winners of IOM, UNCTAD, WIPO Competition Arrive in Switzerland for Global Entrepreneurship Week

12 hours 30 min ago

Geneva – Global Entrepreneurship Week (GEW) is an international initiative that introduces entrepreneurship to young people from around the world; the 2018 edition kicked off yesterday (12/11).

This year IOM, the UN Migration Agency, joined forces with the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) and partners to organize a youth entrepreneurship event for GEW called Start and Scale-up for SDGs.

In August 2018, the organizations invited young entrepreneurs from around the world to pitch business ideas that contribute to at least one of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). IOM encouraged applications from young entrepreneurs with migrant or diaspora backgrounds, including returning migrants, as well as businesses or business ideas which partner with migrants.

Out of a total of 10 young entrepreneurs selected to visit Geneva during GEW, two candidates – Khaled Karri and Astride Adjinacou – had business models linked to a migration or diaspora experience.

Khaled Karri founded the Hummustown Cooperative. Hummustown was set up in Rome in 2017 to provide local communities with authentic Syrian cuisine. The business has helped migrant employees, all of whom are Syrian refugees, become financially independent and integrate into Italian society. It also builds partnerships with Italian businesses and social organizations.

Astride Adjinacou is a migrant entrepreneur who lives in Algeria and plans to start her business in Benin’s agricultural sector. Her business plan focuses on developing a cooperative called Vegetable of Hope, which will grow organic crops using sustainable techniques and monitored irrigation. Astrid plans to sell her produce to grocery stores, vegetable markets, and restaurants. Her venture will provide job opportunities for youth, women, returning migrants in rural areas, thereby contributing to the development of the local economy.

“Entrepreneurs are the change-makers,” said Adjinacou, speaking ahead of the event. “We need to work hard and persevere. At GEW 2018, it's time to get inspired and motivated!”

Since yesterday, the candidates have been taking part in a series of activities designed to improve their entrepreneurial mindset and resilience, gauge their investment readiness and prepare to pitch their business ideas and plans to a panel of experts.

During Start and Scale-up for SDGs, which will take place this Thursday (15/11), the selected candidates will showcase their business ideas to impact investors and sustainable finance partners. Experts will then provide comprehensive feedback on the submissions, and how businesses can promote sustainable and inclusive growth through entrepreneurship in line with the UN Agenda on Sustainable Development.

Geneva Entrepreneurship Week will run until 16 November.

For more information please contact IOM HQ:
Deepali Fernandes, Tel: +41 22 717 9547, Email: dfernandes@iom.int
Sarah McGregor, Tel: +41 22 717 9147, Email: smcgregor@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, November 13, 2018 - 15:25Image: Region-Country: SwitzerlandThemes: Migration and DevelopmentDefault: Multimedia: 

Out of 10 young entrepreneurs selected to visit Geneva during GEW, two candidates – Khaled Karri (left) and Astride Adjinacou – had business models linked to a migration or diaspora experience.

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Libyan Ministry of Labour and Diplomatic Representatives of Regional Neighbours Collaborate on Labour Migration

12 hours 30 min ago

 Tunis – The Libyan Ministry of Labour convened a round table discussion yesterday (13/11), with the support of IOM, the UN Migration Agency, with Libya’s regional partners to discuss labour migration management. The overall aim of the roundtable being to enhance the benefits of migration to the State of Libya, countries of origin of migrants residing in Libya and to migrants themselves.

The round table represents a further step in enhancing collaboration between the Ministry of Labour and participating countries and contributes towards the development of a legal framework that facilitates labour force mobility within the region. This initiative is part of IOM’s wider efforts to assisting the Government of Libya on its migration management efforts and overall aim of assisting migrants in Libya.

 “Best practices in bilateral and regional labour arrangements were presented during the meeting, and the Ministry of Labour of Libya engaged diplomatic representatives of its regional partners in a consultative format that we wish to be maintained, aiming at a coordinated approach to labour migration management,” said Mr. Al-Mahdi Al-Amen, Libya’s Minister of Labour.

 "This is a substantial step towards labour migration governance in Libya," said Mr. Othman Belbeisi, Chief of Mission of IOM Libya.  “IOM has been supporting the Libyan Ministry of Labour and the national leadership towards strengthening mechanisms to address labour market needs through coordinated and country-tailored approaches.”

 “A mass exodus of migrant workers, due to the crisis, has affected many services in Libya,” said Amit Bhardwaj, IOM Libya Project Manager for the Regional Development Protection Programme (RDPP).  “The establishment of an effective migration policy is an essential part of a broader strategy to support economic growth, improving job opportunities for people seeking jobs and improving services in Libya.”

 The Ministry of Labour has made the improvement of labour migration mechanisms a priority by leading a consultative process with its regional partners. IOM supports the Government of Libya by providing strategic advice and support to national authorities on effective migration management mechanisms. 

 As part of its labour migration programming in Libya, IOM is building the capacity of State of Libya through policy and technical advice, supporting the development of strategies, legislation and administrative structures that promote efficient, effective and transparent labour migration flows and facilitating the recruitment of migrant workers.

 The roundtable, supported by the European Union Trust Fund, was co-chaired by Mr. Al-Mahdi Al-Amen, the Libyan Minister of Labour, and Mr. Othman Belbeisi, IOM Libya Chief of Mission. Diplomatic representatives of the following countries participated in the round table: Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Ghana, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Philippines, Senegal, Sudan.  

 For more information, please contact Maya Abu Ata at IOM Libya, Tel: + 00216 58601336, Email: mabuata@iom.int or Safa Msehli, Tel: +216 22 241 842 Email: smsehli@iom.int

 

Language English Posted: Tuesday, November 13, 2018 - 15:20Image: Region-Country: LibyaThemes: Labour MigrationDefault: Multimedia: 

Participants discussed cooperation between Libya’s neighbouring countries and countries interested in labour migration management. Photo: IOM/Safa Msehli

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals Reach 102,611 in 2018; Deaths Reach 2,043

12 hours 31 min ago

Geneva – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, reports that 102,611 migrants and refugees entered Europe by sea in 2018 through 11 November, including 49,912 to Spain, the region’s most active destination point this year, with just under 49 per cent of all 2018 arrivals. This marks the fifth straight year arrivals of irregular migrants and refugees have topped the 100,000 benchmark – although in all previous years that arrival threshold was reached earlier in the year.

The 102,611 arrivals through 315 days of 2018 compares with total arrivals reported for 2017 at this same time last year of 156,372, and of 341,215 in 2016. Deaths on the Mediterranean in 2018 now stand at 2,043, compared with 3,001 a year ago, and 4,329 in 2016.

Mediterranean Developments

        

IOM Greece’s Christine Nikolaidou reported on Monday that over this past weekend a four-year-old Iraqi boy lost his life in a car accident in Northern Greece on Friday evening. He was one of more than two dozen migrants in a minivan involved in an accident with a truck on the Egnatia Highway in Vrasna, 80km east of Thessaloniki, Greece. IOM Greece said the youngster was one of four minors in the vehicle, and reported 27 people were injured, including two Iraqis who are believed to be smugglers. According to Greek authorities, migrants being transported were from Somalia, Bangladesh and Iraq.

Further research through the day Monday revealed Friday’s accident was the eighth fatal vehicle accident involving irregular migrants since early March, and the fourth to occur near the town of Kavala, on northern Greece’s main highway linking its second largest city, Thessaloniki, with the Greece-Turkey border. A total of 25 individuals have died this year in such crashes, and 71 injured (see chart below).

IOM analysts say the vast majority of irregular migrants enter northern Greece through the Greek–Turkish borders in Evros, and their initial goal is to go to a big city, mainly to Thessaloniki or Athens. Their next steps – and their ultimate destinations – tend to be at the discretion of the smuggling networks they use. Almost every accident happens after a high-speed car chase with a police vehicle. Sources tell IOM smugglers usually employ underage migrants as drivers, usually youths of 15 to 17 years old. They tell these children that they cannot be arrested because of their age.

Deaths on the European mainland occur at a rate of about two per week, and highway accidents are a common migration hazard.  So far this year 90 migrants have died crossing Europe, compared with 97 through all of 2017, 63 in 2016 and 136 in 2015 – a total of 387, with about 20 per cent occurring in Greece (82).  Deaths in Greece this year account for more than half of all migrant fatalities on the continent, and half of those deaths occurred in cars (see chart below).

IOM’s Missing Migrants Project (MMP) reported Monday that 3,190 people have died or gone missing on migratory routes across the globe in 2018.

Besides Friday’s vehicle accident, there were reports in the Eastern Mediterranean of a boat capsizing in the early hours of 12 November, a boat in which 15 people from Afghanistan (including four women and their children) were trying to reach the Greek island of Lesvos. That vessel reportedly capsized off the coast of Dikili, Turkey. Two Afghan men managed to swim to shore and alert Turkish authorities. A search and rescue operation has been launched and is underway to search for the 13 missing migrants.

Missing Migrants Project reported three more people died or were lost at sea in the Western Mediterranean. Spanish authorities recovered the bodies of two Moroccans, one of them believed to be a minor, from a boat that reached Spain’s province of Málaga on 10 November. Authorities believe 13 others survived the journey. That same day, the body of a young man washed up on San Amaro beach in Ceuta, Spain’s enclave in North Africa. Initial police investigations indicate he was a resident of Ceuta’s migrant temporary stay centre (known as the “CETI,” Centro de Estancia Temporal de Inmigrantes, or Centre for Temporary Residence of Immigrants), who drowned while attempting to reach the Spanish mainland.

Last week, a boat carrying between 43 and 46 migrants from Morocco capsized off the coast of Cádiz, causing the deaths of at least 21 people. So far, the remains of 18 people have been located at sea or have washed up on the shore of Caños de Meca, with five bodies recovered on 12 November. The Missing Migrants Project team estimates that 55 people have drowned in the Western Mediterranean while attempting to reach Spain since the beginning of the month.

IOM Spain’s Ana Dodevska reported Monday total arrivals at sea in 2018 have reached 49,912 men, women and children who have been rescued in Western Mediterranean waters through 11 November (see charts below).

The land arrivals to Ceuta and Melillahave remained the same since the last update.

IOM Greece’s Antigoni Avgeropoulou said that from Friday (9 November) to mid-day Monday, the Hellenic Coast Guard (HCG) reported there were at least seven incidents requiring search and rescue operations off the port of Alexandroupolis and the islands of Lesvos, Samos and Leros. The HCG rescued a total of 242 migrants and transferred them to the respective islands.

Those arrivals – plus others off Chios, Farmakonisi, Symi, Rhodes, Kos – bring to 28,252 the total number of arrivals by sea to Greece through 7 November (see chart below).

*Unofficial data collected by IOM Greece and the Greek authorities of arrivals by sea.

Worldwide, IOM’s Missing Migrants Project reported Monday that 3,190 people have died or gone missing on migratory routes across the globe in 2018 (see chart below)

Beyond the Mediterranean this week MMP also reported five migrants were killed on the Iraq-Turkey border, and 16 more were injured in a vehicle accident near Saray, in Turkey’s eastern province of Van. No information regarding the country of origin, sex or age of the deceased was released by Turkish authorities.
In the Americas, two men who had left their homes in Central America to migrate north lost their lives while transiting through Mexico on 6 November. One man was killed when he fell of the train he was riding near Tepeji del Río, Hidalgo, while the second man drowned in the Río Bravo near Guerrero, Coahuila.
Missing Migrants Project data are compiled by IOM staff but come from a variety of sources, some of which are unofficial. To learn more about how data on migrants’ deaths and disappearances are collected, click here.

For latest arrivals and fatalities in the Mediterranean, please visit: http://migration.iom.int/europe
Learn more about the Missing Migrants Project at: http://missingmigrants.iom.int
For more information, please contact:
Joel Millman at IOM HQ, Tel: +41 79 103 8720, Email: jmillman@iom.int
Flavio Di Giacomo, IOM Coordination Office for the Mediterranean, Italy, Tel: +39 347 089 8996, Email: fdigiacomo@iom.int
Kelly Namia, IOM Greece, Tel: +30 210 991 2174, Email: knamia@iom.int
Atigoni Avgeropoulou, IOM Greece, Tel: +30 210 99 19 040 (Ext. 166), Mobile: +30 69 48 92 98 09, Email: aavgeropoulou@iom.int
Christine Nikolaidou, IOM Greece, Tel: +30 210 99 19 040 (Ext. 248), Email: cnikolaidou@iom.int
Dimitrios Tsagalas, IOM Cyprus, Tel: + 22 77 22 70, E-mail: dtsagAalas@iom.int
Ana Dodevska, IOM Spain, Tel: +34 91 445 7116, Email: adodevska@iom.int
Massaia Meryem, IOM Morocco, Email: mmassaia@iom.int
Hicham Hasnaoui, IOM Morocco, Tel: + 212 5 37 65 28 81, Email: hhasnaoui@iom.int
Christine Petré, IOM Libya, Tel. +216 29 240 448, Email: chpetre@iom.int
Myriam Chabbi, IOM Tunisia, Mobile: +216 28 78 78 05, Tel: +216 71 860 312 (Ext. 109), Email: mchabbi@iom.int
Mircea Mocanu, IOM Romania, Tel:  +40212115657, Email: mmocanu@iom.int
Ivona Zakoska, IOM Regional DTM, Austria, Tel: + +43 1 5812222, Email: izakoska@iom.int
Julia Black, IOM GMDAC, Germany, Tel: +49 30 278 778 27, Email: jblack@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, November 13, 2018 - 15:12Image: Region-Country: SwitzerlandThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesMissing MigrantsDefault: Multimedia:  Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Number of Refugees, Migrants from Venezuela Reaches 3 Million

Fri, 11/09/2018 - 10:12

Geneva – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, and UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency announced yesterday (08/11) that the number of refugees and migrants from Venezuela worldwide has now reached three million.

According to data from national immigration authorities and other sources, countries in Latin America and the Caribbean host an estimated 2.4 million refugees and migrants from Venezuela, while other regions account for the rest.

"Countries in Latin America and the Caribbean have largely maintained a commendable open-door policy to refugees and migrants from Venezuela; however, their reception capacity is severely strained, requiring a more robust and immediate response from the international community if this generosity and solidarity are to continue," said Eduardo Stein, UNHCR-IOM Joint Special Representative for Refugees and Migrants from Venezuela.

Colombia has the highest number of refugees and migrants from Venezuela – a total of over one million. It is followed by Peru, with over half a million; Ecuador, over 220,000; Argentina, 130,000; Chile, over 100,000 and Brazil, 85,000.
In addition to South American countries, countries in Central America and the Caribbean also recorded increasing arrivals of refugees and migrants from Venezuela. Panama, for example, is now hosting 94,000 Venezuelans.

With rising numbers, the needs of refugees and migrants from Venezuela and the communities hosting them have also significantly increased.

Governments in the region are leading the humanitarian response and coordinating their efforts, including through the Quito Process, which has been an important step towards a regional approach to scale up the response and harmonize policies. The second Quito meeting of governments from the region will take place on 22 and 23 November.

To support this response, the Regional Inter-Agency Coordination Platform, established in September and composed of 40 partners and participants, including UN Agencies, other international organizations, civil society and faith-based organizations, is strengthening the operational response and on a humanitarian Regional Response Plan for Refugees and Migrants from Venezuela (RMRP), to be launched in December.

The RMRP will focus on four strategic areas: direct emergency assistance, protection, socio-economic and cultural integration and capacity-building for the governments of receiving countries.
You can view this statement online here.

The members of the Regional Inter-Agency Coordination Platform for Refugees and Migrants from Venezuela, are supporting the governments' response in the region.

Platform members are present in the field across the region providing direct emergency assistance and protection to refugees and migrants from Venezuela through the provision of basic health care, distribution of water and sanitation, blankets, hygiene kits, temporary accommodation, food and humanitarian transport, among others.

The Platform members have also strengthened their presence along key borders to provide information on legal status and documentation, regularization, rights and assistance.

The participants of the Platform are working to provide information on preventing Sexual and Gender Based Violence, trafficking, smuggling and child protection. In addition, one of the initial products of the Platform is the development of a network of Support Spaces to provide a space for refugees and migrants from Venezuela, along with host communities, returnees and persons at risk of statelessness, among others, access up-to-date information and immediate standardized package of services and assistance.

Platform partners are increasingly giving priority to initiatives which facilitate socio-economic and cultural integration of refugees and migrants from Venezuela in their host communities. As an example, labour integration initiatives have been implemented in Costa Rica, Ecuador, Panama, Peru and Trinidad and Tobago. Different arrangements of vocational, employability and entrepreneurship training and orientation. Also, some members are making efforts and preparing to support municipalities on the long-term challenges and opportunities related to the arrival of refugees and migrants.

The participants of the Platform are also working to prevent xenophobia and sensitize on the importance of integration of refugees and migrants from Venezuela. Some examples are the national campaigns recently implemented in Colombia, Peru and Costa Rica.

For more information contact: Juliana Quintero, IOM Regional Office, South America, Email: juquintero@iom.int, Tel: +54 1132488134 Language English Posted: Friday, November 9, 2018 - 17:15Image: Region-Country: SwitzerlandThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesRefugee and Asylum IssuesDefault: Multimedia: 

Colombia hosts the highest number of migrants and refugees from Venezuela.  Photo: IOM

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Suspended for Two Years, IOM Resumes Voluntary Humanitarian Return Flights from Southern Libya

Fri, 11/09/2018 - 10:11

Libya – The UN Migration Agency, IOM, resumed its Voluntary Humanitarian Return Programme (VHR) in Libya’s southern city of Sebha yesterday (08/11). VHR provides support to stranded migrants wishing to return to their home countries. In recent months, IOM has been expanding its outreach in the south through multiple field missions to make VHR operations possible.

The charter, which landed in Lagos, Nigeria, came after IOM’s outreach activities with local authorities and Nigerian communities in the south. In close coordination with the Nigerian Embassy in Tripoli, the Organization facilitated the provision of online consular support which enabled the embassy to conduct consular authentication and issue travel documents.

“We have been working intensively in the South to make sure that migrants living in urban settings or detention centres, who wish to return home safely, can receive our support,” said IOM VHR Operations Assistant, Mohamed Hmouzi.

The land transportation for migrants from BraK AL Shati and Sebha, located 80 kilometres and 30 kilometers – subsequently, from Tamanhent International Airport, was secured in collaboration with the local authorities. The migrants were also provided with food and non-food items. IOM provided protection screenings for vulnerable migrants and medical screening prior to their departure.

The charter carried 120 migrants (75 men, 30 women, 6 children and 9 infants) to Lagos. IOM will be working closely with the local authorities to ensure they reach all stranded migrants in the south who are interested in VHR assistance. 

So far in 2018, IOM has provided voluntary humanitarian return assistance to a total of 14,622 migrants in Libya, out of which 3,503 were Nigerian migrants. Nigeria is the top country of return from Libya, followed by Mali and Niger.

IOM will continue monitoring and assessing the needs of stranded migrants in southern Libya for the provision of humanitarian assistance, VHR registration, medical care, as well as other pressing needs.

This charter was funded by the European Union Emergency Trust Fund for Africa.

For more information, please contact Maya Abu Ata at IOM Libya, Tel: + 00216 58601336, Email: mabuata@iom.int or Safa Msehli, Tel: +216 22 241 842 Email: smsehli@iom.int

 

IOM Facilitates Voluntary Return of 124 Somalis Following Brief Clashes at Airport in Tripoli

Mogadishu – Brief clashes erupted on Wednesday night interrupting the departure of an IOM charter flight carrying 124 Somali migrants returning from Libya.

IOM was prepared to depart from Tripoli’s Mitiga Airport when clashes broke out after the returnees had boarded the plane.

IOM Libya looked after the returnees until it was safe to depart on Thursday morning.

The charter was organized by IOM in collaboration with the Federal Government of Somalia.

Libya is part of what is known as the Central Mediterranean Route and remains a transit point for migrants seeking to go to Europe.

The returnees were supported by the EU-IOM Joint Initiative on Migrant Protection and Reintegration, in coordination with the Office of the Special Envoy for Migrants, Refugees and Children's Rights, along with the National Commission for Refugees and Internally Displaced Persons and UNHCR Somalia.

The EU-IOM Joint Initiative facilitates orderly, safe, regular and responsible migration management through the development of rights-based and development-focused procedures and processes on protection and sustainable reintegration. The project, backed by the EU Trust Fund, covers and has been set up in close cooperation with a total of 26 African countries. The EU-IOM Joint Initiative is due to celebrate its second anniversary on 16 December.

The 124 Somali returnees will be provided with post-return assistance that would include help in re-establishing their lives. A total 355 Somalis returning from Libya have been assisted with voluntary humanitarian assistance since the beginning of the year.

Commenting on the latest returns, IOM’s senior regional programme coordinator Julia Hartlieb said: “The Joint Initiative programme aims to work at the sustainability of reintegration through local ownership and partnership and seeks to respond to Somalia’s migration governance priorities and needs.”

For more information, please contact the IOM Regional Office in Nairobi, Wilson Johwa, Tel: +254 701 838 029, Email: wjohwa@iom.int

 

Language English Posted: Friday, November 9, 2018 - 17:10Image: Region-Country: LibyaThemes: Assisted Voluntary Return and ReintegrationDefault: Multimedia: 

Nigerian migrant returnees boarding the plane to Lagos from southern Libya on 8 November 2018. Photo:  IOM/Moayad Zaghdani

120 migrants, among them 30 women, left Libya for Nigeria on 8 November 2018. Photo:  IOM/Moayad Zaghdani

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

EU’s Multi-Million Euro Support for IOM, Partners Helps Thousands of Stranded Migrants in Bosnia and Herzegovina

Fri, 11/09/2018 - 10:11

Sarajevo – With elevated numbers of migrants and refugees entering Bosnia and Herzegovina since 2017, the European Union has just allocated more than EUR 7.2 million in grants to support the work of the UN Migration Agency, IOM, in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

The funds were provided through an Instrument for Pre-Accession Assistance special measure. Resultant projects will be implemented by IOM in partnership with the UN Refugee Agency and UNICEF to help further strengthen the country's migration management, asylum, border control and surveillance capacities.

This allocation will also build on the existing support in the distribution of food and provision of emergency shelter, water, sanitation and hygiene services, protection, as well as other necessities to migrants, asylum seekers and refugees.

“With close to 22,000 migrants having arrived in the country since January, it is clear that Bosnia and Herzegovina needs international support. This new funding will allow IOM and partners to assist migrants and authorities and relieve the pressure on local communities,” noted Peter Van Der Auweraert, IOM’s representative in the western Balkans.

Access to asylum, protection and social security systems, including healthcare and education for children, will be improved through support to the Border Police, Service for Foreigners' Affairs, the Sector for Asylum, Centres for Social Welfare and relevant Cantonal and Municipal authorities.

Shelter, water, sanitation and hygiene infrastructure will be put in place or expanded to provide secure and dignified accommodation, protecting families with children and other vulnerable individuals from the looming Balkan winter.

This project will further build on EU’s longer-term support for protection-sensitive migration management in line with EU standards.

Based on available data, 28,709 irregular migrants were registered in Albania, Montenegro and Bosnia and Herzegovina between January and 4 November 2018. 75 per cent of the overall migrants registered this year in the above listed countries were apprehended in Bosnia and Herzegovina, where since the beginning of the year, authorities reported 21,584 new irregular migrants – 19 times more than the 1,166 registered in the whole of 2017. Part of the migrants and refugees who arrived in Bosnia and Herzegovina did so after spending a certain amount of time in Serbia, Greece and Turkey. According to the available information on nationalities, one third of migrants registered in Bosnia are Pakistani nationals (34%), followed by those from the Islamic Republic of Iran (16%), the Syrian Arab Republic (12%), Iraq (9%) and more than 67 different nationality groups.  Available data from IOM field colleagues indicates that there are estimated 3,286 migrants and refugees residing in different official and unofficial reception centers in the country, mainly in Una-Sana Canton in the vicinity of the border with Croatia.

In Albania and Montenegro, Syrian nationals comprised the majority (51% and 45% respectively), followed by those who arrived from Pakistan (13% and 17% respectively), Algeria and Iraq (both 8%) in Montenegro, and Iraq (10%) in Albania. The differences in the nationality structure of registered migrants between the three countries are explained by the fact that migrants in Bosnia and Herzegovina also enter from Serbia (especially migrants form Islamic Republic of Iran and Pakistan), and that certain groups of migrants from Montenegro continue not only toward Bosnia and Herzegovina but towards Serbia as well. As of 28 October, 3,011 migrants were apprehended in Albania on both entry and exit in the Gjirokastra and Shkodra regions respectively. 52 per cent of migrants apprehended in Albania were detected on entry from Greece (a total of 1,551) and the remaining 48 per cent are apprehended while trying to exit the country towards Montenegro (a total of 1,460).  In Montenegro, 4,114 were registered as of 4 November – 6 times more than the 669 registered between January and November 2017. According to available data, 182 migrants and asylum seekers were accommodated in official reception centers in Montenegro on 4 November.

Available DTM flow monitoring data for Serbia and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia also indicate increased movement of irregular migrants to/through these countries. Between January and 31 October 2018, there were 7,257 newly registered migrants in the reception centers across Serbia. This is a 28 per cent increase from the 5,676 registered in the whole of 2017. Further on, arrivals in Serbia almost doubled in October when compared to September – 1,662 vs. 920 respectively. Almost half of all registered migrants in Serbia as of 31 October declared Pakistani origin (46%), another 30% were from Afghanistan followed by 14% from the Islamic Republic of Iran, 5% from Bangladesh, and 2% from Iraq. On 4 November, 3,422 migrants and asylum seekers were reported to reside in different accommodation centers across the country. In the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia authorities reported the arrival of 2,962 irregular migrants as of 4 November, five times the 547 reported in the whole of 2017. Available information on nationalities as of end of October indicates that the Islamic Republic of Iran is the most commonly reported origin country declared by 60% of the registered migrants. Iraqi nationals comprise another 18%, Pakistani nationals 8% and Afghanis 8%. Some 51 migrants and asylum seekers were residing in official reception centers in the country on 4 November.

For more information, please contact Joe Lowry, IOM Regional Office in Vienna, Tel: +436603776404, Email: jlowry@iom.int

Language English Posted: Friday, November 9, 2018 - 17:00Image: Region-Country: Bosnia and HerzegovinaThemes: Migrant AssistanceDefault: Multimedia: 

The new EU funding will allow IOM and partners to assist migrants and authorities and relieve the pressure on local communities. Photo: IOM

The new EU funding will allow IOM and partners to assist migrants and authorities and relieve the pressure on local communities. Photo: IOM

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

IOM Conducts Survey of One Central American Migrant Caravan

Fri, 11/09/2018 - 10:11

San Salvador – The UN Migration Agency (IOM) yesterday (08/11) released the results of a survey conducted among migrants that are part of a ‘migrant caravan’ that left from San Salvador on 31 October.

Of the total sample analysed in the survey, it was found that 79.8 per cent of respondents said they joined the caravan seeking better quality of life. Another 45.7 per cent of respondents said they migrated due to insecurity or violence, while 2.9 per cent responded they were relocating for family reunification.

"These data indicate that the bulk of the people surveyed [cite] a multiplicity of reasons for migrating," said Jorge Peraza Breedy, IOM's Chief of Mission for El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala. "In most cases, they refer two different causes as factors that drove the decision to mobilize, and in many cases, up to three."

Some 60 per cent of those surveyed (286 people) came from the urban area. The study also determined that 83 per cent of individuals in this caravan, made up of approximately 1,700 people, are adults between 18 and 50 years old while 12 per cent are children and adolescents.

The gender breakdown of this caravan is 80 per cent male, 20 per cent female. Also, 8 per cent of those who claimed to be the head of a travel group (a person leading a group of migrants travelling together) identified themselves as members of the LGBTI community. An estimated 1.7 per cent of the travel groups included a pregnant woman, while 5.2 per cent of these included a lactating woman.

However, only 12.2 per cent of respondents stated that they knew about the mechanisms for requesting asylum, refuge or some other form of protection in their country of destination.

"This situation highlights the need to strengthen communication of these issues," said Peraza.

Other humanitarian needs detected through the survey were related to medications and treatments for chronic diseases. Eleven per cent of the people surveyed mentioned requiring some type of medicine and 8.8 per cent indicated that they had a severe or chronic illness.

This information has been made available to different government entities and civil society actors, to facilitate the elaboration of action plans that offer comprehensive responses to the migrants in these flows. The survey did not include the collection of personal information, and for its preparation, the expressed and informed consent of the participant was requested before initiating the questionnaire, in strict adherence to the respect of human rights and to the IOM principles of data protection.

The study was conducted with the methodology of the Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM), which IOM has applied around the world in various crises. The DTM was developed by the Human Mobility Information Management Initiative in the Northern Triangle, with the support of the IOM Emergency Fund.

Download the full survey results here.

For more information please contact José Miguel Gómez at IOM El Salvador, Tel: +503 2521 0500, Email: miggomez@iom.int

Language English Posted: Friday, November 9, 2018 - 16:55Image: Region-Country: El SalvadorThemes: Migration ResearchDefault: Multimedia: 

83 per cent of approximately 1,700 people in the caravan are adults between 18 and 50 years old while 12 per cent are children and adolescents. Photo: IOM

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

IOM Trends Analysis: Most Horn of Africa Migrants Move within Region

Fri, 11/09/2018 - 10:10

Nairobi – Nearly 400,000 migrant movements were recorded in Djibouti, Ethiopia and Somalia during the first six months of 2018 – an average of 2,000 or more individuals per day.

It is an active migration zone, characterized by what is considered “mixed” migration – or the movement of different population groups for a variety of reasons.

A slim majority (51%) of these individuals are moving from, but also within, the Horn of Africa, followed by about 35 per cent whose movements are towards the Gulf Cooperation Council countries on the eastern route – through Djibouti, Somaliland and Puntland.

Smaller movements are being tracked along the Southern Route (to South Africa) and the Northern Route (to Egypt and Israel), about 8 and 5 per cent, respectively.

IOM also recorded over 50,000 arrivals in Yemen during the first half of 2018, which is consistent with the 90,000-100,000 rates of arrivals from Africa annually to Yemen during recent years.

These are a few of the findings detailed in a new report, entitled A Region on the Move, that provides mid-year trend analyses of the main events and key population mobility patterns across the East and Horn of Africa (EHoA) region.  The report provides evidence-based insights into major displacement crises and migration trends observed during the first six months of 2018.

Among the major highlights:

  • Some 970,000 Ethiopians were forced to flee their homes between April and June (2018) following inter-communal conflict in the areas between the Southern Nations, Nationalities, and Peoples’ Region (SNNPR) and the Oromia Region;
  • Somalia continues to be affected by protracted and new displacements, with an estimated 2.6 million internally displaced persons as of May 2018; 
  • Burundian refugees continue to return from Tanzania, with a total of 27,184 recorded during the first seven months of 2018, bringing the total number of returns to 45,180 since the process began in September 2017;
  • Eritrea and Ethiopia signed a landmark declaration of peace and friendship on 9 July, followed by a joint declaration between Eritrea and Somalia that affirmed a mutual commitment to foster regional peace, stability and economic integration;
  • In another important milestone, the African Union adopted a Protocol on Free Movement of Persons in Africa in January 2018. 

These and other trends in migrant movements are studied by the Regional Data Hub (RDH) for the EHoA, established at the beginning of 2018. The RDH aims to support evidence-based, strategic and policy-level discussions on migration through a combined set of initiatives that build on IOM’s extensive migration portfolio in the East and Horn of Africa region. This includes establishing a baseline for regional migration flows, increasing information management capacity across countries to strengthen data consolidation, quality control and conducting research on mixed migration to publish timely and relevant reports and trend analyses.

Commenting on the operations of the RDH, IOM Regional Director Jeffrey Labovitz said: “The data hub is a flagship initiative to inform practitioners and partners on mobility. We saw a gap in the consolidation and dissemination of information and our aim is to provide a reference point in the region on migration.”

The cornerstone of the RDH is the Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM), used by IOM to regularly track and monitor displacement and population mobility, as well as provide critical information to decision-makers and responders during and in the aftermath of crises, and contribute to a better understanding of population flows. In the EHoA, the DTM is implemented across six countries: Burundi, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Somalia, South Sudan and Uganda. It has the widest coverage of primary data collection on internal displacement and migration in the region.

Funding for the RDH was largely provided through the EU-IOM Joint Initiative for Migrant Protection and Reintegration in the Horn of Africa. More commonly known as the ‘Joint Initiative’, the project facilitates orderly, safe, regular and responsible migration management through the development of rights-based and development-focused procedures and processes.

The Joint Initiative, backed by the EU Trust Fund for Africa, covers and has been set up in close cooperation with a total of 26 African countries.

Recent publications can be found here.

For more information, please contact the IOM Regional Office in Nairobi. Laura Nistri, Tel: +254 204 221 000, Email: lnistri@iom.int or Wilson Johwa, Tel: +254 701 838 029, Email: wjohwa@iom.int

Language English Posted: Friday, November 9, 2018 - 16:50Image: Region-Country: KenyaThemes: Migration ResearchDefault: Multimedia: 

A group of migrants from the Horn of Africa arrive in Obock, Djibouti, guided by a local 'facilitator'. Photo: IOM/Olivia Headon

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

IOM Zimbabwe Supports Government Efforts to Improve Livelihoods Through Financial Literacy

Fri, 11/09/2018 - 10:10

Harare – Remittance payments from Zimbabweans toiling outside their country arrive here at a rate of about USD 2 million per day. That’s more than pocket change for a people who have suffered economic hardship through recent decades. However, besides cash coming home, many of the recipients of these funds need something more: life lessons on how to best leverage that support for their households.

For that reason, IOM, the UN Migration Agency, earlier this month (03/11) concluded a two-week long financial literacy workshop for remittance-receiving households in Zimbabwe’s capital, Harare. In partnership with a local private voluntary organization, CareerAid, IOM also conducted financial literacy workshops in targeted areas of Chitungwiza and Norton. The project was supported by the Africa Caribbean Pacific – European Union (ACP-EU) Migration Action Programme under the Non-State Actor Initiative.

Building on IOM’s successful past experiences and unique expertise, the project, aimed at training 400 community leaders on financial literacy, is just one approach to promoting effective engagement between Zimbabwe and its diaspora.

“The diaspora is an important stakeholder in Zimbabwe, having contributed USD 698.9 million in foreign exchange. We thank IOM for complementing government efforts through this project,” explained Tapiwa Mucheri, Principal Economist in the Zimbabwe Diaspora Directorate in Zimbabwe.

“This initiative is critical in promoting financial independence of remittance receivers and can lead to trust by the diaspora to utilise the financial system to send money back home,” he added.

By complementing the Government of Zimbabwe’s efforts under its Financial Inclusion Strategy, the financial literacy initiative also encourages the use of formal channels of sending and receiving remittances and increase the knowledge of community members on how to effectively use the money they receive from family abroad.

‘Blessing’, a remittance receiver from Warren Park, with relatives in South Africa and the UK, said she appreciated the workshop.

“It was a great learning experience,” she said. “I acquired knowledge on budgeting and starting small businesses with what I receive from my relatives. I look forward to manage my remittances in a better way.”

This assertion was amplified by ‘Angela’ in Chitungwiza who has relatives in Australia. She explained: “Sometimes we receive money from our relatives and misuse it, knowing that we will get more in the future.  From now on, I will use the knowledge I acquired from the training workshops to improve my life, taking advantage of the incentives offered by different money transfer agencies.”

The workshop revealed that remittances can positively contribute to household expenditure on health care and education and have been associated with positive outcomes for family members in these areas. The effective use of remittances will assist Zimbabwe to meet the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) Three and Four.

For more information please contact Varaidzo Mudombi at IOM Zimbabwe, Tel: +263242704285, Email: vmudombi@iom.int

Language English Posted: Friday, November 9, 2018 - 16:45Image: Region-Country: ZimbabweThemes: Community StabilizationDefault: Multimedia: 

Some of the participants at IOM Zimbabwe’s financial literacy workshop in Harare. Photo: IOM

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals Reach 101,185 in 2018; Deaths Reach 2,040

Fri, 11/09/2018 - 10:09

Geneva – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, reports that 101,185 migrants and refugees entered Europe by sea in 2018 through 7 November, including 49,254 to Spain, the region’s most active destination point this year, with just under 49 per cent of all 2018 arrivals. This marks the fifth straight year arrivals of irregular migrants and refugees have topped the 100,000 benchmark – although in all previous years that arrival threshold was reached earlier in the year.

Researchers for IOM’s Missing Migrants Project (MPP) noted that this week marks the death, just over 30 years ago, of a Moroccan man whose body washed up on the beaches of Tarifa. That victim today is considered the first person to die while trying to migrate across ‘El Estrecho’, from North Africa to Spain. 

So far in 2018, at least 617 people have lost their lives in this same crossing. This week alone, at least 52 people died or were lost at sea in the Western Mediterranean. In the early hours of Monday, an unidentified man's body was found on Los Caños beach in Barbate, in southern Spain. Since then, the bodies of six more men have been recovered in the area by Spain’s Coast Guard, Salvamento Marítimo, and at least 14 remain missing. All those on this boat are thought to be from North Africa.

Also, on Monday, another two boats of people trying to reach Spanish territory of Melilla sank off the coast. In total, 80 people (75 men and 5 women), mostly from Sub-Saharan Africa, were rescued and brought to Melilla, along with the remains of 13 of their fellow passengers.  Based on testimonies of survivors, at least 31 remain missing. 

IOM Spain’s Ana Dodevska reported Monday total arrivals at sea in 2018 have reached 49,254 men, women and children who have been rescued in Western Mediterranean waters through 7 November (see charts below).

 

IOM Greece’s Christine Nikolaidou said Thursday that from Tuesday (6 November) to mid-day Thursday, the Hellenic Coast Guard (HCG) reported there were at least four incidents requiring search and rescue operations off the islands of Samos, Farmakonisi and Rhodes. The HCG rescued a total of 113 migrants or refugees and transferred them to the respective islands.

Those arrivals bring to 27,771 the total number of arrivals by sea to Greece through 7 November (see chart below).


          * Unofficial data collected by IOM Greece and the Greek authorities of arrivals by sea.

 

Worldwide, IOM’s Missing Migrants Project has recorded 3,180 people who have died or gone missing on migratory routes across the globe in 2018 (see chart below).

Beyond the Mediterranean this week MMP also recorded two people who died trying to reach Mayotte from the Comoros Islands. In mid-September, a girl’s body was found on the coast of the island, and on 3 November, the body of a man.  Both remain unidentified. The boat journey of approximately 230 kilometres from the Comoros Islands to the French territory of Mayotte remains an active and dangerous migration route.

In the Americas, two men who had left their homes in El Salvador to migrate north, lost their lives. One man was killed when he fell of the train he was riding in Tabasco, Mexico, while the second man died of fatigue and dehydration in San Marcos, Guatemala. He was travelling with the “Caravan of Migrants” at the time. The deaths of two young men (ages 16 and 17) in February were also recorded. They died when the plane in which they had stowed away took-off from Guayaquil, Ecuador.  The plane was en route to New York City. 

Missing Migrants Project data are compiled by IOM staff but come from a variety of sources, some of which are unofficial. To learn more about how data on migrants’ deaths and disappearances are collected, click here.

For latest arrivals and fatalities in the Mediterranean, please visit: http://migration.iom.int/europe
Learn more about the Missing Migrants Project at: http://missingmigrants.iom.int

For more information, please contact:
Joel Millman at IOM HQ, Tel: +41 79 103 8720, Email: jmillman@iom.int
Flavio Di Giacomo, IOM Coordination Office for the Mediterranean, Italy, Tel: +39 347 089 8996, Email: fdigiacomo@iom.int
Kelly Namia, IOM Greece, Tel: +30 210 991 2174, Email: knamia@iom.int
Atigoni Avgeropoulou, IOM Greece, Tel : +30 210 99 19 040 (Ext. 166), Mobile: +30 69 48 92 98 09, Email: aavgeropoulou@iom.int
Christine Nikolaidou, IOM Greece, Tel: +30 210 99 19 040 (Ext. 248), Email: cnikolaidou@iom.int
Dimitrios Tsagalas, IOM Cyprus, Tel: + 22 77 22 70, E-mail: dtsagalas@iom.int
Ana Dodevska, IOM Spain, Tel: +34 91 445 7116, Email: adodevska@iom.int
Massaia Meryem, IOM Morocco, Email: mmassaia@iom.int
Hicham Hasnaoui, IOM Morocco, Tel: + 212 5 37 65 28 81, Email: hhasnaoui@iom.int
Christine Petré, IOM Libya, Tel. +216 29 240 448, Email : chpetre@iom.int
Myriam Chabbi, IOM Tunisia, Mobile: +216 28 78 78 05, Tel: +216 71 860 312 (Ext. 109), Email: mchabbi@iom.int
Mircea Mocanu, IOM Romania, Tel:  +40212115657, Email: mmocanu@iom.int
Ivona Zakoska, IOM Regional DTM, Austria, Tel: + +43 1 5812222, Email: izakoska@iom.int
Julia Black, IOM GMDAC, Germany, Tel: +49 30 278 778 27, Email: jblack@iom.int

Language English Posted: Friday, November 9, 2018 - 16:40Image: Region-Country: SwitzerlandThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesRefugee and Asylum IssuesDefault: Multimedia:  Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Central American Authorities Agree to Share Information About Migration

Fri, 11/09/2018 - 10:05

San Ignacio — The heads of migration agencies from eight Central American nations gathered this week (06/11) at the annual meeting of the Central American Commission of Migration Authorities (OCAM). Those present facilitated a consultation on migratory information and modernizing a common statistical platform, among other agreements.

The UN Migration Agency (IOM), currently serving as the Commission’s technical secretariat, and the government of Belize organized the event.

The OCAM members agreed to allow the consultation of migratory information among member countries; implement migratory alerts; and modernize the platform that feeds the OCAM with statistics concerning entries, departures, and returns. To this end, IOM will provide financing and technical assistance in the development of the Virtual Information Platform for Migration Governance and train relevant actors to use it.

During the OCAM regional migratory summit, members also discussed subjects such as cross-border population flows, intra-regional migratory flows and good IT practices for strengthening integral and regional migration governance.

Marcelo Pisani, IOM Regional Director for Central America, North America, and the Caribbean, reiterated IOM’s support and commitment to countries in the region, stressing the need to open channels for regular migration and to focus energy on both the factors that drive irregular migration as well as the needs of returnees. "It is clear that the migration authorities of this region are preparing to face this challenge,” said Pisani.

The meeting, held in Belize, also gave migration authorities the tools to share advances in the management of migratory flows during massive events in the SICA (Central American Integration System) member countries.

Additionally, it was agreed that a search for funds would be launched to strengthen the protection of migrant women and that a plan for the comprehensive management of migration would be launched, as requested by the presidents of the region during a summit held in the Dominican Republic in June 2018.

OCAM was instituted in 1990 at the request of the presidents of the SICA countries to facilitate Central American integration and the transit of people between the region’s countries.

IOM has been the technical secretariat of OCAM since 1999 and over the years has provided advice and cooperation in the field of migration management.

For more information, please contact Jorge Gallo at the IOM Regional Office for Central America, North America, and the Caribbean, Tel: +506 22125300, Email: jgallo@iom.int

Language English Posted: Friday, November 9, 2018 - 16:34Image: Region-Country: BelizeThemes: Migration PolicyDefault: Multimedia: 

The Central American Commission of Migration Authorities (OCAM) was instituted in 1990. Photo: IOM / Claudia Lara

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Number of refugees and migrants from Venezuela reaches three million

Thu, 11/08/2018 - 14:00

Switzerland - IOM, the UN Migration Agency, and UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency announced today that the number of refugees and migrants from Venezuela worldwide has now reached three million. 

According to data from national immigration authorities and other sources, countries in Latin America and the Caribbean host an estimated 2.4 million refugees and migrants from Venezuela, while other regions account for the rest.

"Countries in Latin America and the Caribbean have largely maintained a commendable open-door policy to refugees and migrants from Venezuela, however, their reception capacity is severely strained, requiring a more robust and immediate response from the international community if this generosity and solidarity are to continue," said Eduardo Stein, UNHCR-IOM Joint Special Representative for Refugees and Migrants from Venezuela.

Colombia has the highest number of refugees and migrants from Venezuela, a total of over one million. It is followed by Peru, with over half a million, Ecuador over 220,000, Argentina 130,000, Chile over 100,000 and Brazil 85,000.

In addition to South American countries, countries in Central America and the Caribbean also recorded increasing arrivals of refugees and migrants from Venezuela. Panama, for example, is now hosting 94,000 Venezuelans.

With rising numbers, the needs of refugees and migrants from Venezuela and the communities hosting them have also significantly increased. 

Governments in the region are leading the humanitarian response and coordinating their efforts, including through the Quito Process, which has been an important step towards a regional approach to scale up the response and harmonize policies. The second Quito meeting of governments from the region will take place on 22 and 23 November.

To support this response, the Regional Inter-Agency Coordination Platform, established in September and composed of 40 partners and participants, including UN Agencies, other international organizations, civil society and faith-based organizations, is strengthening the operational response and working on a humanitarian Regional Response Plan for Refugees and Migrants from Venezuela (RMRP), to be launched in December.

The RMRP will focus on four strategic areas: direct emergency assistance, protection, socio-economic and cultural integration and capacity-building for the governments of receiving countries.

For more information contact:

Juliana Quintero, IOM (juquintero@iom.int +54 1132488134)

William Spindler, UNHCR (spindler@unhcr.org +507 69290257 or +41 79 2173011)

Consult our website: R4V.info

Language English Posted: Thursday, November 8, 2018 - 13:51Image: Region-Country: SwitzerlandThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesDefault: Multimedia: 

Colombia hosts the highest number of migrants and refugees from Venezuela.  Photo: IOM

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

The Forgotten ‘Migrant Caravan’: Historic Launch of Global Movement of Families of the Missing

Tue, 11/06/2018 - 08:31

Mexico City — Each year, the Caravana de Madres de Migrantes Desaparecidos (Caravan of Mothers of Missing Migrants) crosses Mexican territory in search of their children who went missing trying to reach the United States.

For the first time, the Mothers’ Caravan was joined in Mexico City by mothers from other continents, with the aim of building a transnational movement to remind the international community that one disappearance, one death, is one too many.

Over 40 mothers and other family members searching for missing migrants from El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Mexico, Senegal, Mauritania, Tunisia and Algeria came together to share their stories, to build ties, and to exchange experiences of searching for information on the whereabouts of their children.

IOM’s Missing Migrants Project attended this historical event as an observer.

The summit was convened by the Movimiento Migrante Mesoamericano and the Italian Carovani Migranti, two NGOs which assist mothers and families of missing migrants in Central America and Italy, respectively. Associations representing families of the missing sent delegations to the Summit, including the Tunisian Association Mères des Disparus, the Algerian Collectif de Familles des Harraga d'Annaba, the Mauritanian Association des Femmes Chefs de Famille, the Salvadoran Comité de Migrantes Desparecidos, the Honduran Comité de Familiares de Migrantes Desaparecidos del Progreso and the Mexican Red de Enlaces Nacionales.

Rosa Idalia Jiménez has been looking for her son, Roberto Adonai Bardales Jiménez, since 28 May 2013. He disappeared when he was 14, as he fled poverty and violence in his home country towards the US border. He wanted a safer, better life. The last time Rosa heard from him, he was preparing to cross the US-Mexico border into Texas from Reynosa, Mexico.

Rosa shared her story this weekend at the first-ever Global Summit of Mothers of Missing Migrants. The Summit took place in Mexico City 2–4 November 2018 as part of the 8th World Social Forum on Migration.

It is not only mothers who participated in the Summit, but also sisters, brothers, fathers, grandmothers. They wear photos of the missing around their necks, in the hope that someone will recognize their loved ones and be able to help find them. They vow not to rest until their searches are over.

The disappearance of a loved one, no matter the context, leaves a family mourning their loss, or waiting for news of a missing father, husband, wife, mother, son or daughter. Caught between grief and hope, families begin a search for information about their loved ones that can take years or a lifetime. Coming together around such tragic circumstances, the mothers can share their stories of pain, grief, and, above all, endless love for their missing children.

Over the course of three days, mothers and family members at the Summit discussed the many obstacles they face in their search for their missing relatives. Without national or international search mechanisms, families are left to navigate a confusing web of institutions and bureaucracy with little state support.

Nonetheless, they persist: the mothers’ caravan has organized annual marches through Mexico to raise awareness and search for lost loved ones since 2005. By the end of this first Global Summit of Mothers of Missing Migrants, participants mapped out a plan to globalize the struggle of families searching for missing migrants. A manifesto was collaboratively drafted on the final day of the Summit, setting out the mothers’ demands for truth and justice for their missing sons and daughters.

As the way forward, the mothers agreed on a list of actions, which include joint advocacy campaigns around key events, supporting regional initiatives put forward by each association, and creating an online platform to coordinate their efforts.

The Summit thus marks the beginning of a global movement of mothers and families of the missing: there is an urgent need to raise awareness about deaths and disappearances during migration and to combat indifference towards these global tragedies.

For further information please contact Marta Sanchez Donis, IOM Global Migration Data Analysis Centre, Tel: +49 1511 0001 187, Email: msanchez@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, November 6, 2018 - 15:09Image: Region-Country: MexicoThemes: Missing MigrantsDefault: Multimedia: 

IOM’s Missing Migrants Project attend the Caravana de Madres de Migrantes Desaparecidos (Caravan of Mothers of Missing Migrants). Photo: IOM

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Big Name Brands Visit Rohingya Refugee Camps in Bangladesh

Tue, 11/06/2018 - 08:30

Cox’s Bazar – Representatives from Coca Cola, GAP and Mastercard, along with other big-name brands, have visited Rohingya refugee camps in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, with IOM, the UN Migration Agency, to explore how private businesses can help support one of the world’s biggest humanitarian responses and understand how they can be a partner with IOM for the benefit of migrants across the globe. The visit marks the first time IOM has ever invited key representatives of leading companies to explore opportunities within the humanitarian and migration nexus in one of its field operations. 

Professionals from the textile, aviation, technology, telecommunications, and financial services industries met with Rohingya refugees and spoke to IOM programme managers in the field, as well as to IOM chiefs over two days, before going on to discuss a range of innovative approaches to ongoing challenges in the camps. 

The visit came as part of a three-day event organized jointly by IOM Headquarters and IOM Bangladesh, which began in the capital Dhaka, aimed at developing partnerships with the private sector to end modern slavery and human trafficking by supporting ethical recruitment and fair supply chains. IOM recognizes that businesses are partners and important stakeholders in tacking these challenges. 

“The most positive changes arise when people and organisations work together to find solutions,” said Giorgi Gigauri, IOM’s Chief of Mission in Bangladesh. 

He added that IOM in Bangladesh supports those who are suffering the ongoing impact of forced migration into the country, as well as Bangladeshi nationals who travel within the country and abroad for education and work opportunities. Both groups, he stressed, are potentially vulnerable to exploitation and abuse. 

“Human trafficking and modern slavery can only be effectively ended when everyone – governments, UN bodies, NGOs, communities and private businesses – unite in their efforts to end these scourges,” said Gigauri. 

Almost a million Rohingya are now sheltering in Bangladesh following a massive upsurge in violence in Myanmar last year, which sent over 700,000 people fleeing over the border, creating the world’s largest refugee settlement. 

More than a year since the crisis began, the need for innovative solutions to infrastructure and social challenges in the camps and surrounding communities is increasing every day. 

Delegates from Turkish Airlines, Korea Telecom and technology group NEC, as well as well-known Bangladeshi firms, including textile leaders DBL Group, along with private sector partnership platforms Innovation Norway and Humanity United, were among those who took part in the visit. 

Participants saw first-hand how IOM and its partners are using innovative communications and other technologies to prevent and respond to new emergencies, support critical medical services, and develop durable and effective solutions to shelter, water, sanitation, lighting, access and other critical needs in the camps. 

During their visit, delegates witnessed how solar technology is providing street lighting and powering medical clinics, and how remote learning projects supported by IOM are helping children in local villages learn English via live online link-ups with teachers in Dhaka. 

The visitors also learned how IOM protection staff are using creative approaches to prevent the rising threat of human trafficking and to tackle gender-based violence. 

But they also heard from refugees about the many challenges and difficulties they face. These include not having sufficient warm clothing as the winter season approaches, and the lack of livelihood opportunities, which continues to leave most families entirely reliant on aid. 

Following their visit to the camps and conversations with members of the refugee and local communities and IOM staff, the company representatives held a wide-ranging discussion with IOM managers on how to progress. 

Potential solutions raised ranged from working with garment sector representative bodies to supply winter clothing to people in the camps, to developing livelihood opportunities that recognize the needs of both local Bangladeshis and the refugee community. 

“Information and communications technology has the potential for responding to a variety of issues. We believe that we can contribute in innovative ways to all the goals outlined in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by engaging in dialogues and co-creation with IOM,” said NEC executive Saeki Akari. 

During their first day in the country, the private sector representatives discussed broader issues relating to Bangladeshi migrant workers. 

In a country of cheap labour costs, Bangladesh’s factories produce garments and other products for world-famous brands, as well as low-end suppliers, and draw workers from rural areas across the country. Meanwhile an estimated 600,000 Bangladeshis travel abroad each year in search of work. 

Opportunities for exploitation are rife, and IOM is committed to partnering with leaders in the private sector to develop best practices and innovative ways to end exploitation and abuse of vulnerable workers in Bangladesh and abroad. 

In accordance with IOM’s Private Sector Partnership Strategy 2016-2020, IOM has launched a number of initiatives that are intended to provide private sector partners with practical solutions for the implementation of ethical recruitment and fair supply chain practices that help them meet their sustainability benchmarks and make progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals. 

“IOM welcomes the support shown by the companies who have joined with us for this visit,” said Gigauri. “ We look forward to working more with the private sector in Bangladesh and beyond, not only to address the challenges faced by migrants, but also to explore how businesses and migrants can work together to benefit each other, the wider economy and society as a whole.” 

For more information please contact Fiona MacGregor at IOM Cox’s Bazar. Email: fmacgregor@iom.int. Tel. +88 0 1733 335221.

Language English Posted: Tuesday, November 6, 2018 - 15:08Image: Region-Country: BangladeshThemes: Private Sector PartnershipsRohingya CrisisDefault: Multimedia: 

Representatives from major companies have visited the world’s largest refugee camp in Cox’s Bazar to explore how private businesses can help the humanitarian response. Photo: Muse Mohammed/IOM 

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

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