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Updated: 1 hour 29 min ago

IOM, Citi Foundation Expand Partnership to Support the Integration of Venezuelans

Tue, 11/19/2019 - 09:46

Bogota – The number of refugees and migrants from Venezuela is expected to reach 6.5 million by the end of next year, according to the recently launched Regional Refugee and Migrant Response Plan (RMRP). Facing that daunting challenge, the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and the Citi Foundation launched a project yesterday (18/11) to enhance the livelihoods of Venezuelans and host communities in Colombia and Perú. 

The Citi Foundation works to promote economic progress and improve the lives of people in low-income communities around the world. 

The exodus of Venezuelan nationals is one of the largest external displacement crises in the world today. Around half of the 4.6 million people who have left Venezuela since 2015 - based on the latest figures of the Regional Coordination Platform for Refugees and Migrants from Venezuela - can be found in neighbouring Colombia and Perú.  

Figures are projected to reach 2.4 million in Colombia and 978,000 in Perú next year.  Many, in fact, are nationals of those two Andean countries, citizens of Colombia and Perú who spent years, even decades, living and working in neighbouring Venezuela. 

A significant number of Venezuelans arrive with qualifications and skills to contribute to the economy of the hosting countries, but access to formal employment can often prove difficult.  

“Citi is committed to being part of the solution to this humanitarian crisis,” said Alvaro Jaramillo of the Citi Foundation during the launch event. “We firmly believe—as an integrated partner in the communities where we live and work—that we have a shared responsibility to address the challenges we all face.” 

The partnership will provide vocational training and certifications to more than 400 Venezuelan youth. The project also includes an incubator for mixed entrepreneurial ventures comprised of Venezuelans, Colombian returnees and host community members. IOM’s non-profit partner, USA for IOM, will host educational events in the US to further raise awareness on the issue. 

“There needs to be much more attention on the magnitude of the crisis, as the outflow continues unabated and is growing by the day,” said Luca Dall’Oglio, CEO of USA for IOM. “This partnership offers a space for the private sector, humanitarian and development actors, civil society and international financial institutions to discuss support not only for emergency assistance but long-term needs like socioeconomic and cultural integration.” 

Since 2015, Citi Foundation has granted IOM nearly USD 1 million toward efforts to help vulnerable adolescents and youth develop the necessary skills and competencies to increase income generation opportunities in digital ecosystems and improve their livelihoods.   

The latest investment to support the economic integration of Venezuelans in Perú and Colombia doubles total contributions to almost USD2 million. 

“Our collaboration with the Citi Foundation has served as a catalyst to inspire more engagement from the private sector over the past few years,” said Ana Eugenia Durán Salvatierra, IOM Colombia Chief of Mission. “Multi-stakeholder commitment is ever so critical as we now face the biggest population movement in Latin America’s recent history,” she added. 

The Citi Foundation invests in efforts that increase financial inclusion, catalyse job opportunities for youth, and reimagine approaches to building economically vibrant cities. For more information, please see: www.citifoundation.com

For more information, please contact Liz Lizama at IOM Washington, Tel.+1 202 716 8820, Email: elizama@iom.int  

Language English Posted: Tuesday, November 19, 2019 - 16:50Image: Region-Country: Papua New GuineaThemes: Disaster Risk ReductionDefault: Multimedia: 

Representatives of IOM, Office of the President of Colombia, Peru Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the US Agency for International Development participated in a panel discussion at the launch of a new project to support the socioeconomic integration of Venezuelans in Colombia and Peru. Photo: IOM/Liz Lizama 

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Voluntary Return Assistance Continues from North Africa to West Africa

Tue, 11/19/2019 - 09:46

Bamako – Assisting migrants to return to their countries of origin sometimes requires creativity and the cooperation of several IOM member states. This month, Mali stepped up to offer its territory as a transit point for West and Central African migrants heading to eight countries of origin after being stranded in Algeria. 

Last week (13/11) the International Organization for Migration (IOM) assisted 108 stranded migrants to voluntary return from Algiers, Algeria’s capital, to their countries of origin. Thirty of those passengers had migrated from Mali, itself. The other 78—including 24 women—returned to eight different countries: Guinea, Nigeria Ghana, Senegal, Côte d’Ivoire, Benin, Cameroon and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. 

On this second flight from Algeria, the passengers were selected for their vulnerability and special circumstances—for example, many were women—including single mothers—and children. IOM spokesperson Florence Kim explained having Mali as a transit point averts leaving smaller groups of migrants originating from countries—such as Benin—having to remain stranded in Algeria and it allows to organize their returns by air or land directly to their countries. 

 “It is essential to guarantee the safety of migrants willing to return home. The 78 non-Malians transited through Mali to avoid being stranded in Algeria too long,” explained Pascal Reyntjens, IOM Chief of mission in Mali. “An efficient transit reception mechanism also helps ensure a thorough identification of the assisted migrants including the confirmation of their vulnerabilities.” 

Before departing, IOM protection team assessed the passengers to ensure their safe and sustainable return. Upon arrival in Bamako, Mali’s capital, non-Malian migrants were accompanied by IOM Mali staff to their respective countries of origin via land and/or air, where they received with post-arrival and reception assistance.  

Regardless of the country of return, all returnees will receive immediate assistance upon arrival, including food, pocket money and onward transportation to their final communities of origin. In-kind reintegration assistance will also be available to start a new life back home. 

The charter was made possible thanks to the cooperation and support of the Algerian government, the Malian government, in partnership with Air Algérie and with the contribution of the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation. All governments of origin provided travel documents to their nationals. 

This movement falls under IOM’s Global Migration Governance Framework (MiGOF) Objective 3: 'Migration should take place in a safe, orderly and dignified manner'.  

It is also in line with the Target 10.7  of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs): ‘Facilitate orderly, safe, regular and responsible migration and mobility of people, including through the implementation of planned and well-managed migration policies’, and Target 17.17 ‘Encourage and promote effective public, public-private and civil society partnerships, building on the experience and resourcing strategies of partnerships’. 

 

For more information, please contact Florence Kim at IOM Regional office for West and Central Africa: Tel: +221786206213; Email: fkim@iom.int  

Language English Posted: Tuesday, November 19, 2019 - 16:45Image: Region-Country: AlgeriaMaliThemes: Refugee and Asylum IssuesDefault: Multimedia: 

108 migrants stranded in Algeria arrived in Bamako on November 13. Photo: IOM/Hamed Diallo 

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Promoting Sustainable Reintegration of Returned Migrants in West and Central Africa

Tue, 11/19/2019 - 09:46

Dakar – Since 2017, over 68,000 West and Central African migrants stranded along the main migration routes, mainly in Niger (25,400) and Libya (29,900), have been assisted to voluntary return to their countries of origin. Nigeria, Mali and Guinea represent, cumulatively, 50 percent of that caseload. On average, returned migrants are mostly young male (86 per cent) and two percent are unaccompanied children. 

For migrants who have risked everything hoping for new lives outside their countries, returning is difficult. “I can say that those things that pushed me to leave my country, I can have them here now,” said Seyiba, a returned Burkinabe assisted in 2018 by the International organization for migration (IOM). He currently is managing a 500-chicken poultry farm in his country, together with other returnees. 

Successfully managing the reintegration of these returned migrants must be a shared responsibility between governments, IOM and civil society organizations. For that purpose, representatives from 12 West and Central African governments, and the European Union, attended IOM’s first expert workshop on reintegration in West and Central Africa organized last week (12-13/11) in Dakar, Senegal’s capital.  

The main goal was to evaluate the achievements made in the framework of the EU-IOM Joint Initiative for Migrant Protection and Reintegration (Joint Initiative) and create a regional community of best practices. 

IOM’s reintegration assistance can include, among other things, reception at the airport, overnight accommodation, pocket money, psychosocial counselling, vocational training and economic support such as job placements, setting-up of micro-businesses or cash-for-work programmes. 

By its very nature, reintegration is a complex and slow process, but it is the boost migrants need to overcome their stigma and psychosocial distress of returning. So far, among those who returned, nearly 55,000 migrants started the reintegration process and over 5,000 received psychosocial support in (descending order) Nigeria, Mali, Guinea, Niger, Côte d’Ivoire, Senegal, The Gambia, Cameroon, Burkina Faso, Ghana, Guinea Bissau, Chad and Mauritania.  

“Reintegration must be a shared responsibility and implemented in full partnership between governments and all layers of the society,” said Richard Danziger, IOM Regional Director for West and Central Africa. “Together, our teams and your governments have accomplished what seemed unthinkable three years ago, working hand in hand to achieve the common goal of leaving no one behind,” he added. 

“Through the Joint Initiative, we have established a functioning model for migrant reintegration,” said Michele Bombassei, Senior Regional Programme Coordinator at IOM. “But there is a need for a more concerted effort, at both political and operational levels, to strengthen migration governance, including reintegration, and ensure the sustainability of a joint response in West and Central Africa,” he added. 

“It’s a small project at first sight, but it is big in size because these are long-term projects,” said one Guinean who returned from Niger in 2017 and who is now working in a poultry farm, currently employing 300 community members and migrants.  

Examples of sustainable and collective projects in Cote d’Ivoire where returned migrants and more than 200 community members work on a waste management project, or in Guinea where returned migrants have set-up a growing potato farm, prove that meaningful reintegration assistance can be achieved by harnessing the skills of the returned migrants, while also addressing issues affecting the broader community. 

During the workshop, IOM also presented its Reintegration Handbook, a newly published guide designed to provide practitioners involved in the provision of reintegration-related support with practical guidance on the design, implementation and monitoring of reintegration assistance for returnees, with a focus on those who are unable or unwilling to remain in host or transit countries. 

Launched in December 2016 with funding from the EU Emergency Trust Fund for Africa, the Joint Initiative is the first comprehensive programme to save lives, protect and assist migrants along key migration routes in Africa. It is implemented in 26 African countries together with African governments. 

For more information, please contact Florence Kim at the IOM Regional Office for West and Central Africa at fkim@iom.int  

Language English Posted: Tuesday, November 19, 2019 - 16:40Image: Region-Country: AlgeriaThemes: Assisted Voluntary Return and ReintegrationDefault: Multimedia: 

108 migrants stranded in Algeria arrived in Bamako on November 13. Photo: IOM/Hamed Diallo 

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

5,800 Energy-Efficient Cooking Stoves Distributed to Internally Displaced Households and Host Communities in Ethiopia

Tue, 11/19/2019 - 09:46

Addis Ababa – Energy efficient cooking stoves for 5,447 households and 381 communal kitchens were distributed by IOM Ethiopia as part of an initiative that will end this month. The energy-efficient cooking-stoves complement the International Organization for Migration (IOM)’s ongoing humanitarian assistance to Internally Displaces Persons and affected populations in the Gedeo-Guji crisis.  

Distribution took place in West Guji and East Wollega Zone in Oromia region, and Gadeo Zones in Southern Nations, Nationalities, and Peoples’ Region.  

Gedeo, West Guji and East Wollega Zones are among the most densely populated areas in Ethiopia, with the majority of IDPs and host communities in these rural locations heavily dependent on forest wood for cooking fuel.  

These improved cooking stoves (ICSs) are boosting the wellbeing of displacement affected communities and supporting the government of Ethiopia’s efforts to mitigate the impact of displacement on the environment. They directly empower households, at the same time helping to reduce disputes over strained firewood resources.  

In addition to communal stoves to bake kocho – a local staple food – vulnerable households, especially those headed by women, were supplied with family-sized, fuel-saving stove kits for cooking.  

The locally procured stoves consume less wood fuel and are more energy efficient compared to traditional stoves. Besides reducing the strain on local forests, the project will also reduce the risk from smoke inhalation and help reduce women and girl’s vulnerability whilst collecting firewood.  

Before hand-over, 156 local officials and 6,500 targeted community members from 8 woredas (districts) and 32 kebeles (wards) were trained on fuel efficient energy and on how to use the kits.  

Since 2018, Ethiopia has recorded one of the highest numbers of internally displaced persons (IDPs) in the world, with border conflicts as the primary driver. DTM Ethiopia reported the presence of 3 million IDPs across the country between March and June 2019.  

Since then, a significant number of IDPs have returned to their places of origin as part of a phased return initiative that the government began in April.  

However, displacement-affected communities still require urgent support to address their emergency and recovery needs.  

Assessments conducted by IOM and World Vision (WVI), as well as concerns raised by humanitarian partners and government counterparts, highlighted lack of access to cooking fuel and competition over the resource as needing urgent intervention. 

With firewood becoming increasingly scarce, IDPs are facing difficulty in accessing energy and find themselves competing with host communities, something likely to result in deterioration of inter-communal relations.  

Moreover, firewood shortages are forcing most women to collect and burn different kinds of waste to fire their kitchens, thus exposing them to toxic smoke especially from burning plastic. 

“Safe access to fuel and energy stands at the intersection of so many things that are of concern – from protection, to nutrition, to health, to the environment, to livelihoods and to education,” said Dawit Mulatu, IOM Ethiopia’s Community Stabilization Officer.  

The initiative is an ongoing effort between the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Republic of Korea and the International Organization for Migration (IOM).  

In the coming months, IOM will conduct post-distribution monitoring to assess stove use, the satisfaction of beneficiaries, and to document lessons learned.  

For more information please contact: Dawit Mulatu, Email: damulatu@iom.int or Eric Mazango, Email: emazango@iom.int 

Language English Posted: Tuesday, November 19, 2019 - 16:35Image: Region-Country: EthiopiaThemes: Assisted Voluntary Return and ReintegrationDefault: Multimedia: 

Returnee woman with newborn child comes to receive her household cooking stove. Photo: IOM 

Woman leaves after receiving her stove from the ICS distribution site in West Guji. Photo: IOM 

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Displacement Tracking Aids Disaster Response in Papua New Guinea’s Autonomous Region of Bougainville 

Tue, 11/19/2019 - 09:46

Port Moresby – Disaster management actors in Papua New Guinea (PNG)’s Autonomous Region of Bougainville (AROB) have adopted IOM’s Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) to better manage data when responding to natural disasters. The remote region experiences earthquakes, volcanic activity and tropical cyclones.    

A two-day DTM training, funded by USAID and held in Buka town, the interim provincial capital, attracted 26 participants from the AROB government, PNG Immigration and Citizenship Authority, NGOs, the UN, churches and media.  

The workshop focused on field level data collection and how to generate information products that better inform planning and evidence-based responses to the multi-sectoral needs of internally displaced people. It also addressed the prevention of sexual exploitation and abuse and gave participants an opportunity to share their knowledge and experience of conducting assessments in crisis situations.  

“Participants learned the skills necessary for tracking population displacement and gathering the critical data that is needed to effectively respond to an emergency and save lives,” said IOM PNG Chief of Mission Lance Bonneau.  

AROB Deputy Chief Secretary Shardrach Himata also welcomed the training. “Systematic data collection and analysis is essential to shaping emergency preparedness and response,” he said. 

IOM’s DTM is designed to capture, process and disseminate information systematically to provide a better understanding of the movements and evolving needs of mobile populations in places of displacement or transit. It also profiles the displaced for better targeting of relief assistance, especially to the most vulnerable, including people living with disabilities, chronically ill people, and women and children.  

“We rely very much on the Displacement Tracking Matrix tools that are provided by IOM to help us coordinate international assistance following disasters,” said UN Humanitarian Coordination Specialist Richard Higgins, who leads the PNG Disaster Management Team Secretariat.   

“We look to IOM and the Shelter Cluster to utilize the DTM tools to help us have a better picture of not only where people are located, but who are the most vulnerable, what types of assistance do they want, and what type of assistance do they need,” he added. 

IOM, in close cooperation with PNG’s national and provincial Disaster Centres, UN and NGO partners, has successfully deployed DTM in various PNG emergencies, most recently displacement caused by the eruption of Mt. Ulawun in June 2019.  

The training was part of a USAID-funded IOM project: Strengthening Early Warning Systems and Preparedness Actions for Disaster Risk Reduction in Papua New Guinea.  

For more information please contact IOM Port Moresby. Lance Bonneau, Tel. +675 3213655, Email: lbonneau@iom.int or Peter Murorera, Email: pmurorera@iom.int  

Language English Posted: Tuesday, November 19, 2019 - 16:28Image: Region-Country: Papua New GuineaThemes: Internally Displaced PersonsDefault: Multimedia: 

Disaster responders in Bougainville adopt IOM’s Displacement Tracking Matrix. Photo: IOM/Peter Murorera 

Disaster responders in Bougainville adopt IOM’s Displacement Tracking Matrix. Photo: IOM/Peter Murorera 

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Deadly Air Strike on Tripoli Factory Stark Reminder of Risks Civilians Face: IOM

Mon, 11/18/2019 - 18:12

Tripoli - The International Organization for Migration (IOM) deplores this morning’s airstrike on a factory in Wadi Rabii, south Tripoli, that the Libyan Ministry of Health says has claimed the lives of at least seven people, including five migrant workers.

Thirty migrants were also injured in the attack, the ministry said. 

“This attack is a stark reminder of the hostile conditions and risks migrants and local communities face on a daily basis,” said IOM Libya Chief of Mission Federico Soda. “Civilians are not a target; their safety must be guaranteed by all parties to the conflict.”   

Hundreds of civilians have died in clashes in Tripoli since the latest round of violence began in April, including 53 migrants killed in an airstrike on the Tajoura detention centre in July. 

According to IOM Libya Displacement Tracking Matrix, there are over 110,000 migrants in Tripoli and surrounding areas, and 2,000 others in detention centres, who remain at risk as clashes continue in the capital. Roughly 128,000 civilians have been displaced due to the fighting.   

For more information, please contact Safa Msehli at IOM Geneva: Tel:+41794035526; Email: smsehli@iom.int
 

Language English Posted: Monday, November 18, 2019 - 18:08Image: Region-Country: LibyaThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesDefault: Multimedia:  Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

IOM, UNCTAD and UNHCR Host a Photo Exhibition on Migrant and Refugee Entrepreneurs

Mon, 11/18/2019 - 12:53

Geneva -  With an estimated 272 million international migrants in the world today, migration has the potential to significantly improve the wellbeing and socioeconomic conditions of migrants and their families, as well as the development prospects in receiving and sending communities, provided it occurs in an informed manner and within a transparent and rights-based regulative environment. 

View Exhibit on Medium 

Today (18/11) the International Organization for Migration (IOM), UNCTAD and UNHCR launched the Global Photo Exhibition on Migration and Entrepreneurship at the Palais des Nations in Geneva. The Exhibition, which runs through Nov 24, illustrates the contributions migrant and refugee entrepreneurs make in their new communities as well as those they come from. 

“At a time when international migration and refugee flows are stirring up fear and even being the target of hatred, we have joined forces to build a narrative based on facts to show the positive social, cultural and economic contributions that migrants and refugees make to their home and host countries,” said UNCTAD Deputy Secretary-General Isabelle Durant.    

The Exhibition was preceded by a Global Competition that received over 80 contributions from every region. These contributions mirror the diversity of migrant and refugee entrepreneurs in terms of the size of their enterprises which can range from micro-businesses to medium or large-scale enterprises, as well as geographical and skills diversities. 

“The Global Photograph Exhibition on Migration and Entrepreneurship is an opportunity to show the diversity of migrant and refugee economic contributions to the communities they live in and those they come from in a variety of industries, and across the globe,” said Renate Held, Director of the IOM Department of Migration Management. 

“It builds on the work of IOM, UNHCR and UNCTAD on Policy Guide on Entrepreneurship for Migrants and Refugees. IOM continues to support migrant entrepreneurship in partnership with UN agencies, governments, civil society and the private sector,” she added. 

The tripartite inter-agency collaboration was initiated with the Policy Guide on Entrepreneurship for Migrants and Refugees which was launched at the Global Entrepreneurship week in 2018. Later the same year, IOM and UNCTAD organized a migration and entrepreneurship competition, which selected 3 migrant entrepreneurs for tailor-made mentoring. 

“Promoting entrepreneurship and economic inclusion enable refugees to provide for themselves and their communities and contribute to preparing them for solutions whenever available," said Mamadou Dian Balde, Deputy Director of UNHCR Division of Resilience and Solutions. 

“The Global Compact on Refugees adopted last year calls for policies that include refugees and help them live in harmony, with the populations hosting them. We witness in several parts of the world refugee entrepreneurs who contribute to the local economies”. 

The Exhibition will be attended by the Ambassadors of Morocco and Uganda, Mr Omar Zniber and Mr Christopher Onyanga Aparr, as well as documentary photographer Thana Faroq and Remi Langlois from 111-Days Association Art for Refugees. 

For more information please contact: 

From IOM: Safa Msehli: smsehli@iom.int 

From UNCTAD Catherine Huissoud: catherine.huissoud@unctad.org 

From UNHCR Jenny Beth Bistoyong: bistoyon@unhcr.org 

Language English Posted: Monday, November 18, 2019 - 12:42Image: Region-Country: GlobalThemes: Capacity BuildingDefault: Multimedia: 

Oksana is an IDP who moved with her husband and two children from the conflict-affected town of Toretsk, in Eastern Ukraine to Kharkiv. She produces wood dust pellets that are used for heating as an alternative to gas, coal or firewood. By Volodymyr Shuvayev, September 2019

A refugee from the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) working in one of the top seafood restaurants in Kyiv, Ukraine. The restaurant, owned by a Ukrainian, was looking for African chefs. A local NGO saw the advertisement and organized an internship, which resulted in three refugees from the DRC received an offer of employment. By Alina Kovalenko, August 2019

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

IOM Tracks Repatriations of Haitian Migrants from The Bahamas

Fri, 11/15/2019 - 10:54

Port-au-Prince – IOM Haiti, along with the Haitian National Office of Migration (ONM in French), has monitored the repatriation of 340 Haitian migrants from The Bahamas. Of the repatriated migrants, 153 were interviewed by ONM upon their arrival at the Port-au-Prince and Cap-Haitian airports. The persons repatriated indicated being mainly from the northern areas of Haiti (Nord-Ouest, Nord, and Nord-Est departments).  

These repatriations had been a common occurrence in the past but were temporarily halted at the beginning of 2019 because of the civil unrest and overall security situation in Haiti. After Hurricane Dorian hit the Bahamas on September 5, the repatriation procedures restarted on October 10, weeks after the Bahamian authorities announced their intention to repatriate all irregular/undocumented migrants from their territory.  

Returnees reported they were mostly apprehended on the streets, in their place of employment, or while in their homes during raids usually carried out in the middle of the night by immigration officials. The returning migrants also indicated that they remained in detention for 10 to 30 days.  

Most of the returnees have indicated that they resided in the Island of Abaco, in the Bahamas and were evacuees from Hurricane Dorian. “We lost everything in the Bahamas because of Dorian. And now they bring us back to Haiti. What will we do?” said one of the returned migrants.  

“We are concerned about these repatriations, as the situation in Haiti remains fragile,” explained Giuseppe Loprete, IOM Haiti Chief of Mission.  

Category 5 Hurricane Dorian hit the Bahamas on September 5, causing widespread destruction in the Islands of Grand Bahama, Eleuthera and Abaco. Many among the affected population in Abaco was Haitian.   

The Bahamas 2010 census estimated that 39,000 of the total 351,000 Bahamian population is made up of Haitians or of persons of Haitian descent.  

ONM and IOM received 105 Haitian migrants, repatriated on 5 November. IOM supported the returnees with post-arrival assistance by providing onward transportation fees and hygiene kits and will soon start providing medical and psychosocial support to those migrants traumatized by their experiences. 

Repatriations of Haitian migrants are expected to continue as Bahamian authorities have communicated their intention to return all irregular migrants from their territory. IOM Haiti will continue to track these returns in direct coordination with IOM Bahamas and ONM to ensure the gathering of accurate information on the returnees and the provision of adequate support to traumatized vulnerable migrants.  

For more information please contact Emmanuelle Deryce at IOM Haiti, Tel: +509 2816 4664, Email: ederyce@iom.int  

 

Language English Posted: Friday, November 15, 2019 - 17:45Image: Region-Country: HaitiThemes: Migrant AssistanceDefault: Multimedia: 

340 Haitian migrants have been returned by the government of Bahamas since 5 September. Photo: IOM/Bernard Lami 

Most of the returnees have indicated that they resided in the Island of Abaco, in the Bahamas and were evacuees from Hurricane Dorian. Photo: IOM/Bernard Lami 

“We lost everything in the Bahamas because of Dorian. And now they bring us back to Haiti! What will we do?” said one of the returned migrants. Photo: IOM/Bernard Lami 

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

IOM Provides Over 1 Million Health Consultations in Yemen Since Start of 2019

Fri, 11/15/2019 - 10:44

Sana’a – With more than four years of conflict pushing the public sector to a breaking point, people in Yemen are struggling to access health care. As part of its emergency lifesaving services and support to the health sector to ensure it continues to function, the International Organization for Migration (IOM) has carried out 1,095,072 health consultations for displaced and conflict affected Yemenis and migrants in 2019 (as of 09/11). 

Only half of Yemen’s health facilities are currently operating, causing people to travel long distances in search of essential services and forcing many to go without. Prior to the conflict in 2015, public facilities were already strained. Today, the lack of financial resources, doctors, medicine and medical equipment has caused further deterioration, while the increased number of people seeking medical assistance in certain areas has overwhelmed health facilities. 

“Our lives are difficult in terms of income, education, health services, water and transportation,” said Maryam, a Yemeni woman living in Birali, Lahj governorate, where IOM helped get the local health centre back up and running. “When there was no health centre, we had to travel to Hadramout or Aden (approximately 120 and 450 kilometres away, respectively); a woman in labour couldn’t do that,” she added. 

IOM’s health programming strengthens key public institutions and helps ensure they survive the crisis. To support the re-establishment of Yemen’s primary health care systems, IOM ensures that public health facilities can provide a minimum servi ce package to their target population through provision of human resource, medicines and medical supplies.  

IOM is supporting the restoration and operational needs of 86 facilities across Yemen, ensuring effective, safe and quality free health care through over 120,000 consultations per month.   

The organization also operates nine mobile health teams, which reach migrants and displaced people who do not have access to traditional health facilities. Four of these mobile teams provide newly arrived migrants with emergency health services along Yemen’s coast. 

Complications with import and internal transportation of items, such as medical stock, puts further pressure on Yemen’s health system by causing critical medications to be unavailable in much of the country. IOM has stockpiles of critical medicines, such as antibiotics or medication for management of Type 2 diabetes, in warehouses across Yemen to ensure IOM-run and supported facilities have a constant supply. 

“With health needs rising and many people living in locations with virtually no health services, IOM’s provision of health care to conflict-affected communities, internally displaced people and migrants is vital to the continuation of accessible health services and the strengthening of the overall health system in Yemen,” said Dr Nedal Odeh, IOM’s Health Programme Coordinator in Yemen. 

Within the over 1 million health consultations, over 19,000 people were provided with psychosocial counselling, 113,000 others received reproductive health consultations, and more than 71,000 people were reached through health awareness-raising activities.  

IOM’s health programming in Yemen is made possible through contributions from the Governments of Canada, Finland, Germany, Japan, the Republic of Korea, Kuwait, Slovakia, the United States and the United Kingdom. IOM also works in partnership with the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Yemen Humanitarian Fund and is a principal recipient for the Global Fund in Yemen.  

For further information, please contact Olivia Headon in IOM Sana’a, Tel: +967730552233, Email: oheadon@iom.int 

 

Language English Posted: Friday, November 15, 2019 - 17:39Image: Region-Country: YemenThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesMigration HealthDefault: Multimedia: 

IOM provides lifesaving health care to conflict affected communities, displaced people and migrants in Yemen, while strengthening public health facilities. Photo: IOM/Olivia Headon 

IOM provides lifesaving health care to conflict affected communities, displaced people and migrants in Yemen, while strengthening public health facilities. Photo: IOM/Olivia Headon 

IOM provides lifesaving health care to conflict affected communities, displaced people and migrants in Yemen, while strengthening public health facilities. Photo: IOM/Olivia Headon 

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Young Filmmakers from Spain, Mexico and Jordan Win Top Awards at PLURAL+ Youth Video Festival 2019

Fri, 11/15/2019 - 10:38

New York – Young filmmakers from Spain, Mexico and Jordan whose films covered the themes of migration, diversity, social inclusion, and the prevention of xenophobia won the top awards at the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and United Nations Alliance of Civilizations (UNAOC)’s 11th Awards Ceremony of the PLURAL+ Youth Video Festival at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, earlier this week (13/11). 

With filmmakers ranging in age from seven to 25, the PLURAL+ 2019 International Jury selected three videos for the top awards: Seeking Refuge (Spain) which follows the story of a young refugee girl as she tries to adapt to life in a new country; Tags (Mexico) which explores the issues of discrimination and pre-conceived notions and We are Enough: A Message of Girl Empowerment (Jordan) which examines the expectations placed upon women and girls by society. 

In addition, the IOM-UNAOC Award for the Prevention of Xenophobia went to the film Brazilian, But Not Soccer Player (Brazil) which addresses with humour the issue of stereotypes against people from different cities, countries, and cultures.  

This year, 25 videos out of a record 1,200+ submissions from almost 70 countries received awards. Young filmmakers came to New York from all corners of the world and had the opportunity to screen their films and say a few words to an audience of more than 200, which included Ambassadors, UN representatives, journalists, filmmakers, and youth. The remaining 21 finalists received awards from the many partner organizations of PLURAL+. 

The Awards Ceremony opened with a musical performance by Latin Grammy Award winner Linda Briceño (Venezuela), followed by the screening of the winning videos of the PLURAL+ International Jury Awards. 

IOM Director General, António Vitorino, and the High Representative for the United Nations Alliance of Civilizations (UNAOC), Miguel Ángel Moratinos delivered opening remarks and presented awards to the young filmmakers. 

IOM DG Vitorino said, “Today, we recognize two powerful forces – youth and film. Combined, they hold the power to bring about positive change, to shift divisive narratives, to promote peace and dialogue – put simply, to make a better world.” 

He added, “The videos that we will screen today are evidence of the resilience of young people. These youth filmmakers have not allowed the negative narratives of migration – so popularized in contemporary media – to rob them of their empathy.” 

“PLURAL+ provides a space for young people to express their visions on pressing social issues freely,” said High Representative Miguel Ángel Moratinos said. “When you see PLURAL+ videos created by young talents from around the world, you feel optimistic that our complex world will be a better place tomorrow.” 

With the PLURAL+ Youth Video Festival, IOM and UNAOC address objectives 16 and 17 of the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration (GCM) by empowering migrants and societies to realize full inclusion and social cohesion and promoting evidence-based public discourse to shape perceptions of migration. With increasing interest and participation each year, PLURAL+ has become a premier global platform for youth media distribution.      

For the past 11 years, Plural+ has received over than 3,000 video entries from more than 110 countries. Winning videos have been screened at festivals, in schools and at conferences, as well as streamed online and broadcast on television networks around the world.       

Watch webcast of the event here

Watch PLURAL+2019 winning videos here

View social media coverage on IOM NY and PLURAL+ Twitter accounts. 

For more information, please contact Rahma Gamil Soliman, Mobile: +1 917 515 7454, Email: rsoliman@iom.int at IOM’s New York Office to the UN, and Thibault Chareton, Mobile: +1 646 306 8780, Email: thibaultc@unops.org at UNAOC 

 

Language English Posted: Friday, November 15, 2019 - 17:33Image: Region-Country: United States of AmericaThemes: Migration and YouthDefault: Multimedia: 

IOM Director General, António Vitorino (2nd from right, front row) and UNAOC High Representative Miguel Ángel Moratinos (3rd from right, front row) with the PLURAL+ 2019 winners. Photos: UNAOC 2019. 

IOM Director General António Vitorino (right) and UNAOC High Representative Miguel Ángel Moratinos (left) during the screening of the winning videos. Photo: UNAOC/IOM 2019 

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Virtual Counselling Helps Migrants Learn More about Return Options from Germany

Fri, 11/15/2019 - 10:33

Berlin – Making the decision on whether to leave one’s country of origin is rarely one migrants take lightly. Deciding whether to go back home can be equally challenging. A project called Virtual Counselling, recently introduced in Germany, can help address migrants’ concerns.   

Migrants in Germany considering a return to their countries of origin can now contact IOM staff in several African and Asian countries to learn about return and reintegration options.    

Migrants can call and message IOM staff in nine countries of origin to speak in their native language about what reintegration is going to look like in their individual case. Those countries are Armenia, Bangladesh, Ghana, Guinea, Ethiopia, Iraq, Nigeria, The Gambia and Pakistan.  

Via social media and online messaging services, IOM staff inform callers about all available reintegration options in each country. This can include, for example, financial assistance for a business start-up, support for housing or medical needs, psychosocial counselling or job counselling.   

This pilot project is financed by the German Federal Office for Migration and Refugees. Since the start of the project, more than 250 virtual counselling sessions have taken place.  

Kobby Benjie is a Ghanaian returnee, who was supported by IOM. “The possibility to talk to a fellow countryman on WhatsApp and ask questions about returning home, is a great help for Ghanaians in Germany,” he explained.   

One reintegration officer at IOM Nigeria, Jude Okoye Jonathan, added: “We get calls from migrants in Germany who had just started to consider a voluntary return and would like to get a first idea of their options. Migrants also ask concrete questions about reintegration support in their countries.”   

He explained: “They trust us, because we speak their language and we are directly at the location where they plan to return to.”  

In Germany, IOM engages with diaspora and important multipliers to raise awareness among migrants about this new counselling offer and to increase trust and transparency in a field active with multiple programmes and stakeholders.   

“It is crucial for a successful reintegration to connect the two ends of the voluntary return process,” said one German return counsellor, who often refers migrants to the new Virtual Counselling. “I very much appreciate this type of collaboration between sending and receiving countries.”   

“With Virtual Counselling, we are able to reach migrants outside of the traditional return counselling structure,” added Monica Goracci, Chief of IOM’s Mission in Germany.   

Around 50 per cent of the migrants who had a virtual counselling session so far, had not yet visited a counselling centre in Germany.    

“Access to timely, unbiased and reliable information is essential to dignified voluntary return and sustainable reintegration, allowing migrants to make an informed decision and take ownership of the voluntary return process in full respect of their human rights and regardless of their status,” IOM’s Goracci added.  

For more information, please contact Sabine Lehmann at IOM Germany, Tel: +49 30 27877817, Email: slehmann@iom.int   

 

Language English Posted: Friday, November 15, 2019 - 17:26Image: Region-Country: GermanyThemes: Assisted Voluntary Return and ReintegrationIntegrationDefault: Multimedia: 

IOM counsellors from eight African and Asian countries and German return counsellors at a joint workshop in Berlin, working on connecting pre-departure counselling with reintegration and how to reach better communities. Photo: IOM 

IOM counsellors from eight African and Asian countries and German return counsellors at a joint workshop in Berlin, working on connecting pre-departure counselling with reintegration and how to reach better communities. Photo: IOM 

IOM counsellors from eight African and Asian countries and German return counsellors at a joint workshop in Berlin, working on connecting pre-departure counselling with reintegration and how to reach better communities. Photo: IOM 

IOM counsellors from eight African and Asian countries and German return counsellors at a joint workshop in Berlin, working on connecting pre-departure counselling with reintegration and how to reach better communities. Photo: IOM 

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

IOM, Canada Team Up to Communicate Risks of Irregular Migration in Central America

Fri, 11/15/2019 - 10:26

San José – The International Organization for Migration (IOM) is partnering this week with the Government of Canada’s Department of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship (IRCC) to raise awareness amongst prospective migrants in Central America about the dangers of irregular migration, through the project Communicating Risks of Irregular Migration in Central America.  

As part of the project, IOM has engaged with communities with high emigration rates from El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala, to support the development of tailored mechanisms to better inform people of the risks of irregular migration and at the same time, build local capacities to ensure the sustainability of these initiatives.  

“Canada’s support has allowed IOM’s communications efforts to target efficiently more communities in the region.  We are providing people with tools to make informed decisions concerning migration and working with children and adolescents is key to addressing current and future issues,” said Marcelo Pisani, Regional Director for IOM North America, Central America and the Caribbean. 

One key element in this joint approach is strengthening municipal information hubs in these communities, through the development of information materials and training packages for staff to diminish the influence of myths surrounding migration. 

IOM also identified young people as the most at risk of exploitation and abuse, and as such it has engaged with Ministries of Education and schools in communities to train teachers and students on developing activities with peers in their schools to communicate on the risks associated with irregular migration.  

The baseline assessment that IOM has conducted in these countries with more than 230 students, showed that young people can mention at least one risk of irregular migration, but less than 20 per cent can identify trafficking in persons as such; and 25 per cent of them would be willing to migrate and would hire the services of a smuggler.   

These findings are used to develop with their community, participative activities adapted to their contexts. These activities have reached 609 schoolchildren in the last six months, teaching them about irregular migration and the risks it entails. 

“Irregular migration should not be an option to get ahead, we should always try to follow our dreams but in a way, that we keep our physical, emotional and psychological integrity safe,” stated Aracely Acosta, one of the students who participated in a workshop at her school in El Salvador.   

These initiatives complement the efforts made by governments in Central America to promote regular, orderly and safe migration, which are also supported by the US Department of State’s Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration (PRM), through the Mesoamerica Regional Migration Program, which aims to support governments in strengthening their migration management capacities. 

For more information contact Tatiana Chacón at the IOM Regional Office in San José, Tel:  +506 2212 5313, Email: tchacon@iom.int 

 

Language English Posted: Friday, November 15, 2019 - 17:20Image: Region-Country: Costa RicaThemes: Capacity BuildingDefault: Multimedia: 

The baseline assessment conducted for the project showed that young people can mention at least one risk of irregular migration, but less than 20 per cent can identify trafficking in persons as such. Photo: IOM. 

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Nigeria Immigration Service, IOM Launch Border Management Information System at Largest Airport to Date

Fri, 11/15/2019 - 10:20

Abuja – Nigeria, like many countries, recognizes the economic, social and political benefits of international mobility. This week (12/11) the Nigeria Immigration Service (NIS) officially opened its new Migration Information and Data Analysis System (MIDAS) at the Nnamdi Azikiwe International Airport in Abuja.  

The Abuja Airport is the second busiest airport in Nigeria, serving approximately five million passengers annually. The MIDAS system, developed by the International Organization for Migration (IOM), enables immigration and border officials to process travellers more rapidly and professionally, making their border-crossing experience safer and more humane.  

“MIDAS helps the Government of Nigeria to better understand mobility patterns through its statistical information and also ensure that those crossing Nigerian borders do not pose threats to national and international security,” explained Muhammad Babandede, NIS Comptroller General during the commissioning event at the airport.  

MIDAS also enables States to more effectively monitor those entering and exiting their territory by land, air and sea while providing a sound statistical basis for migration policy-related planning.  

To date, the project represents the largest deployment of MIDAS at any airport globally and it will be implemented in four other Nigerian airports welcoming travellers: in Lagos, Enugu, Kano and Port Harcourt. This marks a breakthrough for Nigeria which hopes to establish one of the world’s largest MIDAS data networks. 

“MIDAS improves the effectiveness and efficiency of Nigeria’s air border management by strengthening NIS’ ability to manage and facilitate cross border movements,” added Nicolai Ruge, Ambassador-at-large for Migration of the Government of Denmark.  

The project Enhancing Air Border Data Systems in Nigeria is supported by the Government of Denmark. MIDAS in Nigeria has been also supported by other donors including the Governments of Germany, Japan, Norway and Switzerland as well as the European Union. 

This nationwide system will enable real-time data synchronization between the airports and the NIS Headquarters in Nigeria’s capital to effectively monitor those entering and exiting through the country’s air borders. The system can also send automatic queries to INTERPOL databases and relevant watchlists in order to detect travel documents and individuals potentially linked to transnational organized crime, including human trafficking and migrant smuggling. 

“This is just the beginning. With support of the international community, we will continue investing in strengthening legal, technical and operational capacities of Nigerian authorities in the area of border management in line with international standards and good practices,” said Ivanka Spadina, IOM Senior Programme Manager. 

A set of standard training packages is also being delivered for the country’s immigration officers and government IT focal points as part of the MIDAS roll-out. IOM also promotes a responsible use of biometrics, in full respect of privacy and personal data protection laws and international standards. 

Developed and globally managed by IOM, MIDAS is a fully customizable Border Management Information System (BMIS) for States seeking a non-commercial, cost-effective and comprehensive solution.  

MIDAS has been designed to be compliant with international standards (ICAO and ISO) and is currently operational in over 20 countries globally.  

IOM also ensures that governments such as Nigeria have the full and exclusive ownership of any data recorded by MIDAS. 

For more information, please contact Ivanka Spadina, Email: ispadina@iom.int or Jorge Galindo, Email: jgalindo@iom.int at IOM Nigeria

Language English Posted: Friday, November 15, 2019 - 17:17Image: Region-Country: NigeriaThemes: Integrated Border ManagementDefault: Multimedia: 

Abuja Airport is the second busiest airport in Nigeria, serving approximately 5 million passengers annually. Photo: Sascha Pimentel/IOM 2019 

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals Reach 91,568 in 2019; Deaths Reach 1,091

Fri, 11/15/2019 - 10:17

Geneva – IOM reports that 91,568 migrants and refugees have entered Europe by sea through 13 November, roughly an 11 per cent decrease from the 103,347 arriving during the same period last year.  

Arrivals this year to Greece and Spain are at 50,371 and 22,343, respectively, (72,714 combined) accounting for about 79 per cent of the regional total, with the balance arriving in much smaller numbers to Italy, Malta and Cyprus. Arrivals to Greece are running approximately 75 per cent ahead of 2018’s totals from this time. Arrivals to Spain are more than 50 per cent lower.  

Deaths recorded on the three main Mediterranean Sea routes through 13 November stand at 1,091 individuals – or about 52 per cent of the 2,117 deaths confirmed during the same period in 2018 (see chart below).  

These 1,091 deaths at sea include several documented only in recent days. IOM’s Missing Migrants Project reported this week that along the Western Mediterranean route, the body of a male Moroccan who died from drowning was recovered on 7 November between Al Hoceima and Chefchaouen, Morocco. The man’s remains were taken to Hospital Mohamed V in Chefchaouen in Morocco.  

The remains of an individual believed to be from North Africa were recovered on 8 November at the Port of Melilla, Spain. He is reported to have fallen from a cargo truck that was on a ferry. 

IOM Italy 

IOM Rome’s Flavio Di Giacomo cited official Ministry of Interior figures of 9,944 migrants have arrived in Italy by sea this year through 13 November, compared to 22,518 at this same time in 2018.  

IOM Libya has reported that through 31 October almost 8,300 migrants have been intercepted at sea and returned to Libya in 2019. 

IOM Greece 

IOM Greece’s Christine Nikolaidou reported on Thursday (14/11) that from Friday (08/11) up to date, the Hellenic Coast Guard (HCG) participated in at least 23 incidents requiring search and rescue operation off the islands of Chios, Lesvos, Samos, Kos, Symi, Leros, Farmakonisi and the port of Alexandroupoli. The HCG rescued a total of 718 migrants and transferred them to the respective ports. 

Those arrivals, plus others between 6 and 12 November, bring to 50,371 the total number of sea arrivals to Greece this year (see chart below).  

Missing Migrants Project 

2019 is the sixth year of IOM’s efforts to systematically record deaths on migration routes worldwide through its Missing Migrants Project. Since the beginning of 2014, the project has recorded the deaths of 33,984 people, including 2,822 in 2019 (see chart further below). 

Due to the challenges of collecting information about these people and the contexts of their deaths, the true number of lives lost during migration is likely much higher. Missing Migrants Project records should only be viewed as indicative of the risks associated with migration, rather than representative of the true number of deaths across time or geography. 

This week a dataset containing reports of migrant deaths was added to the Missing Migrants Project from the Mixed Migration Centre’s Mixed Migration Monitoring Mechanism (4mi) surveys in Asia. In total, 67 new incidents were recorded between April and August 2019, for a total of 193 newly recorded deaths during migration. Of these, 112 were reported in Southeast Asia; 75 in South Asia, and another six in North-eastern Europe.  

The information contained in 4mi’s surveys, which is difficult to verify, sheds light on the fact that many deaths during migration go unrecorded and unreported. Testimonies from even this relatively small sample indicate that people on the move across Eurasia face many risks to their life, including sickness and lack of access to medicine, starvation, dehydration, exposure, vehicle accents and violence. 

Migrant deaths in the Americas continue during what may be the deadliest year MMP has recorded in the past six years. In total, at least 634 people have lost their lives in the Americas in 2019, compared with the 517 that were recorded through this point in 2018.  

On the US-México border, skeletal remains of an unidentified individual, believed to be from Latin America were recovered from a ranch near the Falfurrias Border Patrol Checkpoint, Brooks County, Texas, USA on 12 November.  

Further south, the body of a 44-year-old man believed to be from Central America, was found on the train tracks near Estación Ochoa, municipality of Pánuco, Veracruz, México on 11 November. He is believed to have fallen from a train. Also, on the 12 November, the remains of two migrants from Cuba were recovered in Luis Gómez Cepeda, Tenosique, Tabasco, México. Both were murdered. They were believed to be a couple traveling together. One was pregnant.  

Missing Migrants Project data are compiled by IOM staff based at its Global Migration Data Analysis Centre but come from a variety of sources, some of which are unofficial. To learn more about how data on migrants’ deaths and disappearances are collected, click here.  

The report Fatal Journey Volume 4, published 28 June, includes an overview of five years of Missing Migrants Project data (2014-2018) and an update on what is known about deaths during migration in 2019.  

For latest arrivals and fatalities in the Mediterranean, click here. Learn more about the Missing Migrants Project.  

See contacts here

Language English Posted: Friday, November 15, 2019 - 17:08Image: Region-Country: SwitzerlandThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesMissing MigrantsDefault: Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Emergency Response Project for Displaced Communities in Niger Concludes Amid Deteriorating Security Situation

Fri, 11/15/2019 - 10:10

Niamey – This November, the International Organization for Migration (IOM)’s emergency response project Emergency Humanitarian Assistance to Affected Populations in Tillabéry, funded by the Government of Japan, came to an end. 

The nine-month project aimed to prevent the exacerbation of the already dire situation in the Tillabéry region by improving the living conditions of the crisis-affected population and increasing the communities’ resilience. 

The northern part of the region of Tillabéry in Niger has been severely impacted by the situation in neighbouring Mali, which has faced ongoing conflict and insecurity since 2012. 

This conflict has led to the displacement of more than 75,000 people, adding to the already existing refugee population of over 56,000 people in the regions of Tahoua and Tillabéry. 

Over 1,250 emergency shelters and 1,250 non-food item kits have been distributed to 6,500 vulnerable individuals. Prior to the delivery of the emergency shelters, trainings were organized for displaced communities on how to assemble the shelters.  

Since the beginning of the project in March 2019, the security situation in the region has continued to deteriorate with several attacks taking place in the region. Considering these incidents, the governor of Tillabéry suspended in May all movement to the region’s northern departments and stressed the need of military security escorts for any crucial movements in those areas. 

These measures taken by the regional authorities led to the suspension of all humanitarian activities in May by the United Nations Resident Coordinator (UN-RC). The measure was then lifted in June with alternative solutions to military escorts found, such as humanitarian corridors allowing humanitarian actors to operate in a secured perimeter. 

Before and during the implementation of the project, IOM worked closely with the Ministry of Humanitarian Action and Disaster Management (MAH) in Niger, the shelter and non-food item working group, Protection Cluster and local authorities, to determine the best course of action. 

To implement the project’s activities in the region of Tillabéry, IOM partnered with local NGO Développement Endogène Durable et Innovation (DEDI), one of the few associations still operating in the conflict-ridden region. 

“This project came at a crucial moment where no other organization had any access to these sites and these communities thought they had been forgotten,” said Edmond Soro, DEDI’s Director. “It has been challenging to implement this project because of the region’s inaccessibility, but it also been highly rewarding to be able to give these communities some hope for the future.” 

The insecurity in the region has also affected the displaced communities’ access to basic health facilities and assistance. Following discussions with the Health Cluster and local health authorities, one of the key components chosen for the project was to carry out health activities for close to 8,000 displaced people living on three different sites in the department of Abala.  

The department of Abala is currently the department with the highest number of displaced people in all of Tillabéry, hosting over 27,000 vulnerable displaced individuals. 

Through IOM’s partnership with NGO DEDI, more than 5,000 children have been vaccinated and over 500 women have benefitted from pre-natal consultations. An additional 500 women and girls have received menstrual kits along with awareness-raising sessions on menstrual hygiene. Malaria prevention outreach sessions were organized, and mosquito nets and medication were also distributed during the length of the project. 

Hadiza, 25, is one of the Nigeriens who fled the border region with Mal i and now lives on the site of Ikerfan in the department of Abala. Four hours prior to DEDI’s visit on the site, Hadiza had a miscarriage and was losing blood. DEDI and the accompanying local doctor treated her on site, and she managed to have a quick recovery. 

“This project has brought some much-needed relief to close to 15,000 people,” said Barbara Rijks, IOM’s Chief of Mission in Niger. “There is an urgent need for basic assistance for these remote communities. Given the continued displacements in the region, international humanitarian aid is still needed to support the needs of vulnerable communities,” she concluded. 

For more information, please contact Monica Chiriac at IOM Niger, Tel: +227 8931 8764, Email: mchiriac@iom.int  

Language English Posted: Friday, November 15, 2019 - 16:10Image: Region-Country: NigerThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesDefault: Multimedia: 

Close to 15,000 displaced people have received assistance through the 9-month Japan-funded emergency response project in Tillabéry. Photo: IOM

Close to 15,000 displaced people have received assistance through the 9-month Japan-funded emergency response project in Tillabéry. Photo: IOM

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Statement by the Principals of the Executive Committee of the United Nations Network on Migration

Fri, 11/15/2019 - 10:08

New York – The Principals of the Executive Committee of the United Nations Network on Migration met yesterday (14/11) in New York to discuss United Nations system-wide assistance to Member States in their implementation of the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration (GCM).  

There was strong agreement on the need to reinforce support for both the objectives and guiding principles of the GCM, which is rooted in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.  The Principals called for the roll-out of the Network workplan, at regional and country levels, to ensure that 2020 sees the acceleration of collective efforts to demonstrate the benefits of international cooperation on migration.  

The importance of effective UN support to the regional reviews of the GCM, scheduled for 2020 and as called for by the General Assembly, was also emphasized as they will inform the first International Migration Review Forum in 2022.  

The Principals further reiterated their commitment to joint advocacy on migration-related issues, with a view to highlighting how upholding the rights and well-being of migrants and their communities and building on best practice in accordance with internationally agreed standards, can strengthen migration governance for the benefit of all.  

Finally, the Principals of the Network urged strong donor support for the Migration Trust Fund as a visible means of demonstrating commitment to an inclusive framework of international cooperation on migration, and support for turning words into action.   

Since the Principals last met in May 2019, the Network has formally launched the Fund and received pledges to its initial capitalization.  The Principals and the Network Coordinator, as Chair of the Fund Steering Committee, IOM Director General António Vitorino, thanked all those who have to date pledged.  

The Network has also launched its first workplan to operationalize its support to Member States.  Since its inception, the Network has seen the establishment or revitalization of an increasing number of regional and country-level migration networks and working groups. These mechanisms will help Member States deliver results on the ground in achieving their GCM objectives, with joined up and coherent support from the UN and its partners.    

The UN Network on Migration was established by the UN Secretary-General to ensure coordinated UN system-wide support to States in implementing the GCM.  It comprises 38 entities of the UN system working collectively to support states in addressing their migration priorities, including as regards upholding the rights and well-being of migrants and their communities.   

The Network operates with an Executive Committee of eight UN entities giving overall guidance and setting priorities.  The Executive Committee includes ILO, IOM, OHCHR, UNDESA, UNDP, UNHCR, UNICEF and UNODC, with IOM as the Coordinator and Secretariat to the Network.  

For more information visit: http://migrationnetwork.un.org/ or email: unmignet@iom.int  

 

Language English Posted: Friday, November 15, 2019 - 17:00Image: Region-Country: SwitzerlandThemes: Global Compact on MigrationDefault: Multimedia: 

[L to R] Guy Ryder, ILO Director General, Filippo Grandi, UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), Henrietta H. Fore, Executive Director of UNICEF, Craig Mokhiber, Chief, Development & Economic & Social Issues Branch (DESIB) Research and Right to Development Division, OHCHR NY, António Vitorino, IOM Director General, Achim Steiner, Administrator of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Jean-Luc Lemahieu, Director of the Division for Policy Analysis and Public Affairs (DPA) of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), Maria-Francesca Spatolisano, Assistant Secretary-General for Policy Coordination and Inter-Agency Affairs, Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA). Photo: IOM/2019 

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

More than 20,000 People Displaced by Floods in Bangui, Central African Republic

Thu, 11/14/2019 - 16:32

Bangui – Heavy, unseasonable rains in Bangui, Central African Republic for the past three weeks continue to cause significant material damage, displacing at least 20,500 people and exposing to further danger a population that has weathered repeated cycles of violence since 2013. 

IOM Reporter Videos :  English I French

Like most of the displaced, Beatrice and her five children are being hosted by nearby communities, in her case neighboring Maya-Maya district, which is also partially affected by the floods. Her home has been under water for weeks. 

“The situation is very difficult here,” she said. “The neighbors have sheltered us, but we lack everything, and we can’t sleep as there are too many mosquitoes due to the stagnant water. We have no income and our fields are completely flooded. We are afraid for the coming weeks.” 

Data collected by the International Organization for Migration (IOM)’s Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) reveals close to 20,500 people forced from their homes by the severe weather are now living in host families, adding pressure on a population already suffering from violence and endemic poverty. 

Several other parts of the country have suffered damage, the scale of which is only gradually being revealed. 

IOM has provided 1,000 emergency shelters to internally displaced people. IOM, together with the Central African Red Cross, is currently evaluating the needs of those displaced by the floods but it is clear the delivery of basic health, water, hygiene, emergency shelter and household items remains a priority. 

Last week, DTM carried multi-sector evaluations in the four affected districts of the capital, the majority of which have been partially flooded since rains began on 21 Oct.  The official number of people affected by the floods is expected to rise as the Red Cross, which oversees displacement site management planning, continues to register people living in displacement sites. 

UN agencies such as UNHCR, WFP, WHO, UNFPA and UNICEF have already mobilized aid while international NGOs offer support for water, hygiene, sanitation and health needs. 

The Displacement Tracking Matrix makes it possible to observe the movements of displaced persons, identify their main needs and make referrals for humanitarian assistance. IOM in the C entral Afican Republic plans to launch multi-sectoral needs assessments and a households evaluation. 

For more information, please contact Katia Diperi at IOM Central African Republic: Email: kdiperi@iom.int or Florence Kim at IOM Regional office in Dakar: Tel: +221 78 620 6213; Email: fkim@iom.int 

Language English Posted: Thursday, November 14, 2019 - 16:15Image: Region-Country: Central African RepublicThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesInternally Displaced PersonsMigration and Climate ChangeDefault: Multimedia: 

Data collected by the International Organization for Migration (IOM)’s Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) reveals close to 20,500 people forced from their homes by the severe weather are now living in host families, adding pressure on a population already suffering from violence and endemic poverty.  Photo: IOM/Léo Torreton

Christian Nzengue usually uses his pirogue to fish the Oubangui River. For the past three weeks he has been bailing out friends and neighbours in Maya Maya, as three weeks of unseasonable, heavy rains have turned the streets of Bangui, Central African Republic into canals.

Data collected by the International Organization for Migration (IOM)’s Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) reveals close to 20,500 people forced from their homes by the severe weather are now living in host families, adding pressure on a population already suffering from violence and endemic poverty.

Data collected by the International Organization for Migration (IOM)’s Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) reveals close to 20,500 people forced from their homes by the severe weather are now living in host families, adding pressure on a population already suffering from violence and endemic poverty.

Data collected by the International Organization for Migration (IOM)’s Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) reveals close to 20,500 people forced from their homes by the severe weather are now living in host families, adding pressure on a population already suffering from violence and endemic poverty.

Data collected by the International Organization for Migration (IOM)’s Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) reveals close to 20,500 people forced from their homes by the severe weather are now living in host families, adding pressure on a population already suffering from violence and endemic poverty.

Data collected by the International Organization for Migration (IOM)’s Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) reveals close to 20,500 people forced from their homes by the severe weather are now living in host families, adding pressure on a population already suffering from violence and endemic poverty.

Data collected by the International Organization for Migration (IOM)’s Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) reveals close to 20,500 people forced from their homes by the severe weather are now living in host families, adding pressure on a population already suffering from violence and endemic poverty.

Data collected by the International Organization for Migration (IOM)’s Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) reveals close to 20,500 people forced from their homes by the severe weather are now living in host families, adding pressure on a population already suffering from violence and endemic poverty.

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Young Filmmakers from Spain, Mexico and Jordan Win Top Awards at PLURAL+ Youth Video Festival 2019

Thu, 11/14/2019 - 03:19

New York – Young filmmakers from Spain, Mexico and Jordan whose films covered the themes of migration, diversity, social inclusion, and the prevention of xenophobia won the top awards at the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and United Nations Alliance of Civilizations (UNAOC)’s 11th Awards Ceremony of the PLURAL+ Youth Video Festival at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, yesterday (13/11).

With filmmakers ranging in age from seven to 25, the PLURAL+ 2019 International Jury selected three videos for the top awards: Seeking Refuge (Spain) which follows the story of a young refugee girl as she tries to adapt to life in a new country; Tags (Mexico) which explores the issues of discrimination and pre-conceived notions; and We are Enough: A Message of Girl Empowerment (Jordan) which examines the expectations placed upon women and girls by society.

In addition, the IOM-UNAOC Award for the Prevention of Xenophobia went to the film Brazilian, But Not Soccer Player (Brazil) by Patrick Melo, which addresses with humour the issue of stereotypes against people from different cities, countries, and cultures.

This year, 25 videos out of a record 1,200+ submissions from almost 70 countries received awards. Young filmmakers came to New York from all corners of the world and had the opportunity to screen their films and say a few words to an audience of more than 200, which included Ambassadors, UN representatives, journalists, filmmakers, and youth. The remaining 21 finalists received awards from the many partner organizations of PLURAL+.

IOM Director General, António Vitorino, and the High Representative for the United Nations Alliance of Civilizations (UNAOC), Miguel Ángel Moratinos delivered opening remarks and presented awards to the young filmmakers.

IOM DG Vitorino said, “Today, we recognize two powerful forces — youth and film. Combined, they hold the power to bring about positive change, to shift divisive narratives, to promote peace and dialogue — put simply, to make a better world.”

He added, “The videos that we will screen today are evidence of the resilience of young people. These youth filmmakers have not allowed the negative narratives of migration — so popularized in contemporary media — to rob them of their empathy.”

For the past 11 years, Plural+ has received over than 3,000 video entries from more than 110 countries. Winning videos have been screened at festivals, in schools and at conferences, as well as streamed online and broadcast on television networks around the world. 

Watch webcast of the event here.

Watch PLURAL+2019 winning videos here.

View social media coverage on IOM NY and PLURAL+ Twitter accounts.

For more information, please contact Joseph Held at cjheld@iom.int and Rahma Gamil Soliman at rsoliman@iom.int

Language English Posted: Thursday, November 14, 2019 - 10:08Image: Region-Country: United States of AmericaThemes: Migration and YouthDefault: Multimedia: 

The PLURAL+ 2019 Award Winners who are fighting against all kinds of discrimination, with a camera in their hands, creativity in their minds and passion in their hearts. Photo: PLURAL+ 

IOM Director General, António Vitorino (2nd from right, front row) and UNAOC High Representative Miguel Ángel Moratinos (3rd from right, front row) with the PLURAL+ 2019 winners. Photo: UNAOC 2019

IOM Director General António Vitorino (r) and UNAOC High Representative Miguel Ángel Moratinos (l) during the screening of the winning videos. Photo: UNAOC/IOM 2019

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Joint IOM - UNHCR Press Release - USD 1.35 billion Needed to Help Venezuelan Refugees and Migrants and Host Countries

Wed, 11/13/2019 - 09:12

Geneva, 13 November –The International Organization for Migration (IOM) and the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) will today launch a USD 1.35 billion regional plan to respond to the increasing humanitarian needs of Venezuelan refugees and migrants in Latin America and the Caribbean, and the communities hosting them. 

As of early November 2019, there were approximately 4.6 million refugees and migrants from Venezuela around the world. Nearly 80 per cent are in Latin American and Caribbean countries - with no prospect for return in the short to medium term. If current trends continue, 6.5 million Venezuelans could be outside the country by the end of 2020. 

The 2020 Regional Refugee and Migrant Response Plan (RMRP) being launched in the Colombian capital, Bogotá, is a coordination and a fundraising tool established and implemented by 137 organizations. These are working across the region, aiming to reach almost four million people - including Venezuelan refugees and migrants and host communities - in 17 countries. 

The 2020 RMRP is the result of a wide-ranging field-driven consultation process involving host governments, civil society and faith-based organizations, local communities and donors, as well as refugees and migrants themselves. 

The plan includes actions in nine key sectors: health; education; food security; integration; protection; nutrition; shelter; relief items and humanitarian transport; and water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH). In addition to the emergency response, the 2020 RMRP puts a strong focus on ensuring the social and economic inclusion of refugees and migrants. 

“Only through a coordinated and harmonized approach will it be possible to effectively address the large-scale needs, which continue to increase and evolve as the current crisis deepens,” said Eduardo Stein, Joint UNHCR-IOM Special Representative for Venezuelan refugees and migrants.  

“To this end, the RMRP appeal for 2020 is one of the key instruments to mobilize resources for more collective and concerted action.” 

“Despite many efforts and other initiatives, the dimension of the problem is greater than the current response capacity, so it is necessary that the international community doubles these efforts and contributions to help the countries and international organizations responding to the crisis,” Stein said. “More support to governments is needed, with a focus on development concerns in addition to immediate humanitarian needs.”  

The RMRP 2020 is the product of the Regional Interagency Coordination Platform, the coordination mechanism for the response to the Venezuelan refugee and migrant crisis, is co-led by UNHCR and IOM and involving a wide range of UN, NGO and civil society organizations.  

The RMRP 2020 plan will be available at 16:00 Bogotá time (22:00 CET) at the R4V.info portal

 

For more information contact: 

In Geneva: 

Paul Dillon, IOM (pdillon@iom.int) +41 79 636 9874 

Liz Throssell, UNHCR (throssel@unhcr.org) +41 79 3377591  

 

In Buenos Aires: 

Juliana Quintero, IOM (juquintero@iom.int +54 1132488134) 

 

In Panama:  

William Spindler, UNHCR (spindler@unhcr.org) +507 63827815 

Olga Sarrado, UNHCR (sarrado@unhcr.org) +507 6640 0185 

 

For background information please consult the Regional Inter-Agency Coordination Platform website

Language English Posted: Wednesday, November 13, 2019 - 09:05Image: Region-Country: GlobalThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesDefault: Multimedia: 

Many Venezuelans traveling through the continent do so by foot. Caminantes, or walkers, trek along major highways and through difficult terrain. Many make this journey with just a light jacket, rubber flip flops and a small backpack with the most essential items they manage to carry. Photo: Muse Mohammed/IOM 

Approximately 4.6 million people have left Venezuela in recent years, leading to the largest displacement in Latin America and the Caribbean’s modern history. Growing numbers of people continue to leave Venezuela. Photo: Juliana Quintero/IOM 

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Joint Statement ILO, OECD, IOM and UNICEF - Child Labour and Human Trafficking Remain Important Concerns in Global Supply Chains

Tue, 11/12/2019 - 14:46

New information on child labour, forced labour and human trafficking in global supply chains is revealed in a report compiled by the ILO, OECD, IOM and UNICEF – members of the Alliance 8.7 partnership on child labour, forced labour, modern slavery and human trafficking. 

Geneva - A new report indicates that a significant share of child labour and human trafficking in global supply chains occurs at their lower tiers, in activities such as raw material extraction and agriculture, making due diligence, visibility and traceability challenging.  

The report, Ending child labour, forced labour and human trafficking in global supply chains, provides the first ever estimates of child labour and human trafficking in global supply chains.  

The estimated share of total child labour linked to production in global supply chains varies across regions: 

  • 26 per cent in Eastern and South-Eastern Asia. 
  • 22 per cent in Latin America and the Caribbean.  
  • 12 per cent in Central and Southern Asia. 
  • 12 per cent in Sub-Saharan Africa. 
  • 9 per cent in Northern Africa and Western Asia. 

“The goods and services we buy are composed of inputs from many countries around the world and are processed, assembled, packaged, transported and consumed across borders and markets,” said ILO Director-General Guy Ryder. “This report shows the urgent need for effective action to tackle the violations of core labour rights that are occurring in supply chains.”  

The report outlines several key areas in which governments and businesses can do more.  

It underscores the critical role of States in addressing gaps in statutory legislation, enforcement, and access to justice (which creates space for non-compliance) and in establishing a framework for responsible business conduct. It also examines how Governments can lead by example by integrating due diligence considerations into their own activities as procurers of goods and services, owners of enterprises and providers of credit and loans.  

Speaking at the Paris Peace Forum, OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurria said “These findings, based on an OECD methodology that’s been applied in various economic and environmental contexts, underscore the need for governments to scale up and strengthen efforts to ensure that businesses respect human rights in their operations and across supply chains. Creating an enabling environment for RBC due diligence must be a key action for governments.” 

The report also outlines a broader preventive approach focused on root causes, including child and family deprivation, particularly in the upstream and outsourced segments of global supply chains operating in the informal economy, where risk is greatest. 

“These results make clear that efforts against human trafficking in global supply chains will be inadequate if they do not extend beyond immediate suppliers to include actors upstream engaged in activities such as raw material extraction and agriculture, and serving as inputs to other industries,” said IOM Director General Antonio Vitorino. 

For business, the report underscores the need for a comprehensive, whole-of-supply-chain approach to due diligence, involving the assessment, prevention and mitigation of negative human rights impacts, as well as legitimate channels for remediation in cases in which business has caused or contributed to adverse impacts.  

The estimates were generated by combining data on the estimated total number of children in child labour with data on trade flows and value chains within countries and across borders. The same exercise was carried out for human trafficking. 

“Child labour is a serious violation of child rights that has lifelong negative consequences for children’s physical, mental and social development. This report shows that multiple pressures, including poverty, violence and discrimination, increase a child’s vulnerability to child labour. With our partners we are therefore calling for holistic approach that tackles the root causes of child labour, provides access to quality education and strengthens child protection systems.” said UNICEF Executive Director Henrietta Fore. 

The report was compiled in response to a call by the Group of Twenty (G20) Labour and Employment Ministers to assess violations of core labour rights in global supply chains. It offers a unique interagency perspective on the causes of these human rights violations and on the priorities for governments, businesses and social partners in addressing them. The report was produced by the International Labour Organization (ILO), Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), International Organization for Migration (IOM), and the UN’s children’s agency UNICEF. 

The Alliance 8.7 report will be released globally as part of efforts to accelerate action towards the achievement of Target 8.7 of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which calls on governments around the world to end child labour by 2025 and to put in place effective measures to end forced labour, modern slavery and human trafficking by 2030. 

The corresponding methodology paper will be released shortly. 

The report is available at www.alliance87.org.  

For more information, please contact: 

International Labour Organization:
Please contact the ILO Department of Communication and Public Information at +4122/799-7912, newsroom@ilo.org 

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD):
Please contact Juliet Lawal, OECD Centre for Responsible Business Conduct at +33 1 45 24 97 40, Juliet.LAWAL@oecd.org 

International Organization for Migration:
Please contact Safa Msehli, Media and Communications Division at +41794035526, smsehli@iom.int  

UNICEF:
Please contact Sohini Roychowdhury at +41 22 909 5439, +41 79 533 5264, sroychowdhury@unicef.org 

 

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Report in English:  Ending child labour, forced labour and human trafficking in global supply chains

Rapport en français : Mettre fin au travail des enfants, au travail forcé et à la traite des êtres humains dans les chaînes d'approvisionnement mondiales

Informe en español: Erradicar el trabajo infantil, el trabajo forzoso y la trata de personas en las cadenas mundiales de suministro

 

 

 

 

Language English Posted: Tuesday, November 12, 2019 - 14:11Image: Region-Country: GlobalThemes: Migration and YouthDefault: Multimedia: 

A new report indicates that a significant share of child labour and human trafficking in global supply chains occurs at their lower tiers, in activities such as raw material extraction and agriculture, making due diligence, visibility and traceability challenging

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

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