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Updated: 1 hour 46 min ago

Joint statement by UNHCR and IOM on the appointment of Mr. Eduardo Stein, as a Joint Special Representative for Venezuelan refugees and migrants in the region

Wed, 09/19/2018 - 11:19

Geneva – UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, and the UN Migration Agency (IOM) are pleased to announce the appointment of Mr. Eduardo Stein, as a Joint Special Representative for Venezuelan refugees and migrants in the region.

Mr. Stein brings vast professional experience, political leverage and deep knowledge of the region, which will be fundamental to support national government efforts to deal with the protection and solutions needs of an increasing number of Venezuelan refugees and migrants. Mr. Stein will be promoting a coherent and harmonized regional approach to the Venezuela situation in coordination with national governments, international organizations and other relevant stakeholders.

Mr. Stein will be working closely and reporting directly to both the UNHCR High Commissioner and the IOM Director General. He will work to promote dialogue and consensus necessary for the humanitarian response, including access to territory, refugee protection, legal stay arrangements and the identification of solutions for Venezuelan refugees and migrants.

Language English Posted: Wednesday, September 19, 2018 - 17:11Image: Region-Country: SwitzerlandThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesDefault: Multimedia: 

Mr. Eduardo Stein, Joint Special Representative for Venezuelan refugees and migrants in the region.

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

IOM, Humanitarian Partners Respond to Cholera Outbreak in North-East Nigeria as Death Toll Rises

Tue, 09/18/2018 - 10:51

Maiduguri – According to the latest Situation Report of Cholera Outbreak issued by the Borno State Ministry of Health, 1,533 suspected cholera cases and 31 associated deaths were reported in the north-east Nigerian state from 5 to 17 September.

The State Ministry of Health is coordinating the response to the outbreak in partnership with the Humanitarian Country Team.

As part of the cholera response IOM, the UN Migration Agency, is conducting targeted hygiene promotion and sanitation activities in camp andcamp-like settings. This is directly implemented by IOM camp committees and technical teams. In the Konduga, Maiduguri, Jere, Dikwa and Gwoza local government areas (LGAs), IOM teams sensitized 2,726 households (around 15,000 people) to improve hygiene practices through house to house visits, mass campaigns and focus group discussions. Construction of additional hygiene and sanitation facilities such as latrines and showers are ongoing in Konduga and Jere, which are high cholera-risk LGAs. 

"We realize that as youths we can bring positive change towards curbing cholera in Gubio by encouraging proper utilization of sanitation facilities that are in the camps,” said a young man during a sensitization session on cholera prevention in Gubio, Maiduguri.

In addition, IOM continues to implement standard Camp Coordination and Camp Management (CCCM) activities to facilitate equitable access to services among the affected population as well as timely mapping and referral of gaps in the provision of assistance, reaching more than 680,000 displaced individuals across 110 camp and camp-like settings in Borno State. IOM is co-leading the CCCM sector in north-east Nigeria.

“Detecting and responding rapidly to suspected cases of cholera is vital to controlling outbreaks, which can spread rapidly,” said Fouad Diab, IOM Nigeria Emergency Coordinator, following the release of the latest situation report. “We are working towards ensuring that basic hygiene practices, including use of clean and safe water and proper sanitation are promoted among internally displaced persons (IDPs) and host communities,” he added. 

The Government is also disseminating prevention messages to combat the water-borne disease through local radio stations in Hausa, Kanuri, Shuwa and Bura languages.

Before the outbreak was officially announced, IOM had been conducting sanitation, hygiene promotion and cholera preparedness activities in the north-east. Since the beginning of 2018, IOM has reached 64,700 individuals with targeted WASH services in Borno State. 

Additional resources are urgently needed to strengthen the response and mitigate the risk of the outbreak spreading to other areas. Partners are currently using existing resources from regular emergency operations. These are not enough for a full-scale response.

Borno State is at the heart of the ongoing conflict in north-east Nigeria, a region where, according to recent assessments, 1,926,748 people are displaced, up from 1.7 million at the start of 2018. Up to 79 per cent of IDPs in the region are women and children.

For more information, please contact Jorge Galindo at IOM Nigeria, Tel: +234 906 273 9168, Email: jgalindo@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 16:50Image: Region-Country: NigeriaThemes: Capacity BuildingHumanitarian EmergenciesMigration HealthDefault: Multimedia: 

IOM team conducts a hygiene promotion session for IDPs in Bama, Borno State. Photo: IOM

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

UN Agencies Launch Environmental Protection and Resilience Project for Host Communities and Refugees in Bangladesh

Tue, 09/18/2018 - 10:50

Cox’s Bazar – Families living in the world’s largest refugee camp in the past week received the first 2,500 stoves and liquid petroleum gas (LPG) cylinders that are part of a United Nations project to protect the environment and build resilience for people living in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh.

The “SAFE Plus” (Safe Approaches to Fuel and Energy Plus Landscape Restoration and Livelihoods) project, which aims to ultimately provide 125,000 host community and refugee families with LPG stoves to prevent further deforestation caused by cutting firewood for cooking, is a partnership between the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), Migration Agency (IOM) and World Food Programme (WFP.)

When some 700,000 Rohingya refugees fled to Cox’s Bazar in August last year to escape violence in Myanmar, much of the area’s protected forest was cut down for fuel and shelter, dramatically increasing the risk of flooding and landslides due to soil erosion.

The new LPG stoves will allow families to safely cook without needing to gather firewood from depleted forests. They will also improve the safety of women and children, who risk gender-based violence and attacks from animals, when they collect firewood. Additionally, they will reduce health risks caused by smoke inhalation from open fires.

Host community and refugee families with LPG stoves will receive the fuel that they need through WFP’s ‘multi-wallet’ transfer solution. The agency’s SCOPE beneficiary and transfer management platform identifies recipients through biometric authentication and ensures that the assistance they receive is accurately recorded and managed. ‘Fuel wallets’ on their SCOPE assistance cards will record the LPG they receive, together with food and other items.

“Creating sustainable access to LPG for cooking is the critical piece in the jigsaw of addressing deforestation and reforestation,” said Peter Agnew, FAO Programme Manager in Bangladesh. “It eliminates the demand for firewood, which in turn allows us to replant deforested areas with confidence, knowing that new trees will not be dug up and sold as kindling.”

“Enabling access to alternative fuel sources encourages more environmentally sustainable practices. Deforestation is a major concern. Furthermore, families predominantly cook indoors, so we are quite concerned about the impact of smoke from cooking fires on people’s respiratory health,” said IOM Emergency Coordinator Manuel Pereira.

“We know limited access to firewood results in coping strategies such as undercooking food,” said WFP Emergency Coordinator Peter Guest. “We are therefore strengthening food security by giving people better and safer access to fuel. The SCOPE platform is helping both WFP and our UN partners to deliver humanitarian assistance more efficiently.”

Today, there are over 919,000 Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh. These refugees, as well as Bangladeshi host communities, number at least 1.3 million people and rely on humanitarian assistance to meet their basic needs.

The SAFE Plus initiative is supported by Ireland, Japan and the United States of America and assists the work of the Government of Bangladesh, notably the Refugee Relief and Repatriation Commission under the Ministry of Disaster Relief and Management.

For further information and interviews please contact:
Fiona MacGregor at IOM Cox’s Bazar, Tel. +8801733335221, Email: FMacGregor@iom.int
Peter Agnew at FAO Cox’s Bazar, Tel. +8801734931946, Email: Peter.Agnew@fao.org
Manmeet Kaur at WFP Cox’s Bazar, Tel. +8801713750599, Email: Manmeet.Kaur@wfp.org

Language English Posted: Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 16:48Image: Region-Country: BangladeshThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesMigration and EnvironmentRohingya CrisisDefault: Multimedia: 

Johura Kathun, 45, a widow with three children, receives an LPG stove in Balukhali camp. Photo: Tazbir Tanim / WFP 2018

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals Reach 77,555; Deaths Reach 1,723

Tue, 09/18/2018 - 10:48

Geneva – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, reports that 77,555 migrants and refugees entered Europe by sea in 2018 through 17 September, with 33,611 to Spain, the leading destination this year.

This compares with 131,884 arrivals across the region through the same period last year, and 298,663 through a similar point (13 September) in 2016. 

Spain, with over 43 per cent of all irregular arrivals on the Mediterranean through this year, has outpaced

Greece and Italy throughout the summer.

Italy’s arrivals to date – 20,777 – are the lowest recorded by IOM since 2014, lower in fact, than arrivals recorded by Italian authorities during many individual months over the past five years. The same can be said for Greece, whose totals for irregular migrant arrivals through the first week of September this year (22,153) recently surpassed arrivals to Italy. It is the first time that has happened since the early spring of 2016.  

ITALY

IOM Italy released data Monday on irregular arrivals from North Africa (see chart below) through mid-September. According to the latest figures, 20,777 irregular migrants have arrived by sea to Italy this year, 79.7 percent less than the same period last year. Libya remains the main departure country. Migrant rescues occurred in the Channel of Sicily and then brought to Sicily (main ports: Catania, Augusta, Porto Empedocle, Pozzallo, Trapani, Palermo, Lampedusa).

The 700 irregular migrants who arrived from 1-17 September represent an average of fewer than 32 per day – compared to averages of over 2,009 per day last September and 566 per day the September before that. According to IOM data collected during the current Mediterranean emergency, during peak summer months in 2016 and 2017, daily arrivals to Italy frequently surpassed 750. 

IOM staff are deployed at the main landing points in Sicily (including Lampedusa), Calabria and Apulia where they provide legal assistance to those arriving by sea, monitor the reception conditions and support the authorities in the identification of vulnerable groups. 

SPAIN

IOM Spain’s Ana Dodevska reported Monday that 33,611 irregular migrants have arrived by sea this year via the Western Mediterranean; of those, some 10,680 arrived since the start of August. For the first 16 days of September, irregular migration arrivals on the Western Mediterranean route were running at a rate of 267 per day (see chart below). 

Search and rescue operations

GREECE

On Monday, IOM Athens’ Christine Nikolaidou wrote that from Friday, 14 September to date, the Hellenic Coast Guard (HCG) reported that there were at least 12 incidents requiring search and rescue operations off the islands of Lesvos, Chios, Rhodes and Kos. The HCG rescued a total of 573 migrants and transferred them to the respective islands.

A total of 22,153 irregular migrants have arrived in Greece by sea thus far in 2018. See Tables below for further details.

IOM staff are present in Lesvos, Samos, Chios, Leros, Kos and Crete Island, working closely with authorities (Frontex, the Hellenic Coast Guard and the First Reception Service) to identify vulnerable migrants including unaccompanied minors, elderly migrants, migrants with medical needs and families with children. Vulnerable groups are referred to authorities in order to be provided with the necessary care.

IOM’s Missing Migrants Project has documented the deaths of 2,716 people migrating to international destinations in 2018.

Most recently, three people died in the Eastern Mediterranean when trying to reach Greece. On the night of 16 September, a boat in which 19 people were trying to reach the Greek island of Kos capsized near Bağlar Bay in Bodrum, Turkey. The Turkish Coast Guard saved 16 survivors (including 8 children and 6 women) and recovered the remains of two women. Another woman remains missing.

In the Western Mediterranean, a woman drowned when the boat in which she was travelling capsized in the Alboran Sea on 16 September. The Spanish rescue services managed to rescue 54 survivors from the sinking boat.

On 13 September, the remains of three migrants, including one woman, washed up on the shores of Beni Ensar, Morocco. Their bodies were taken to the morgue of Hassani Hospital in Nador, according to local NGOs.

Additionally, the Missing Migrants Project team, based on information received from Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), recorded the deaths of 130 migrants on 1 September in a shipwreck off the coast of Al Khums, Libya. A group of 276 people, among them survivors of the shipwreck, were disembarked in Al Khums on 2 September. An MSF medical team provided urgent medical assistance to 18 survivors and collected their testimonies. It was reported that 165 adults and 20 children were on board the boat (185 people in total), while only 55 survived. Two bodies were recovered by the Libyan Coast Guard. This indicates that 128 people went missing and presumably drowned in the shipwreck, including 20 children, according to survivors’ testimonies.

In Europe, a 24-year-old Eritrean migrant was stabbed in a parking lot near the E40 highway, in Wetteren, Belgium on 12 September. On the border between the United States and Mexico, migrants keep dying in ones and twos, often due to the hardships of the journey itself. On 11 September, US Border Patrol agents found the remains of a man who had died of dehydration in the Jacumba mountains, California. The day after, they assisted a pregnant woman and a man who got lost in the Yuha desert, California, both suffering from dehydration. Tragically, the man died before reaching the hospital. On 15 September, the body of a man was recovered from the Río Bravo by Mexican civil protection authorities.

In the first two weeks of September, at least four migrants lost their lives while transiting through Mexico. Migrants who cross Mexico to reach the border with the United States are exposed to disproportionate levels of risk of human rights violations, disappearance and death.

On 7 September, the remains of a man were found on the side of the highway between Monterrey and Reynosa, near the municipality of General Bravo in Nuevo León. He is believed to have been part of a group of 300 migrants who were detained by Mexican migration agents a few days earlier while travelling in a truck.

Although various sources suggest that migrants are dying in large numbers along the migrant trail in Mexico, the scale of deaths is difficult to measure. The discovery of mass graves containing the remains of migrants of Central America origin give evidence of the growing number of migrants who disappear in the context of their journeys through Mexico.

Most recently, the remains of 9 Guatemalan migrants who were found in a clandestine grave in February 2015 were identified. The last time their families heard from them had been on 16 February 2014. One year later, a clandestine grave containing the remains of 16 people was discovered in the municipality of Güémez, Tamaulipas. In July 2018, the State Attorney General’s Office notified the families that their missing relatives were among those found in this grave. Families of these nine men had to wait for three years and six months to find out what happened to their loved ones. Tragically, the families of many missing migrants may never receive any confirmation of life or death, never fully able to grieve their loss.

A recent report by the Mexican Commission for the Protection and Promotion of Human Rights estimated that 390 clandestine burial sites were discovered in 23 Mexican states between 2009 and 2014, containing 1,418 bodies and 5,768 unidentified remains. Unfortunately, there is no national register of clandestine graves and no effective system in place to identify and link missing persons and unidentified bodies recovered.

Missing Migrants Project data are compiled by IOM staff but come from a variety of sources, some of which are unofficial. To learn more about how data on migrant deaths and disappearances are collected, click here.

For latest arrivals and fatalities in the Mediterranean, please visit: http://migration.iom.int/europe 
Learn more about the Missing Migrants Project at: http://missingmigrants.iom.int 

For more information, please contact: 
Joel Millman at IOM HQ, Tel: +41 79 103 8720, Email: jmillman@iom.int 
Flavio Di Giacomo, IOM Coordination Office for the Mediterranean, Italy, Tel: +39 347 089 8996, Email: fdigiacomo@iom.int 
Ana Dodevska, IOM Spain, Tel: +34 91 445 7116, Email: adodevska@iom.int  
Hicham Hasnaoui, IOM Morocco, Tel: + 212 5 37 65 28 81, Email: hhasnaoui@iom.int 
Atigoni Avgeropoulou, IOM Greece, Tel: +30 210 99 19 040 (Ext. 166); Mobile: +30 69 48 92 98 09 
Email: aavgeropoulou@iom.int 
Christine Nikolaidou, IOM Greece, Tel: +30 210 99 19 040 ext. 248, Email: cnikolaidou@iom.int 
Kelly Namia, IOM Greece, Tel: +30 210 991 2174, Email: knamia@iom.int 
Ivona Zakoska, IOM Regional DTM, Austria, Tel: + +43 1 5812222, Email: izakoska@iom.int 
Julia Black, IOM GMDAC, Germany, Tel: +49 30 278 778 27, Email: jblack@iom.int 
Christine Petré, IOM Libya. Tel. +216 29 240 448 Email: chpetre@iom.int 
Myriam Chabbi, IOM Tunisia, Mobile: +216 28 78 78 05, Tel: +216 71 860 312 (Ext. 109), Email: mchabbi@iom.int 
Dimitrios Tsagalas, IOM Cyprus, Tel: + 22 77 22 70, E-mail: dtsagalas@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 16:29Image: Region-Country: SwitzerlandThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesMissing MigrantsDefault: Multimedia:  Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

IOM Trains Health Providers to Care for Victims of Trafficking, Migrants in Vulnerable Situations

Tue, 09/18/2018 - 10:28

Nairobi – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, under the Better Migration Management (BMM) programme and the EU-IOM Joint Initiative for Migrant Protection and Reintegration in the Horn of Africa, conducted a five-day Training of Trainers for health care providers. The training, which focused on care for victims of trafficking and mental health considerations for migrants in vulnerable situations, ran from 10 to 14 September 2018.

The training was designed to help participants understand and care for trafficked persons, and to better manage mental health conditions for migrants in vulnerable situations. It brought together representatives from the Ministries of Health, as well as professionals working to provide protection services in Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan and Uganda. After the workshop, participants are expected to roll out this training in their places of work with the support of IOM staff in the respective countries.

Migrants’ journeys on the Western-Northern, Eastern and Southern routes out of Africa are difficult and often dangerous. Often, migrants travel on foot for hundreds of kilometres through dangerous territories and at the mercy of smuggler networks; they are faced with challenges such as lack of access to basic needs, extortion, discrimination, psychological, physical and sexual abuse and even death.

Throughout the years, IOM has supported various activities in the East and Horn of Africa region to assist vulnerable migrants and victims of trafficking.

Speaking at the launch of the training, Gordon Kihalangwa, the Principal Secretary in the Kenyan Ministry of Interior and Chairman of the National Coordination Mechanism commended the work of IOM, in particular under BMM. He especially praised the assistance provided to vulnerable migrants, including victims of trafficking.  He called on actors to address the push and pull factors for migration in the region: “You are going to meet people who have lost self-esteem, [and had] their travel documents taken away. You should not add more miseries and distress… rather try to alleviate their suffering.”

Jeffrey Labovitz, IOM Regional Director for East and Horn of Africa, emphasized the need to give participants the right tools to understand the phenomenon of human trafficking and smuggling of migrants as well as to recognize some of the health problems associated with trafficking and migrants in vulnerable situations. He also urged them to use appropriate approaches when providing health care to trafficked persons and migrants in vulnerable situations.

The programmes, Better Migration Management and the EU-IOM Joint Initiative Programme in the Horn of Africa, aim to support the African member countries of the Khartoum Process. The BMM programme is funded by the EU Emergency Trust Fund for Africa and the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ). Both programmes strengthen the assistance to vulnerable migrants, including victims of trafficking and returnees, with specialised protection services in the Horn of Africa countries.

For more information please contact the IOM Regional Office in Nairobi:
Julia Hartlieb, Tel: +254 734 988 846, Email: jhartlieb@iom.int; or Wilson Johwa, Tel:  +254 20 4221 112, Email: wjohwa@iom.int.

Language English Posted: Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 16:27Image: Region-Country: KenyaThemes: Capacity BuildingCounter-TraffickingMigration HealthDefault: Multimedia: 

At the end of a week-long training in psychosocial first aid for vulnerable migrants, some of the participants show their certificates. Photo: Wilson Johwa/IOM 2018

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

“Clear” Messaging Campaign Against Extremism Launches in Uganda

Tue, 09/18/2018 - 10:27

Kampala –  IOM, the UN Migration Agency has launched a major messaging campaign focused on preventing violent extremism in the Ugandan capital Kampala, with officials urging young people to pursue their dreams with patience, determination and peace.

The “Beera Clear” campaign has been organized by the Strengthening Social Cohesion and Stability in Slum Populations (SSCoS) project, which is funded by the European Union.

Speaking at the launch in Kampala, Ali Abdi, IOM Uganda Chief of Mission, explained why the project was putting emphasis on expanding opportunities for young people in the city’s informal settlements. He suggested that youth were more vulnerable to being radicalized if they were marginalized and desperate.

“We believe, and the donor believes, that if young people have [such] support, if more and more young people have something to lose, they will not risk it. They will not get involved in radicalization and other forms of communal violence,” he said.

Thomas Tiedemann, the European Union Delegation’s Head of Governance and Human Rights, said that besides providing young men and women with skills and support to start their businesses, the project was empowering them to take charge of their futures. He added that radicalization and extremism happen in our midst, but we cannot recognize or detect them; hence, the campaign.

“Through our messaging we call upon [young people] to make the right choices and to stand against all types of violence,” Tiedemann said. “We wish to contribute to raising awareness about different types of violence, how they happen and how we can detect them, so as to empower the community at large, to prevent violence and to intervene to counter violence.”

Funded at EUR 4.3 million over three and a half years, the SSCoS project started in August 2016 and aims to address the root causes of radicalization. It is implemented by IOM and its partners in the Kampala areas of Bwaise, Kisenyi, Kabalagala and Katwe. It combines socio-economic support to slum youth with logistical facilitation and capacity building of key state agencies such as the Police.

The “Beera Clear” (loosely translated to mean ‘Be Clear’ or ‘Be law-abiding’) campaign urges slum dwellers to “Stand against violence.” This messaging is backed by baseline findings that marginalized, poor young people were more vulnerable to being radicalized.

Assistant Inspector General of Police Asan Kasingye, who represented the state minister for internal affairs, also urged young people to refrain from violence. But he pledged that the Police would strive to observe human rights of young people, while sensitizing them to stay away from violence.

“I want to [ask], on behalf of the Uganda Police, […] can we be clear about protection of young people, especially their human rights?” Kasingye said, attracting applause from the crowd during the launch event.

As part of the messaging campaign, the SSCoS project is running infomercials on radio and television, and has organized a youth theatre festival, as well as various outreach events in the project areas, promoting both peaceful ambition and ambitious peace.

For more information please contact Richard M Kavuma at IOM Uganda, Tel: +256 312 263 210, Email: rmkavuma@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 16:26Image: Region-Country: UgandaThemes: IOMDefault: Multimedia: 

Ali Abdi, Thomas Tiedemann and Asan Kasingye dance during the launch of Beera Clear messaging campaign in Kampala, 14 September 2018. Photo: IOM

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

IOM, Nippon Foundation Provide Protection for Victims of Trafficking in Madagascar

Tue, 09/18/2018 - 10:25

Antananarivo – Representatives of the Malagasy Government, led by the Minister for Social Affairs Lucien Irmah Naharimamy; IOM, the UN Migration Agency; and partners proceeded to inaugurate the first victims of trafficking (VoTs) shelter in Madagascar.

A significant number of Malagasy nationals fall prey to traffickers nationally and transnationally. Children, trafficked internally and primarily from rural areas, are subjected to domestic servitude, prostitution, forced begging, and forced labour in the mining, fishing, and agriculture sectors. Women and men, who are trafficked both within Madagascar and internationally, face labour and sexual exploitation.

In the first six months of the year alone, IOM assisted with the repatriation and return of a record 126 victims of trafficking from the Gulf countries and Asia, in coordination with the Malagasy Government and authorities in the countries of destination. Most of the time, upon their return to Madagascar, the VoTs are left to fend for themselves, as social workers lack basic options to provide a safe space and assistance services that are catered to the particular needs of VoTs (including first response to emotional distress and the effects of physical abuses and trauma).

The “Mitsinho” shelter is located in a central neighbourhood of the capital city Antananarivo. It is the first of its kind, and will provide identified VoTs with first care and secure temporary accommodation. It provides a much needed space where VoTs can have a moment of pause, and benefit from a range of assistance and counselling, including legal counselling, delivered by well-trained social workers and assistance professionals. The individuals can also reconnect with their families in a neutral environment.

On the occasion of the official inauguration of the shelter, IOM and the Ministry of Social Affairs presented the short participatory film directed and produced by a group of VoTs. The group members overcame their fears to tell their stories in their own words, and help raise awareness of a subject that remains hidden or treated as taboo in many communities. At the end of the year, during the 3rd edition of the Global Migration Film Festival, an international version of the participatory film will be screened around the world.

The rehabilitation of the shelter and the training of social workers has been made possible with support from the Nippon Foundation through the IOM Sasakawa Endowment Fund. Acknowledging the funding, IOM Madagascar Chief of Mission Daniel Silva noted that “it illustrates the commitment of principled private businesses to contribute to respond proactively and effectively to one of the most brutal migration management issues of our time: trafficking in persons.”

Globally, since the mid-1990s, IOM and its partners have provided protection and assistance to close to 100,000 trafficked persons, including 8,700 in 2017. IOM takes a comprehensive approach to addressing human trafficking. In Madagascar this effort complements IOM’s multiyear support to the Government of Madagascar and civil society organizations, aimed at enhancing the criminal justice system’s response through victim-centred investigations and prosecutions of trafficking cases; strengthening coordination of the national anti-trafficking response; and improving data collection and reporting.

For more information please contact Daniel Silva y Poveda at IOM Madagascar; Tel: +261.32 56 54 954, Email: dsilva@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 16:24Image: Region-Country: MadagascarThemes: Counter-TraffickingDefault: Multimedia: 

The Minister for Social Affairs and officials unveil the inauguration plate for the rehabilitated VoT shelter. Photo: IOM

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

IOM Conducts First Climate Data Tracking in Lake Chad Basin

Tue, 09/18/2018 - 10:23

Dakar – In August 2018 IOM, the UN Migration Agency, conducted the first climate data collection and tracking exercise in the four countries around the Lake Chad Basin –  Cameroon, Chad, Niger and Nigeria – to gather baseline data on the nexus between climate change, conflict, migration and livelihoods.

Throughout the region, 3,685 households and 475 key informants were interviewed in locations selected based on their proximity to the Lake and their experience of climate events and conflict.

The overall findings of the exercise showed that across the four countries and regardless of the interviewees’ status (host community members, internally displaced persons, returnees, migrants, refugees), a change in temperature, rainfall and ecosystems was perceived by all.  Among the households interviewed, 85 per cent of respondents in Cameroon, 71 per cent in Chad, 42 per cent in Nigeria and 82 per cent in Niger indicated experiencing an increase in temperature over the course of the past decade. Some respondents also noticed more erratic temperature patterns, impacting the traditional knowledge of the climate which sustained livelihood activities in the region for centuries.

“Though we’re just scratching the surface of the mountain of analysis to be done on climate induced migration, this pilot project has shown that we are able to draw interesting correlations that will help policy makers, humanitarian and development actors respond to emerging or previously unknown needs of affected populations,” said Cecilia Mann, the project manager. “This is a step towards breaching the humanitarian/development divide and establishing early warning mechanisms and preparedness measures to the changes that continue to affect our planet,” she continued.

In Cameroon, 96 per cent of the respondents perceived a decrease in rainfall compared to 45 per cent in Chad and 73 per cent in Nigeria. In Niger, 77 percent noted decreased rainfall and 14 per cent noted erratic rainfall patterns over the course of the last decade. Households in all four countries perceived a change in ecosystems primarily characterized by a disappearance of plant and animal species (98 per cent in Cameroon, 53 per cent in Chad, 73 per cent in Nigeria and 94 per cent in Chad).

Additionally, a change in livelihood practices was attributed to a decrease in resource availability and accessibility, due both to changing climatic factors and the Boko Haram insurgency. Many respondents also indicated a lack of access to livelihood activities and/or a dependence on humanitarian assistance in the four countries. Though respondents did perceive changed migration trends over the course of the past decade, very few indicated migration desires. 

Much of the climate induced displacement in the region was attributed to cyclical movement, and conflict-induced migration was a primary driver.  In Cameroon, 53 per cent of respondents indicated having been forced to flee their villages (of which over 50 per cent left because of climate-related factors). However, only 8 per cent indicated a desire to move again and none indicated plans to move internationally. 

In Chad, 82 per cent of respondents indicated having been forced to flee. However, only 1 per cent cited reasons that are directly correlated to climate change. Similarly, in Nigeria, 92 per cent of respondents indicated having been forced to flee their area of origin but only 7 per cent cited reasons linked directly to climate change. No intention for international migration was cited by respondents and all those planning to migrate again planned to return to their areas of origin. In Niger, 54 per cent of respondents indicated having fled from their area of origin, of which 3 per cent indicated reasons directly linked to climate change.

The findings of this project, funded by the IOM Development Fund (IDF), support the notion that an important driver of conflict in the region is resource availability, which in turn links to both environmental change and to livelihoods.  A detailed report of the findings will be available through IOM’s Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) online portals in October 2018 and the final project report including the qualitative portion and policy recommendations will be available in November 2018.

For more information, please contact at Cecilia Mann at IOM Central African Republic, Email: cmann@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 16:21Image: Region-Country: SenegalThemes: Migration and Climate ChangeMigration and EnvironmentDefault: Multimedia: 

Decreased rainfalls over the last decade have forced thousands of people to flee their homes in the Lake Chad Basin. Photo: Muse Mohammed/IOM

Household interview on Climate, Migration and Conflict in Hile Alifa, Cameroon. Photo: IOM 

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

IOM Donates Personal Protective Equipment Kits to Government Hospital in Tanzania

Tue, 09/18/2018 - 10:21

Kigoma – Due to the recent resurgence of Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) cases in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), one of the six countries bordering the United Republic of Tanzania, the Government has increased its efforts to prevent EVD cases entering Tanzania by strengthening disease surveillance measures at both airport and land entry points in the country.

As per a Government health official, Dar Es Salaam faces the highest risk because 60 per cent of the 1,526 travelers who came to Tanzania from the DRC in the last month went to the city. Other at-risk regions include Mwanza, Kagera, Kigoma, Katavi, Rukwa and Songwe. Currently there are no Ebola cases in Tanzania.

Following an IOM medical team’s recent visit to the Kigoma Port, at the border between Tanzania and the DRC, it was recognized that there were a limited number of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) kits for the medical officers carrying out the surveillance activities at the port’s entry point. An average of 30 cargo ships pass through the Kigoma Port per month, arriving from the DRC, Zambia and Burundi. These cargo ships also bring passengers.

For this reason IOM, the UN Migration Agency, decided to donate 24 PPE kits which will be used at all the land entry points between the two countries but particularly for the Kigoma Port. A PPE kit consists of a gown, a pair of gloves, a pair of goggles and a mask.

Practicing good hand hygiene is another effective method for preventing the spread of the Ebola virus. “Proper hand hygiene means washing hands often with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand sanitizer,” said Dr. Qasim Sufi, IOM Tanzania’s Chief of Mission. He also added that Ebola vaccines are currently in the trial stages.

IOM strives to continue working with the Government of Tanzania in its effort to prevent EVD’s entry into Tanzania and increase regional preparedness.

Its Migration Health Division (MHD), acquired solid experience of EVD response of during the 2013-2016 Ebola outbreak in West Africa that has been recognized as one of the largest, deadliest and most complex public health emergencies of our time. It had devastating effects — from the sheer amount of human lives lost, to the suffering, fear, mental trauma, stigma, and sacrifices that many had to endure, as well as the economic, social, and political costs. IOM’s role in the response to the outbreak was unprecedented in the Organization’s history, as it became a major actor in the provision of humanitarian health-care services. Hundreds of staff members were deployed to the three most affected countries, namely Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, and also to neighbouring countries, such as Mali, where transmission was low or rapidly contained.

IOM is currently one of the humanitarian agencies responding to the outbreak of EVD in the DRC.

For more information please contact IOM Tanzania:
Bernard Opare, Tel: +255 699798 571, Email: bopare@iom.int
Yoko Fujimura, Tel: +255 757 101 603, Email: yfujimura@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 16:18Image: Region-Country: United Republic of TanzaniaThemes: Migration HealthDefault: Multimedia: 

Donation of Personal Protective Equipment kits to IOM staff in Kigoma, Tanzania. Photo: IOM

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

UN Migration Agency Strengthens Preparations for Peak Hurricane Season in Haiti, Caribbean

Fri, 09/14/2018 - 11:53

Port-au-Prince – With peak hurricane season arriving in early September, the UN Migration Agency (IOM) in Haiti is intensifying its emergency preparedness capacity thanks to additional funding from the European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations (ECHO).

The new funding provided by ECHO will allow IOM to have ready for distribution hygiene and kitchen items for 2,500 vulnerable families as well as home repair materials. This stock will total 12,500 kits, added to the relief items previously donated by the US Office for Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA).

For the vulnerable Caribbean nation of Haiti, which shares the island of Hispaniola with the Dominican Republic, hurricane preparedness remains more critical than ever. It only takes one major storm to decimate the island for months, sometimes causing irreparable damage as witnessed in the agriculture sector following the passage of Hurricane Matthew in 2016.

“Thanks to this new grant from ECHO, IOM will preposition additional non-food item (NFI) stocks in Port-au-Prince and in the regions. IOM has a long-lasting experience in emergency response in Haiti; we are prepared,” said Bernard Lami, Head of Operations for the UN Migration Agency in Haiti.

With the funds provided by the European Union, IOM will also renew the response capacities of the Directorate of Civil Protection (DPC) in warehouse maintenance management as well as emergency preparedness and response and bolster the DPC ability to provide emergency support to its Caribbean neighbours following a storm.

“This week as multiple storms entered the Caribbean basin, we remain prepared for the worst while hoping for the best scenario,” said Giuseppe Loprete, IOM Haiti’s Chief of Mission. “Thanks to our strong partnership with Haitian authorities, ECHO and IOM are ready to deploy NFIs across the country as well as to neighbouring Caribbean countries for an immediate response,” he added.

To further support the government’s preparedness capacity building, IOM staff also participated in the SIMEX exercise which took place on 2-3 August 2018 and simulated the passage of a Category 4 storm named Hurricane Peter. This year, the SIMEX exercise occurred throughout seven sites across Haiti.

In preparation for the peak of the hurricane season, the Government of Haiti and UN agencies will apply the lessons learned from the SIMEX exercise and remain on high alert until the season ends on 30 November 2018.

For further information, please contact Emily Bauman, IOM Haiti Communications Focal Point, Tel: + 509 3783 5424, Email: ebauman@iom.int

Language English Posted: Friday, September 14, 2018 - 11:50Image: Region-Country: HaitiThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesDefault: Multimedia: 

IOM staff distribute relief items to displaced persons in Malfety, Haiti during Hurricane Irma (September 2017). Photo: IOM

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Shorter Tuberculosis Treatment Will Help Migrants, Says IOM in Tajikistan

Fri, 09/14/2018 - 11:50

Dushanbe – Rapid tuberculosis (TB) diagnostics methods and new drugs for drug-resistant forms of TB with short-term treatment regimens were at the centre stage of a two-day conference on Integrated Tuberculosis Control in Central Asia which concluded in the Tajik capital Dushanbe today (14/09).

These new approaches are giving hope, especially for the growing migrant population in the region.

“Interrupted treatment has been one of the critical factors exacerbating the TB burden and contributing to the development of TB drug resistance throughout Central Asia,” noted Dr. Jaime Calderon, IOM’s Senior Regional Health Advisor for South Eastern Europe, Eastern Europe and Central Asia. “Shorter regimens definitely increase the chance that treatment is completed.”

The region hosts millions of migrant workers, who seek work predominantly within the region and in the Russian Federation. Migrants remain particularly vulnerable to the disease due to their living and economic conditions and face structural barriers regarding healthcare.

Dr. Calderon added, “If we want to end TB and ensure that we reach the objective set out in the UN Sustainable Development Goals of leaving no one behind, access to timely TB diagnosis and treatment and continuity of care in host countries and at home are indispensable.”

The Europe/Central Asia region bears the highest proportion of multi drug-resistant TB globally, and IOM recently contributed to the development of two landmark documents. The United Nations Common Position on ending TB, HIV and Viral Hepatitis confirms that collaboration between sectors is essential to address social, environmental and economic factors that affect people’s health.

The Global Compact for Migration commits signatories to incorporating the health needs of migrants in national and local health care policies and plans, by strengthening capacities for service provision, facilitating affordable and non-discriminatory access, reducing communication barriers, and training health care providers on culturally sensitive service delivery. 

“The Global Compact establishes a migrant-centred approach to the challenges posed by migration,” observed Dr. Calderon.

This week’s event was co-organized by the Ministry of Health and Social Protection of the Republic of Tajikistan, the National TB Programme and USAID. Later this month IOM will join a high-profile event focused on HIV, TB and viral Hepatitis in Europe and Central Asia at the United Nations General Assembly in New York.

For more information please contact Rukhshona Qurbonova at IOM Tajikistan, Tel: +992 90 505 43 00, Email: rqurbonova@iom.int

Language English Posted: Friday, September 14, 2018 - 11:47Image: Region-Country: TajikistanThemes: Migration HealthDefault: Multimedia: 

New treatment regimens for TB patients will greatly benefit migrant health. Photo: IOM/ Florian Bachmeier         

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Statistics Office, IOM, UNFPA Launch Demographic Survey of Iraq’s Kurdistan Region

Fri, 09/14/2018 - 11:47

Erbil – The Kurdistan Region Statistics Office (KRSO), UNFPA, and IOM yesterday (13/09) launched the Demographic Survey of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq (KRI), one of the largest statistical exercises conducted in the region since 1987.

The survey provides a comprehensive profile of the current population demographics, employment and income, housing, household possessions, literacy and education levels. This socio-demographic study gathered information from 12,699 households, including long-term residents and displaced families in the three KRI governorates of Duhok, Erbil and Sulaymaniyah.

This research is timely as it comes at a point where the country is emerging from the conflict and economic hardship, while a significant portion of displaced families have returned or are considering going back home. The 2014-2017 war against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) has had a severe impact on the Kurdistan Region: from the start of the crisis, KRI has provided refuge to more than one million displaced Iraqis and continues to host more than 800,000 internally displaced persons.

Dr. Ali Sindi, Minister of Planning for the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG), said, “The information in this survey establishes a reference base for future statistical studies, and will assist the Kurdistan Regional Government with better planning and allocation of resources.”

Gerard Waite, IOM Chief of Mission said, “This survey is a true collaborative effort with the KRG and UNFPA and hopefully will contribute to addressing the needs of the most vulnerable households, in this critical post-crisis period.”
 
Ramanathan Balakrishnan, UNFPA Representative to Iraq added, “This demographic survey fulfils the need for updated population and socio-economic statistics and will serve as a roadmap for future policy development and planning with KRG and partners.”

 The survey was made possible through the collaboration of the Kurdistan Region Statistics Office (KRSO) within the Kurdistan’s Regional Government’s Ministry of Planning; IOM, the UN Migration Agency; and the United Nations Population Fund (UNPFA). Data was collected from October to November 2017.

 Support for the publication of the report is provided by the US Department of State, Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration (PRM), and by UNFPA.

Key Findings and Statistics

  • 87 percent of households have a monthly income of less than 1,000,000 Iraqi Dinar (approximately USD850).
  • More than 20 percent of youth (18-34 ages) out of workforce are reported to have lost hope in finding a job.
  • In 27 percent of households the head of household had not worked in the week preceding the survey. Over 40 percent of the KRI population aged between 15 and 64 years is an active part of the labour force with the public sector employing nearly half of the working population.
  • Overall data indicates that the average household size in KRI is 5.1 members.
  • 35 percent of the population is younger than 15 years, 61 percent belongs to the active labour force age group of 15-65 years and 4 percent is 65 or above.
  • KRI families currently enjoy an adequate standard of living: nearly all possess most common household appliances (television, stove or refrigerator). Three quarters of all families own the house they live in connected to the public water (90 per cent) and electricity networks and equipped with sanitation facilities.

Download the survey here.

For more information, please contact:
IOM Iraq: Sandra Black, Tel: +964 751 234 2550, Email: sblack@iom.int
Kurdistan Regional Statistics Office: Gohdar Mohammed, Tel: +964 750 448 8840, Email: gohdar.mohamed@krso.gov.krd
UNFPA: Salwa Moussa, Tel: +964 751 740 1545, Email: smoussa@unfpa.org

Language English Posted: Friday, September 14, 2018 - 11:42Image: Region-Country: IraqDefault: Multimedia: 

The Demographic Survey of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq, one of the largest statistical exercises conducted in the region since 1987, was launched on 13 September.

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

UN Migration Agency, Thai Labour Ministry Launch Interpreter Handbook to Enhance Protection for Migrant Workers

Fri, 09/14/2018 - 11:40

Bangkok – Migrant workers in Thailand often have difficulty understanding their legal rights due to language barriers. Without adequate information, they face multiple challenges in seeking protection under the law and access to legal remedies.

To fill this gap, the UN Migration Agency (IOM) has partnered with Thailand’s Ministry of Labour to develop a handbook targeting interpreters and Thai service providers.

The Interpreter Handbook for the Protection and Assistance of Migrant Workers, launched today (14/9), is the culmination of months of collaboration between the Ministry of Labour and IOM to build the capacity of interpreters and language coordinators working with migrants.

The first edition, available in Thai, covers protection-oriented principles, as well as details about the rights and duties of migrant workers, national labour protection laws and practical guidelines for interpretation.

Primarily developed for Ministry of Labour employees, the Handbook will be distributed to all Ministry-employed interpreters nationwide. But it will also be publicly available to other service providers, including NGO staff, public health professionals, social workers, lawyers and others who deal with migrants in the course of their work.

“While many positive initiatives have been undertaken to develop policies and administrative structures to better regulate labour migration flows, a lot of protection challenges remain, mainly due to language and cultural barriers. Interpreters play a vital role in helping migrant workers better understand their labour rights and the services available to them,” said IOM Thailand Chief of Mission Dana Graber Ladek.

“This handbook is the result of the participation of all actors – the government, NGOs, the private sector, civil society – in a coordinated effort towards the sustainable protection of migrant workers’ rights,” said Deputy Permanent Secretary of the Thai Ministry of Labour Petcharat Sin-auay.

Funded by the US Department of State’s Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration, the Handbook is an initiative under the Migrant Assistance and Protection Programme (MAPP) – a counter-trafficking project implemented in the Greater Mekong Sub-region.

For further information please contact IOM Thailand. Nathalie Hanley, Email: nhanley@iom.int, Tel: +66 2 343 9337 or Reuben Lim, Email: rlim@iom.int, Tel: +66 2 343 9370.

Language English Posted: Friday, September 14, 2018 - 11:38Image: Region-Country: ThailandThemes: Labour MigrationDefault: Multimedia: 

The Interpreter Handbook will protect the rights of migrant workers by helping them to overcome language barriers. Photo: IOM.

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

IOM Trains Sri Lankan Aircrew to Identify, Report Human Trafficking

Fri, 09/14/2018 - 11:33

Colombo - IOM, the UN Migration Agency, is today conducting a two-day training of trainers for SriLankan Airlines aircrew on identifying and reporting trafficking in persons on board flights.

The training, organized in Colombo at the request of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, is designed specifically for airline personnel and draws on the Guidelines for Training Cabin Crew on Identifying and Responding to Trafficking in Persons launched this year by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) and the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR.)

A group of 29 cabin crew training instructors, ground handling staff instructors and security staff instructors took part in the training. Participants will in turn will train all types of passenger handling staff, including cabin crews, at Sri Lanka’s national airline.

“It is timely and prudent that we are aware and play our part in the global fight against human trafficking - an issue that does not have limits or boundaries,” said Thusitha Ranasinghe, the airline’s Cabin Safety Training Manager.

Day 1 of the training,  led by IOM’s senior migration protection specialist in the Asia-Pacific region Jonathan Martens, addressed basic concepts and elements of human trafficking, with a focus on control mechanisms, visual cues and assessment indicators. Day 2 will teach participants how to report trafficking cases and help victims.

Aviation is a frequent mode of transport used by human traffickers and cabin crew and other airline personnel can encounter situations of human trafficking on board.

“Everybody has a role to play in combating trafficking and the role of the transport industry, especially aviation, is increasingly important with increased freedom of movement,” said OHCHR Senior Human Rights Advisor Juan Fernandez.

“This training is the first of its kind ever conducted in Sri Lanka. The aviation industry is in a unique position to identify and report trafficking cases, if cabin crew members and ground staff are properly equipped with the required skills,” said IOM Sri Lanka Chief of Mission Giuseppe Crocetti.

The training is part of a larger Australian-funded IOM project that for the past year has supported Sri Lanka’s National Anti-Human Trafficking Task Force in implementing a nationwide public information campaign on trafficking in persons, including awareness raising initiatives at local and grassroots levels.

For more information, please contact Giuseppe Crocetti at IOM Sri Lanka. Tel. +941 153 25354.

Email: gcrocetti@iom.int  

 

Language English Posted: Friday, September 14, 2018 - 11:30Image: Region-Country: Sri LankaThemes: Counter-TraffickingDefault: Multimedia: 

Aircrew can play a key role in combating human trafficking. Photo: IOM.

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Central American Governments Strengthen Capacities to Protect Migrant Workers

Fri, 09/14/2018 - 11:16

Guatemala City – About 40 officials from central and local governments of El Salvador, Honduras, Guatemala, and Mexico this week (12/09) convened in Guatemala to discuss how to enhance their capacities to protect migrant workers. The event was organized by the UN Migration Agency (IOM) and the International Labour Organization (ILO).

The participants, working in their governments in the sectors of migration, labour, foreign relations and national, received training on how the information on rights and fair contracting contribute to the protection of people who migrate in search of work, to improve their economic conditions and those of their families.

Throughout the workshop, the participants revealed that the groups that register the most applications for visas and work permits in the four countries are: border workers (who live in border areas and cross them daily for the labour purposes), returned migrants, and refugees or asylum seekers.

The most significant challenges identified by the participants as risks faced by migrant workers are labour exploitation, unequal treatment in employment, little access to social security benefits, precariousness, and discrimination, especially against migrant domestic workers.

"The increase in international labour migration and the number of temporary migrant workers entail new challenges in the configuration of regional proposals on hiring, as well as on protection of rights, equitable access to opportunities, improvement of registrations and promulgation of new norms framed in international agreements," said Ambassador Arabella Woolfolk, Director General of Consular and Migratory Affairs, of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Guatemala (MINEX) at the opening of the event.

“This region is one of the main migratory corridors in the world, it includes irregular routes and presence of smuggling and trafficking networks, with people taking advantage of the lack of information; these characteristics demand the search for solutions that respond to the needs and protection of labour migrants,” said Alexandra Bonnie, Regional Coordinator of IOM’s Mesoamerica Program.

“In 2018, a population of 258 million international migrants is estimated on the planet, representing 3.5 per cent of the world's population. Sixty-five per cent of these people are workers, so human mobility becomes a feature that is profoundly modifying the universe of work," said Ana Méndez Chicas, Guatemalan Coordinator of the REFRAME Project (Global Action to Improve the Framework of the Hiring of Migrant Workers) of the ILO.

IOM has made available to migrant populations, the MigrantApp, a mobile application that provides georeferenced information on immigration offices, health services, consular services, entry regulations, and work permits, among others. So far, it has been downloaded by about 10,000 users.

This Sub-Regional Workshop was organized by the Mesoamerica Program with the support of the Office of Population, Refuge, and Migration of the Department of State of the United States of America and the European Union through the REFRAME project of the ILO.

For more information, please contact Melissa Vega at IOM Guatemala. Tel: +502 2414-7401. Email: mevega@iom.int

Language English Posted: Friday, September 14, 2018 - 11:14Image: Region-Country: GuatemalaThemes: Capacity BuildingDefault: Multimedia: 

Migrant workers in Central America face labour exploitation, unequal treatment in employment, little access to social security benefits, precariousness and discrimination. Photo: IOM / Melissa Vega

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals Reach 74,501; Deaths Reach 1,586

Fri, 09/14/2018 - 11:13

Geneva – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, reports that 74,501 migrants and refugees entered Europe by sea in 2018 through 12 September, with 32,272 to Spain, the leading destination this year. This compares with 128,995 arrivals across the region through the same period last year, and 298,663 through a similar point (13 September) in 2016.

Spain, with over 43 per cent of all irregular arrivals on the Mediterranean through this year, has outpaced Greece and Italy throughout the summer. Italy’s arrivals to date – 20,343 – are the lowest recorded by IOM since 2014, lower in fact, than arrivals recorded by Italian authorities during many individual months over the past five years. The same can be said for Greece, whose totals for irregular migrant arrivals through the first week of September this year (20,961) recently surpassed arrivals to Italy. It is the first time that has happened since the early spring of 2016.

A year ago, Greece’s irregular migrant arrivals were about one-sixth those of Italy, while Spain’s were about one-tenth (see chart below).

IOM’s Missing Migrants Project has documented the deaths of 1,586 men, women and children on three Mediterranean crossing points. Most recently, at least 21 people died or went missing when attempting to reach Spain via the Western Mediterranean.

On 4 September, the remains of nine people from Sub-Saharan Africa washed up on a beach near Marsa Ben M’Hidi, in Algeria’s province of Tlemcen, near the Moroccan border. The distance to the Spanish coast from this area is only 200km.

The following day (5 September), four more bodies were recovered on the neighbouring beach of Saïdia, in Morocco, across the border from Marsa Ben M’Hidi.

On 10 September, the remains of six migrants – among them two women and one child – washed ashore at Driouch, near Nador, Morocco. Their remains were taken to the morgue of Nador’s Hassani Hospital and are awaiting identification.

On the opposite side of the Alboran Sea, the body of a woman was found at Las Salinas beach, in Roquetas de Mar, Almería on 11 September. The body of a young Sub-Saharan African man was retrieved by fishermen near La Almadraba, in the Spanish enclave of Ceuta, on 13 September. Those remains recovered over the last days are not connected to any known shipwreck.

Missing Migrants Project is investigating whether they are connected to reports of two boats that may have gone missing between August 30 and September 3 in the Alboran Sea, as reported by the NGO Alarmphone. Since the beginning of the year, 350 people have lost their lives in the Western Mediterranean.

Along the Central Mediterranean route IOM continues to investigate reports of dozens of lives lost on the route linking Libya to Italy on 1 September. IOM learned through tweeted reports of at least 100 lives lost at sea, but later learned of reports of a rescue in which two corpses were recovered, and 25 more migrants were reported missing. IOM has not confirmed the veracity of either report but hopes to have more complete information in the coming days.

IOM Italy released data Thursday on irregular arrivals from North Africa (see chart below) through nearly all of the first half of September. The 266 irregular migrants arriving through 12 September represent an average of just 22 per day – compared to averages of over 2,009 per day last September and 566 per day the September before that. According to IOM data collected during the current Mediterranean emergency, during peak summer months in 2016 and 2017, daily arrivals to Italy frequently surpassed 750.  Current arrival levels are around 3 per cent of those averages.

IOM Italy’s Flavio Di Giacomo also reported Thursday that Italian authorities have released data on irregular migrants’ nationalities through the first eight months of 2018. Leading sender nations through August were Tunisia and Eritrea, both with over 3,00 arrivals this year, followed by Sudan, Nigeria, Pakistan, Iraq and Côte d’Ivoire – all with over 1,000.

The remaining leaders – each with over 800 arrivals – are Mali, Algeria and Guinea. It is important to note that all the Sub Saharan senders (Eritrea, Sudan, Nigeria, Mali, Côte d’Ivoire, Guinea) show sharp drops in total arrivals – in some cases by as much as 90 per cent from this time last year. Only Tunisia shows an increase from levels of 2017 (see chart below).

IOM Spain’s Ana Dodevska reported Thursday that 32,272 irregular migrants have arrived by sea this year via the Western Mediterranean; of those, some 9,341 arrived in the 43 days since the start of August, a rate of 217 per day. For the first 12 days of September, irregular migration arrivals on the Western Mediterranean route were running at a rate of nearly 245 per day (see chart below).

On Thursday, IOM Athens’ Atigoni Avgeropoulou reported that over three days (10-12 September) Hellenic Coast Guard (HCG) units carried out one operation requiring search and rescue off the island of Lesvos. The HCG rescued a total 71 migrants and transferred them to that island.

Additional arrivals of some 100 during those days to Lesvos, Rhodes and Kos bring to 20,961 the total number of irregular arrivals to Greece by sea in 2018. Moreover, IOM Athens reports, another 12,726 land arrivals have been recorded on the Eastern Mediterranean through the end of August, and an unknown number since 1 September. (see charts below) The total number of land arrivals to Greece is 12,166.

Additional arrivals of some 100 during those days to Lesvos, Rhodes and Kos bring to 20,961 the total number of irregular arrivals to Greece by sea in 2018. Moreover, IOM Athens reports, another 12,166 land arrivals have been recorded on the Eastern Mediterranean through the end of August, and an unknown number since 1 September. (see charts below).

In the Western Balkans IOM’s Ivona Zakoska writes: Increased sea and land arrivals to Greece and the prolonged stay of migrants in various reception centres and other accommodation arrangements in transit countries have contributed toward an increase in secondary movement through the Western Balkans, specifically through Albania, Montenegro and Bosnia and Herzegovina.

According to available Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) flow monitoring data, more than 1,350 new migrants were registered arriving in the countries concerned in the first two weeks of September 2018, which is six times more than the average of 220 monthly arrivals reported in the three countries in 2017.

Between January and September, authorities in Albania, Montenegro and Bosnia and Herzegovina, registered a total of 18,038 irregular entries, a thirteen-fold increase compared to the 1,361 reported in the same period 2017, and eight times the 2,225 registered in the three mentioned countries in the whole of 2017.

According to the available information on nationalities, Pakistan, the Syrian Arab Republic, the Islamic Republic of Iran and Iraq are the most commonly reported origin countries. The distribution of migrants by nationality varies between the three countries on the route.

More than one third of all registered migrants in Bosnia and Herzegovina were from Pakistan, followed by those from the Syrian Arab Republic (18%) and Afghanistan (14%), the Islamic Republic of Iran (11%) and Iraq (9%).

In Montenegro and Albania, Syrian nationals comprised the majority (44% and 55% respectively), followed by those who arrived from Pakistan (18% and 10% respectively) and Iraq (7% and 8% respectively).

Such differences are explained by the fact that migrants in Bosnia and Herzegovina also enter from Serbia. Further on, since March 2018, DTM is monitoring outgoing flows from Albania to Montenegro in Shkoder region. According to available data there were 993 migrants apprehended while attempting to exit Albania irregularly.

Similarly, to the nationality breakdown of registered arrivals, outgoing flows are predominantly composed of migrants from the Syrian Arab Republic (41%) and Pakistan (32%).

Available DTM flow monitoring data for Serbia and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia also indicate increased movement of irregular migrants to/through these countries.

Between January and August 2018, there were 4,673 newly registered migrants in the reception centres across Serbia. This is almost twice the 2,897 registered in the same period last year, and slightly less than the 5,435 registered in the whole of 2017.

More than a quarter of all registered migrants in Serbia this year declared Afghan origin (28%), another 20 per cent were from Pakistan followed by 14 per cent of migrants from Bangladesh, 14 per cent from the Islamic Republic of Iran and 7 per cent of Iraqi nationals.

In the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia authorities reported the arrival of 2,361 irregular migrants, seven times more than the 319 registered between January and end of August 2018, and four times the 547 reported in the whole of 2017. More than half of the overall caseload were Iranian nationals (54%), followed by those from Afghanistan (11%), Pakistan (10%), Iraq (8%), Libya (6%) and the Syrian Arab Republic (4%).

IOM’s Missing Migrants Project has documented the deaths of 2,570 people during migration to international destinations in 2018 (see chart below). Globally, IOM estimates that more than 28,000 migrants have died since 2014.

Besides the Mediterranean, the MMP recorded that on the border between the United States and Mexico, US Border Patrol agents found the remains of a man who had died of dehydration in a ranch near Laredo, Texas on 3 September. That brings to 283 the number of border deaths through mid-September – a slight increase in deaths over the 261 recorded along the border at this time last year.

In Europe, an unidentified migrant died on 9 September when he was hit by a vehicle in the E40 highway, near Middelkerke, Belgium. The main continent of Europe has recorded the deaths of 68 migrants this year, mostly along highways and railroad crossings. Last year at this time MMP recorded just 43 migrant deaths inside Europe.

Missing Migrants Project data are compiled by IOM staff but come from a variety of sources, some of which are unofficial. To learn more about how data on migrants deaths and disappearances are collected, click here.

For latest arrivals and fatalities in the Mediterranean, please visit: http://migration.iom.int/europe

Learn more about the Missing Migrants Project at: http://missingmigrants.iom.int

 

For more information, please contact:

Joel Millman at IOM HQ, Tel: +41 79 103 8720, Email: jmillman@iom.int

Flavio Di Giacomo, IOM Coordination Office for the Mediterranean, Italy, Tel: +39 347 089 8996, Email: fdigiacomo@iom.int

Ana Dodevska, IOM Spain, Tel: +34 91 445 7116, Email: adodevska@iom.int

Hicham Hasnaoui, IOM Morocco, Tel: + 212 5 37 65 28 81, Email: hhasnaoui@iom.int

Atigoni Avgeropoulou, IOM Greece, Tel: +30 210 99 19 040 (Ext. 166); Mobile: +30 69 48 92 98 09

Email: aavgeropoulou@iom.int

Christine Nikolaidou, IOM Greece, Tel: +30 210 99 19 040 ext. 248, Email: cnikolaidou@iom.int

Kelly Namia, IOM Greece, Tel: +30 210 991 2174, Email: knamia@iom.int

Ivona Zakoska, IOM Regional DTM, Austria, Tel: + +43 1 5812222, Email: izakoska@iom.int

Julia Black, IOM GMDAC, Germany, Tel: +49 30 278 778 27, Email: jblack@iom.int

Christine Petré, IOM Libya. Tel. +216 29 240 448 Email: chpetre@iom.int

Myriam Chabbi, IOM Tunisia, Tel: +216 28 78 78 05 (mobile) office: +216 71 860 312 (Ext. 109), Email: mchabbi@iom.int

Dimitrios Tsagalas, IOM Cyprus, Tel: + 22 77 22 70, E-mail: dtsagalas@iom.int

Language English Posted: Friday, September 14, 2018 - 10:56Image: Region-Country: SwitzerlandThemes: Missing MigrantsDefault: Multimedia:  Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Over One Fifth of Irregular Migrants to Europe Coming by Land: New IOM Report

Fri, 09/14/2018 - 10:56

Vienna — While the perilous and deadly Mediterranean sea migration route is well known, new figures from IOM show that more than one in five people arriving irregularly in Europe do so by land.  

The most frequently-used route is from Turkey to Greece where authorities reported a total of 12,166 land arrivals since the beginning of 2018.

“Whether migrants attempt to flee by land or sea we must always be aware of the dangers they are in, and the cynical business model of the smugglers who exploit them,” said Lado Gvilava, Chief of IOM’s Turkey Mission. “We know that as soon as one route is blocked another one will open. As long as people see their home places as unsafe we need to work with governments to provide them with the protection they need, whether they are in camps, on the move, or arriving in new countries.”

The 17,966 land arrivals to Europe between January and end early September 2018 represent an almost six times increase compared to the 2,464 reported in the same period last year, according to IOM data.

 As in previous years, the Syrian Arab Republic, Iraq and Afghanistan are the most common origin countries reported by more than 50 per cent of all registered migrants and refugees in Greece.

The increased migratory movements through Western Balkans (Albania, Montenegro, Bosnia and Herzegovina) continued during this reporting period reaching a total of 18,038 between January and September 2018, and almost seven-fold increase on the 2,675 registered in the whole of 2017.  

The majority of migrants (12,816) are registered in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Pakistan is the most commonly reported country declared by a third of overall registered caseload, followed by those who arrived from the Syrian Arab Republic (16 per cent), Afghanistan (14 per cent), the Islamic Republic of Iran (11 per cent), Iraq (9 per cent) and 29 other nationalities. In Montenegro and Albania, Syrian nationals comprised the majority (44 per cent and 55 per cent respectively), followed by those who arrived from Pakistan (18 per cent and 10 per cent respectively) and Iraq (7 per cent and 8 per cent respectively).

For more information on arrivals to Europe please visit http://rovienna.iom.int/publications and read the latest report that compiles available information on Mixed Migration Flows to Europe for the month of July 2018. More on the profile of the migrants on the move to Europe can be found in the analysis of the individual surveys conducted earlier this summer with migrants in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

For more information please contact:

Joe Lowry at IOM’s Vienna Regional Office, Tel: +43660 3776404, Email: jlowry@iom.int

Ryan Schroeder at IOM’s Brussels Regional Office, Tel: +3248 5597348, Email rschroeder@iom.int

Language English Posted: Friday, September 14, 2018 - 10:25Image: Region-Country: AustriaDefault: Multimedia: 

Cover of IOM’s report on displacement in Europe, showing migrants moving towards the Croatian border from Velika Kladusa, Bosnia.  Photo: IOM

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

IOM Resumes Voluntary Humanitarian Return Flights from Libya Following Tripoli Ceasefire

Wed, 09/12/2018 - 06:17

Tripoli – A flight to Ghana is the first return flight to leave Libya in the wake of this week’s ceasefire agreement ending hostilities in southern Tripoli and surrounding areas. The reopening of Tripoli’s Mitiga Airport permitted a commercial flight to leave the airport for Ghana, carrying 21 migrants, said IOM, the UN Migration Agency (10/09).

The migrants – from different districts of Tripoli – expressed interest in returning safely to their home country through IOM’s Voluntary Humanitarian Return (VHR) programme. The programme provides a safe pathway home to migrants who wish to return home but have little means of accomplishing that. Upon arrival, the returning migrants will be provided with sustainable reintegration assistance to further aid them when returning to their community of origin.

“We are relieved that this flight was able to leave Libya safely and we hope to charter more flights in the coming days and weeks to meet the increasing demand,” said Ashraf Hassan, VHR Programme Coordinator at IOM Libya’s mission. “We have observed a large number of people applying to return home through VHR. We are taking advantage of the current ceasefire and relative calm to assist them to exit to safety.”

Other chartered flights are also scheduled to leave Libya later this week with migrants on board assisted from different urban areas. The charters had already been scheduled for departure, however, following the eruption of violence and fighting between the warring parties two weeks ago and the cessation of operations at Mitiga airport, the flights had been postponed. 

“The recent clashes in and around Tripoli have endangered the lives of locked-up migrants, further aggravating their suffering and increasing their vulnerability,” explained Othman Belbeisi, IOM Libya’s Chief of Mission.

“We continue to respond to existing and emerging humanitarian needs including increasing requests for voluntary humanitarian return, as our teams on the ground are directly registering these requests in detention centers and urban areas to expedite the safe return of people.”

IOM launched its VHR hotline through social media platforms, to scale up efforts in reaching out to a larger number of stranded migrants across Libya whose lives may now be at a far greater risk due to the current security conditions. 

For further inquiries, please contact at IOM Libya, Maya Abu Ata: mabuata@iom.int or Safa Msehli: smsehli@iom.int

Language English Posted: Wednesday, September 12, 2018 - 12:15Image: Region-Country: LibyaDefault: Multimedia: 

The Ghanaian migrants boarding their return flight at Tripoli’s Mitiga Airport on 10 September 2018. Photo: IOM / Hmouzi

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Turkish Airlines and IOM Sign Long Term Partnership to Assist Migrants Globally

Tue, 09/11/2018 - 08:49

Geneva The promotion of safe, orderly and regular migration is at the heart of the long-term partnership agreement signed yesterday (10/09) between the UN Migration Agency (IOM) and Turkish Airlines, one of the largest carriers in the world.

Signed by IOM Director General William Lacy Swing and Turkish Airlines Chairman of the Board and the Executive Committee, M. İlker Aycı, the cooperation will focus initially on the Organization’s Migration Application (MigApp), which leverages the widespread use of telecommunications technology to provide practical information about services available to migrants globally.

“The agreement opens a whole range of possibilities for cooperation both in terms of Turkish Airlines’ commitment to social responsibility and our own commitments to migrants and refugees,” said DG Swing.

“It is in many ways an ideal partnership as it will allow us to do a lot more in terms of informing migrants, in terms of promoting migrant rights, in terms of training to sensitize airline officials to smuggling and trafficking in persons which is one of the heinous crimes of our times,” he added.

“As the national flag carrier of Turkey, a leading country today that tries to extend its hand to the vulnerable communities in the world, we are glad to strengthen our collaboration with IOM. Through this agreement we see a way to promote the idea of living together in peace and traveling freely and legally as envisioned under the Sustainable Development Goals of the United Nations.” Chairman Aycı said of the accord.

IOM hopes that the agreement will lead to further collaborations on awareness raising campaigns on safe travel in countries of origin to help counter the trafficking of migrants as well as on cooperation on border support and documentation – including the possible training of Turkish Airlines employees and partners.

In addition, IOM will share its work on migrant health, including travel health assistance/pre-departure health screening services with Turkish Airlines with a view to future cooperation. Finally, it is expected that Turkish Airlines will provide in kind support for IOM’s Global Film Festival on Migration which this year attracted 870 film submissions and will take place in over 100 countries in November-December 2018.

The agreement with a major private sector company comes against the backdrop of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goal (SDGs) which recognizes the need for safer, orderly and regular migration (Goal 10.7), and as part of the forthcoming Global Compact on Migration, acknowledges that a cooperative approach is needed to optimize the overall benefits of migration, while addressing the risks and challenges facing individuals and communities in countries of origin, transit and destination. 

IOM’s MigApp, which was launched in December 2017 as part of IOM’s transition to digital mobility, seeks to offset the enormous volume of misinformation on migration circulating today by providing migrants with information in English about visas, health and travel regulations, alerts on global incidents arising from conflict or natural disasters, and the contact numbers of counter-trafficking hotlines around the world. A May 2018 update expanded coverage to French, Spanish and Arabic.

MigApp was updated at that time with new migration-related information and services. For example, self-paying migrants travelling to the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada and United States from South Africa, Nepal, Pakistan and Egypt, can now book their medical appointments through MigApp.

MigApp was developed thanks to financial support from the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC).

Download MigApp for Android or iOS.

For more information please contact Paul Dillon, IOM HQ, Tel:  +41 22 717 94 31, Mobile: +41 79 636 98 74, Email: pdillon@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, September 11, 2018 - 14:40Image: Region-Country: SwitzerlandThemes: IOMOthersDefault: Multimedia: 

IOM DG William Lacy Swing (r) with Turkish Airlines Chairman of the Board, M. İlker Aycı. Photo: IOM/Amanda Nero

IOM DG William Lacy Swing (l) with Turkish Airlines Chairman of the Board, M. İlker Aycı. Photo: IOM/Amanda Nero

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals Reach 73,696; Deaths Reach 1,565

Tue, 09/11/2018 - 08:46

Geneva IOM, the UN Migration Agency, reports that 73,696 migrants and refugees entered Europe by sea in 2018 through 9 September, with 32,022 to Spain, the leading destination this year. This compares with 128,993 arrivals across the region through the same period last year, and 298,663 through a similar point (13 September) in 2016.

Spain, with over 43 per cent of all irregular arrivals on the Mediterranean through this year, has outpaced Greece and Italy throughout the summer. Italy’s arrivals to date – 20,319 – are the lowest recorded by IOM since 2014, lower in fact, than arrivals recorded by Italian authorities during many individual months over the past five years.

The same can be said for Greece, whose totals for irregular migrant arrivals through the first week of September this year (20,430) recently surpassed arrivals to Italy. It is the first time that has happened since the early spring of 2016.
A year ago, Greece’s irregular migrant arrivals were about one-sixth those of Italy, while Spain’s were about one-tenth (see chart below).

IOM Italy’s Flavio Di Giacomo reported late Monday that some media outlets have learned of a shipwreck off Libya with at least 100 migrants believed to have drowned. Details were few after initial reports, with some dispatches—thus far unconfirmed—suggesting as many as 115 people may be missing at sea with another 15 bodies recovered, including those of Libyan nationals who may have been among the smugglers, not passengers. These reports indicate as well that survivors had been returned to Libya.
IOM Libya’s Maya Abu Ata, later Monday, offered these details: a single drowning incident occurred on Saturday (1September) after which a Libyan Coast Guard unit returned a boat to Libya and transferred all migrants on board to a detention center. This operation references two rubber boats intercepted with a total of 278 people on board. Among the survivors were 48 women and 48 children. Authorities report the remains of two people were retrieved and that, additionally, around 25 migrants are missing, according to what survivors told the Libyan Coast Guard.

So far this year, around 13,000 migrants have been returned to Libyan shores after being rescued or intercepted at sea.
IOM Libya also reported it has resumed Voluntary Humanitarian Return flights out of Tripoli after a ceasefire was declared there.
IOM Spain’s Ana Dodevska reported Monday that 32,022 irregular migrants have arrived by sea this year via the Western Mediterranean, of those nearly 9,100 arriving in the 40 days since the start of August, a rate of 227 per day. For the first nine days of September, irregular migration arrivals on the Western Mediterranean route were running at a rate of nearly 300 per day (see chart below).

Dodevska also shared recent data on the nationalities of those arriving this year by sea. Nearly 60 per cent she reported are from Sub Saharan Africa, including large contingents from Mali, Guinea Conakry, Côte d’Ivoire and The Gambia.

About a third of all sea arrivals – have been classified as ‘Sub Saharan African’ because definitive proof of citizenship had not been obtained. Of those who can be classified by nationality, the largest group of Sub Saharan Africans appear to have arrived from Guinea Conakry, followed by Mali, The Gambia and Côte d’Ivoire. Another large contingent is arriving from Morocco.

Dodevska explained that arriving migrants in Spain first are attended to by Red Cross staff (who offer first aid assistance, blankets and dry clothes). Afterwards, the Spanish Ministry of Interior takes over for an identification process (photos, fingerprints are taken of everyone) which she said can take up to 72 hours, although often is completed much sooner.

“Afterwards,” she said, “individuals are transferred to the Humanitarian Reception Centres. These centres are under the competence of the Ministry of Labour, Migration and Social Security and are managed by NGOs.”

Dodevska explained those arriving by land route to Ceuta and Melilla are transferred to the Centres for Temporary Stay of Immigrants (CETI) and placed in the autonomous cities of Ceuta and Melilla. These two centres are also under the competence of the Spanish Ministry of Labour, Migration and Social Security.

On Monday, IOM Athens’ Christine Nikolaidou reported that over five days (04-09 September) Hellenic Coast Guard units (HCG) managed at least five incidents requiring search and rescue operations off the islands of Lesvos, Kos and Symi. The HCG rescued a total of 113 migrants and transferred them to those islands.

Additional arrivals of 753 migrants during those days to Samos and Kos – as well as to Lesvos, Chios and Rhodes – bring to 20,430 the total number of irregular arrivals to Greece by sea in 2018. In addition, some 11,050 land arrivals have been recorded on the Eastern Mediterranean through the end of July, and an unknown number since 1 August.

Greek arrivals through the first nine days of September – some 1,505 men, women and children – are already past the half-way point for each of the previous months of March through August, and more than each of all the arrivals for the full months of January and February. This may be an indicator of a shift of some migration routes away from Libya towards Italy with more irregular migrants seeking passage through Turkey and other states in the region (see charts below).

For latest arrivals and fatalities in the Mediterranean, please visit: http://migration.iom.int/europe
Learn more about the Missing Migrants Project at: http://missingmigrants.iom.int

For more information, please contact:
Joel Millman at IOM HQ, Tel: +41 79 103 8720, Email: jmillman@iom.int
Mircea Mocanu, IOM Romania, Tel:  +40212115657, Email: mmocanu@iom.int
Dimitrios Tsagalas, IOM Cyprus, Tel: + 22 77 22 70, E-mail: dtsagalas@iom.int
Flavio Di Giacomo, IOM Coordination Office for the Mediterranean, Italy, Tel: +39 347 089 8996, Email: fdigiacomo@iom.int
Hicham Hasnaoui, IOM Morocco, Tel: + 212 5 37 65 28 81, Email: hhasnaoui@iom.int
Christine Nikolaidou, IOM Greece, Tel: +30 210 99 19 040 ext. 248, Email: cnikolaidou@iom.int

Julia Black, IOM GMDAC, Germany, Tel: +49 30 278 778 27, Email: jblack@iom.int
Christine Petré, IOM Libya, Tel: +216 29 240 448, Email: chpetre@iom.int
Ana Dodevska, IOM Spain, Tel: +34 91 445 7116, Email: adodevska@iom.int
Myriam Chabbi, IOM Tunisia, Mobile: +216 28 78 78 05, Tel: +216 71 860 312 (Ext. 109), Email: mchabbi@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, September 11, 2018 - 14:40Image: Region-Country: SwitzerlandThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesMissing MigrantsDefault: Multimedia:  Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

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