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Updated: 2 hours 24 min ago

IOM Staff Tackle Floods and Landslides to Support Rohingya Refugees During Monsoon

Fri, 07/27/2018 - 10:48

Cox's Bazar – UN Migration Agency (IOM) staff have been working round the clock this week, as monsoon downpours caused flooding and landslides in Rohingya refugee camps in Bangladesh, where almost one million people are living in bamboo and tarpaulin shelters after fleeing violence in Myanmar.

IOM health teams waded through waist-high water in some areas in a bid to reach their patients and were able to keep all but one medical facility operating despite extremely difficult ground conditions.
To ensure medical needs were met in the area where the clinic was not accessible to staff, an IOM mobile medical team worked out of a local school. In total over 1,500 medical consultations were carried out by IOM health workers on 25 July – one of the heaviest days of rain.

To ensure access to vital aid and services could continue, three teams from the Site Maintenance Engineering Project (SMEP) a joint project between IOM, WFP and UNHCR worked through the night of 25/26 July to prevent road collapses on a key route through the megacamp.

IOM site management staff assessed over 1,800 people affected by weather-related incidents, and supported distribution of emergency supplies including shelter, food and bedding materials.

“With heavy rains expected to continue over the coming weeks, IOM and partners will continue to do everything we can to keep people safe and support them during these very challenging conditions, but we desperately need more funding to enable us to keep up this life-saving work,” said Manuel Marques Pereira, IOM’s emergency coordinator in Cox’s Bazar.

At present, just one quarter of the funding for the joint response to the Rohingya crisis has been secured and the continuation of critical services is now under threat.

IOM shelter staff this week also provided full shelter upgrade kits or materials such as tarpaulins and ropes to families whose shelters were destroyed and damaged by the rains.

A small number of families were relocated from one of the worst affected flood areas to a newly prepared area of the camp.

IOM protection staff supported the assessment of those whose shelters were affected by the weather and helped identify extremely vulnerable individuals to ensure they received additional support, including for those who needed emergency relocation.

IOM, through the Inter Sectoral Coordination Group, has offered to support the Government of Bangladesh in its work with the host community in Cox’s Bazar. Assessments are being carried out and IOM stands ready to support all those affected.

For more information please contact Fiona MacGregor at IOM Cox's Bazar, Tel. +8801733335221, Email: fmacgregor@iom.int

Language English Posted: Friday, July 27, 2018 - 16:55Image: Region-Country: BangladeshThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesRohingya CrisisDefault: Multimedia: 

Rohingya refugees affected by heavy monsoon rains receive IOM shelter materials to help repair and secure their shelters. Photo: IOM 

Staff from the joint Site Maintenance Engineering Project worked through the night to prevent road collapses and keep vital access open in the Rohingya refugee camps. Photo: IOM/SMEP 

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

More Support Vital for 970,000 Displaced People in Ethiopia's Gedeo, West Guji

Fri, 07/27/2018 - 10:48

Dilla – Roughly 970,000 people have been internally displaced by conflict in Ethiopia’s Gedeo Zone and West Guji in the past four months, the majority in June. With so many people becoming displaced in such a short time period, IOM, the UN Migration Agency, and humanitarian partners have been scaling up their presence to provide urgent, live-saving assistance.

IOM is providing shelter assistance and essential aid items, facilitating access to water and sanitation services and raising awareness about hygiene to the displaced populations in both areas, many of whom have found shelter in unfinished buildings or in unhealthy conditions with just a sheet of tarpaulin for protection from the elements.

Access to safe sanitation and clean water is of concern, as is ensuring health needs are met. In the past three weeks, IOM has constructed 318 latrine stances, seven temporary communal shelters and eight communal kitchens. To improve the overall delivery of humanitarian assistance, IOM is providing displacement tracking and site management support.

Access IOM's latest reports on displacement in Gedeo and West Guji here

Two airlifts this week have delivered 200 tonnes of aid donated by UKAID to Ethiopia bound for the internally displaced populations in Gedeo and West Guji. Most people fled their homes with little more than the clothes they were wearing. The UKAID airlifts contain badly needed shelter materials and blankets as Ethiopia is in the midst of its cold rainy season. IOM and partners began distributing aid yesterday and expect it will take approximately 15 days to reach an estimated 50,000 displaced people.

Earlier this week, IOM released a much-needed appeal for USD 22.2 million to continue its humanitarian operations in Gedeo and West Guji.

“We are extremely grateful to the donors, who have shown great support for the people and Government of Ethiopia, but more funding is urgently required to meet the needs of the hundreds of thousands displaced people in Gedeo and West Guji,” said Maureen Achieng, IOM Ethiopia Chief of Mission and Representative to the African Union, IGAD and UNECA. “Without additional funding, lives will be at risk. The needs are immense – the international community’s response must match them.”

For more information, please contact Olivia Headon, Tel: +251902484062, Email: oheadon@iom.int

Language English Posted: Friday, July 27, 2018 - 17:00Image: Region-Country: EthiopiaThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesInternally Displaced PersonsDefault: Multimedia: 

A girl looks into her shelter in an overcrowded displacement site in West Guji, Ethiopia. Photo: IOM/Olivia Headon

A woman's name is checked against the registration list before she receives aid from UKAID in Gedeo, Ethiopia. Photo: IOM/Olivia Headon 

Men, women and children queue for aid from UKAID in one of the largest displacement sites in Gedeo, Ethiopia. Photo: IOM/Olivia Headon 

A displaced man carries material to build or reinforce his shelter in Gedeo, Ethiopia. Photo: IOM/Olivia Headon 

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

IOM Allocates USD 75,000 to Aid Victims of Lao Dam Disaster

Fri, 07/27/2018 - 10:48

Vientiane – As rescue operations continue in villages flooded by the collapse on Monday (23/7) of the vast Saddle Dam D, part of the Xepien – Xenamnoy hydropower project in south-eastern Lao People's Democratic Republic's Attapeu province, IOM has allocated USD 75,000 to kickstart its emergency relief operations in the area. 

According to the Lao authorities, the disaster was triggered by heavy rains across the region brought by Tropical Storm Son-Tinh. The storm affected an estimated 16,256 people in 11 provinces across the country.

The damage caused by the dam breach was particularly severe in 13 villages in Sanamxay district, which affected an estimated 6,351 people. Some 3,060 people are now displaced and staying in temporary emergency shelters. Twenty-six deaths have been recorded and 131 people are still missing.

The water from the flash flooding is now reportedly receding, but weather forecasters warn of more heavy rain today through Monday. Washed out roads and the destruction of 14 bridges in the area are also making road access to the remote area very difficult, while shallow water in flooded areas is also hampering access by boat.

IOM, which between 2016-2018 managed a malaria control project in the area, which borders Viet Nam and Cambodia, is working with UN partners and the Lao authorities to identify most urgent needs. According to an initial government assessment, these include food, drinking water, personal hygiene kits, mobile toilets, clothing, tents and housing repair kits. Boats to access the worst hit areas are also needed.

IOM has deployed technical experts from its regional Asia-Pacific office in Bangkok to the Lao People's Democratic Republic specializing in displacement management, migration health, camp coordination and camp management, emergency assessment, displacement tracking and logistics support.

The initial USD 75,000 of IOM funding will go towards areas of greatest need identified by the government and UN partners. They will likely include provision of shelter materials, tarpaulins and plastic sheets; non-food items including clothing, blankets, buckets, jerry cans, kitchen sets, sleeping mats, mosquito nets and tools; and medicines.

The emergency response is organized by sector or “Cluster”. IOM is co-leading the Shelter Cluster with UN Habitat and the Ministry of Public Works and Housing. It is also part of the Health and Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) Clusters, which are led by WHO and UNICEF respectively.

Malaria is endemic in the affected area, but IOM Regional Health Specialist Dr. Patrick Duigan says that displaced families may be at greater risk of waterborne diseases in the aftermath of disaster. “Floods often wash away mosquitos and larvae, which reduces the risk of malaria for the first eight weeks or so. Then, as the area dries out, the risk of malaria will return,” he said.    

“IOM is now putting our global expertise in emergency response at the disposal of the government of the Lao People's Democratic Republic – our newest member state – to help it to cope with the aftermath of this major disaster. But we are also committed to helping these people in the longer term to restart their lives and are reaching out to international donors,” said IOM Lao PDR Head of Office Misato Yuasa.     

IOM, the UN Migration Agency, began operations in the Lao People's Democratic Republic in 2002, and in June 2018 the country joined IOM as its 171st member state.

For more on IOM programmes in the Lao People's Democratic Republic, please click here.

For more information please contact Chris Lom at the IOM Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific in Bangkok. Tel. +66.62.602.8752, Email: clom@iom.int. Or Misato Yuasa at the IOM Vientiane in the Lao People's Democratic Republic. Tel: +856.21.267.730, Email: myuasa@iom.int.

Language English Posted: Friday, July 27, 2018 - 17:05Image: Region-Country: ThailandThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesInternally Displaced PersonsDefault: Multimedia: 

Sanamxay villagers sought safety on the roofs of their houses to escape the flooding following the July 23 dam collapse. Photo: CNN. 

Some 3,060 displaced people are now staying in temporary shelters having fled their flooded homes in Sanamxay district. Photo: CNN. 

Large areas of Sanamxay district remain submerged following the July 23 dam collapse. Photo: CNN.

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

IOM, African Union Launch Study on Benefits, Challenges of Free Movement of Persons in Africa

Fri, 07/27/2018 - 10:40

Addis Ababa – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, and the African Union Commission (AUC) have launched a study on the Benefits and Challenges of Free Movement of Persons in Africa.

The study – commissioned by the AUC and IOM to further inform deliberations on and work towards continental integration – explores the argument for free movement, while also highlighting potential pitfalls, and enables for a well-governed continental free movement regime.

One key conclusion is that the benefits of free movement far outweigh any challenges that may rise; moreover, solutions to those challenges do not lie in slowing the march towards freer movement of African citizens on the continent, but in AU Member States individually and collectively working to address the key challenges, the study has noted.

Ambassador Hope Tumukunde Gasatura, in her capacity as chair of the Specialized Technical Committee of the African Union on Migration, Refugees and IDPs and Ambassador of Rwanda to Ethiopia and Djibouti, underlined that Rwanda’s experience following its decision to ensure visas are obtainable upon arrival for all African nationals has occasioned many benefits, including an increase in tourism and a more favourable trade balance for Rwanda. None of the often-touted security concerns linked to migration have played out in the case of Rwanda.

The Commissioner for Political Affairs for the African Union Commission, Ambassador Minata Samate Cessouma, noted that free movement of persons will be critical to achieving the socio-economic and political integration and prosperity envisioned in Agenda 2063 – The Africa We Want. She noted the progress made thus far in facilitating free movement of persons – so far, 32 African countries have signed the Protocol to the Treaty Establishing the African Economic Community Relating to Free Movement of Persons, Right of Residence and Right of Establishment, and some several countries are reflecting on how to commence implementation of visa upon arrival policies. However, she underlined the urgency in moving towards ratification and implementation of the protocol, noting that the fifteen ratifications are required for the protocol to come into force. Thus far, only Rwanda has ratified the protocol.

In her overview of the study, Maureen Achieng, IOM Ethiopia Chief of Mission and Representative to the AU, IGAD and UNECA, discussed the benefits of free movement as advanced in the study. She explained that free movement of persons will be key to reaching the target of 50 per cent intra-African trade by 2045 as envisioned in Agenda 2063. She went on to underline the key recommendations advanced in the study as proposed responses to the challenges to implementing a free movement regime, and potential threats it could bring in. The study notes that these include the need to improve national civil registration systems and enhanced capacities of border management and law enforcement capabilities of Member States.

Dr. Khabele Matlosa, Director of the AUC/Department of Political Affairs applauded the study, adding that “It is critical for us to unveil the findings of the study as they will help Member States to approach the issue of free movement from an informed stand point.” He appreciated the fact that the study takes account of current efforts of the African Union and its respective Regional Economic Communities to facilitate free movement of persons in Africa.

The study, and indeed the support that IOM has continued to provide to AU deliberations and work towards continental free movement, has been made possible through financial support from the Government of Norway. In his message of support, Andreas Gaarder, Norway’s Ambassador to Ethiopia, Djibouti, the African Union and IGAD declared that “Inter-Africa trade cannot happen when businesses, ideas, and people cannot move around the continent. Migration and labour mobility present an opportunity for growth and economic development.” Ambassador Gaarder concluded by reassuring the AUC and its partners of Norway’s continued support with a view to facilitating safe, orderly and regular migration.

For more information, please contact Mazango Eric, Email: emazango@iom.int or Alemayehu Seifeselassie at IOM Ethiopia, Tel: +251 11 6611117 (Ext. 455), Mobile: +251 91 163 9082, Email: salemayehu@iom.int.

Language English Posted: Friday, July 27, 2018 - 16:32Image: Region-Country: EthiopiaThemes: Migration ResearchDefault: Multimedia: 

IOM and the African Union Commission launch report on the Benefits and Challenges of Free Movement of Persons in Africa. Photo: AUC 

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

IOM Launches USD 22.2M Appeal for Gedeo, West Guji Displacement Crisis in Ethiopia

Tue, 07/24/2018 - 10:10

Dilla – Today (24/07), IOM the UN Migration Agency launched an appeal for USD 22,200,000 to respond to the internal displacement crisis in Ethiopia’s Gedeo (SNNPR region) and West Guji (Oromia region) zones. Since April 2018, some 970,000 people have fled their homes due to fighting between communities along the border of the two regions; the vast majority were displaced in June alone.

“Leaving with what little they could carry and typically losing these possessions on their journey to safety, the displaced communities in Gedeo and West Guji are in great need of humanitarian support to help them get through Ethiopia’s cold and rainy season,” said William Lacy Swing, IOM Director General.

“The international community must rally for the people and Government of Ethiopia. Some partners have already begun to do so, and we thank them, but the current funding levels for a sudden onset crisis of this scale – nearly one million people displaced such a short period of time – are nowhere near acceptable,” added Director General Swing.

Since June, IOM has been scaling up its response in Gedeo and West Guji. However, urgent funding is required to continue to provide life-saving assistance. The IOM appeal outlines funding requirements for the next six months in line with the Government’s West Guji-Gedeo response plan.

Many of the displaced population are staying with local communities, while others are sheltering at collective sites like schools, Government properties and disused or unfinished buildings. Those staying in the local community still come to the collective sites during the day to access humanitarian assistance. The collective sites are overcrowded with thousands of people sheltering in buildings not fit for habitation and thousands more are sleeping outside on the muddy ground with only a sheet of tarpaulin to protect them from the cold and wet weather. Both situations raise major concerns from protection and health perspectives.

IOM operations focus on providing humanitarian assistance to displaced populations in collective sites and within host communities through an integrated approach, including core relief distributions, primary health care, shelter and water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH). Through site management support, IOM is facilitating the improvement of humanitarian service delivery, as well as the local authorities’ capacity to address protection concerns in displacement sites. In addition, IOM is supporting the overall humanitarian community's response by monitoring population movements and needs through its Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM).  

In the past two weeks, IOM has distributed over 2,000 blankets and is currently transporting more items to the collective sites like blankets and emergency shelter kits, which include tarpaulin and rope, through a UK Department for International Development (DFID) in-kind donation. For those who are sheltering outside buildings, IOM has begun the construction of 40 communal shelters, of which four have been completed. IOM is also building communal kitchens for the displaced communities at collective sites: five of these have so far been completed.

With so many people sheltering in sites not prepared to host them, access to safe sanitation is another major worry. In just over two weeks, IOM has constructed more than 200 latrines of a planned total of 450. IOM is also promoting safe hygiene practices among the displaced population through the formation of committees, household visits, group sessions and information campaigns.

Health needs are also high but the capacity of local hospitals and clinics to address these needs is outweighed by the sheer number of people displaced in such a small area and short span of time. IOM plans to support local health infrastructure through staff and mobile health clinics.

Access the detailed appeal here.

For more information, please contact Olivia Headon in Ethiopia, Tel: +251902484062, Email: oheadon@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, July 24, 2018 - 16:02Image: Region-Country: EthiopiaDefault: Multimedia: 

IOM constructs safe sanitation facilities for displaced communities in Gedeo zone. Photo: Olivia Headon/IOM 2018 

A mother holds her baby in the schoolroom that has become a temporary home for her and other mothers. Photo: Olivia Headon/IOM 2018 

An IOM team meets with representatives of the displaced community. Photo: Olivia Headon/IOM 2018 

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Over 1,000 New Shelters Built for Rohingya Refugees Threatened by Landslides

Tue, 07/24/2018 - 10:09

Cox’s Bazar – Shelter teams from IOM, the UN Migration Agency, working with over 19,000 Rohingya refugee and local labourers, this week completed the construction of over 1,000 new shelters as part of a rapid response project to help move refugee families most at risk from landslides during the monsoon.

In just over a month, 1,150 of the “Robust Emergency Shelters” have been built with the support of refugee and host communities, who have helped with the construction and transported materials to the new site known as Camp 20 Extension.

Almost a million Rohingya refugees who fled violence in Myanmar are currently living in tarpaulin and bamboo shelters on hilly land in the Cox’s Bazar region of southern Bangladesh – an area prone to some of the world’s worst monsoon conditions.

IOM and partner organisations are working to move thousands of families whose shelters are most at risk from soil erosion and landslides during the monsoon. Hillsides stripped of vegetation during the initial influx of refugees in late August 2017 have become increasingly unstable.

The new shelters, which have been directly constructed by the IOM shelter programme, use techniques designed to make them more durable during the heavy rains. They are built on land prepared and made safe under the Site Maintenance Engineering Project – a joint initiative between IOM, WFP and UNHCR.

“This is an important achievement and a testament to the incredibly hard work of IOM’s shelter teams, the joint efforts of the SMEP initiative, and of course the refugees and host community themselves,” said Manuel Pereira, IOM’s Emergency Coordinator in Cox’s Bazar.

“Everyone involved has put an immense effort into making this land safer and creating robust shelters where families facing the very real danger of landslides can now live more securely. But we desperately need more funding for this work to continue,” he said.

Ambi Khatu, a 60-year-old woman originally from Buthidaung in Myanmar’s North Rakhine State, is among those who have moved into the new shelters.

“My (previous) shelter was damaged in a landslide. The mud overflowed into my house. I feel here is a good place. I feel better,” she said, showing off the small plot of pumpkin seedlings she recently planted outside her new shelter.

IOM has played a lead role in meeting the shelter needs of those affected by the Rohingya refugee crisis. Since February this year, almost 43,200 households have received shelter upgrade kits, while 41,500 households have been given shelter upgrades and disaster risk reduction orientation. Since May, over 37,300 households have also received tie-down kits to further secure their shelters.

For more information please contact Fiona MacGregor at IOM Cox’s Bazar, Email: fmacgregor@iom.int, Tel: +88 0 1733 335221

Language English Posted: Tuesday, July 24, 2018 - 16:15Image: Region-Country: BangladeshDefault: Multimedia: 

Rohingya refugees walk past new emergency shelters built by IOM shelter teams in the Camp 20 Extension, Cox’s Bazar. Photo: IOM July 2018.

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

IOM Provides Emergency Assistance to Victims of Flash Floods in Burundi

Tue, 07/24/2018 - 10:08

Bujumbura – More than 1,000 flood-displaced households have received emergency shelters, non-food items (NFIs) and rental support from IOM, the UN Migration Agency, since heavy flooding struck southern and western parts of Burundi and in areas bordering Lake Tanganyika in May.

“When the floods occurred, my house was destroyed,” said Seraphina Havyarinana of Nyaza-Lac (Makamba), which, along with Gatumba (Bujumbura Rural) and Buterere (Bujumbura Mairie) hills, was the focus of IOM’s response. “I was desperate.”

The floods completely destroyed more than a thousand homes and left a further 4,000 households displaced and vulnerable. The affected households lost most of their belongings and were forced to seek shelter with their neighbours. Although her neighbour offered to provide temporary shelter for Seraphina and her children, she had no money for even the most basic commodities like soap.

Fortunately, nearly 140 host households received rental support for three months to cover shelter needs during the dry season, when access to employment in the agricultural sector is often scarce. Seraphina was relieved: “We welcomed this help. Having people who help you in such circumstances, I can only be grateful.”

Assistance was provided thanks to the support of the Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance (USAID/OFDA) and the Department for International Development (UK) in collaboration with the local administration and volunteers from the Burundi Red Cross and L'Organisation pour la Prévention et l'Intervention contre les Risques et Contingences who helped construct the shelters, among other activities.

“The support provided for flood victims was a great example of collaboration by members of the humanitarian community in Burundi,” said IOM Burundi Emergency Coordinator Sam Derbali. “All the activities were carried out in collaboration with the NFI/Shelter sector.”

An estimated 200 NFI kits comprised of two water containers, one bucket with a lid, a kitchen set, three sets of floor mats, blankets, mosquito nets and 2.5 kilograms of soap were distributed in Nyaza-Lac. The World Health Organization provided 597 pre-treated mosquito nets to complement the kits.

Fifty standard emergency shelters primarily composed of plastic sheets and wooden poles, were constructed. The beneficiaries will recycle the materials to build their houses in the future. Where possible the shelters were erected on the owners’ original plots of land. Where flood debris prevented this, they were constructed on land belonging to their neighbours with their approval.

As part of IOM’s ongoing project to support displaced populations, 30 durable shelters were also constructed in Nyaza-Lac. In Gatumba region, IOM provided 200 emergency shelters and 277 NFI kits to flood victims while 100 households received host/rental support in Buterere. In all the areas where shelter was provided, young people were engaging in the construction through cash for work programmes. A representative from OFDA along with IOM’s team visited Nyanza-Lac to assess the work.

In Burundi, IOM is committed to delivering emergency response to displaced victims of natural hazards and help build the preparedness of the communities most likely to be affected.

“Although we were able to assist the most vulnerable households, thousands remain displaced or impacted by the devastating effects of the rains,” said IOM’s Derbali. “We must continue our efforts to restore dignified living conditions for victims of natural hazards and raise awareness of the critical situation that many are still facing.”

For more information, please contact Marta Leboreiro Núñez in IOM Burundi, Tel +257 75 40 02 24, Email: mleboreiro@iom.int or Sam Derbali, Tel +257 75 40 05 55, Email: sderbali@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, July 24, 2018 - 16:15Image: Region-Country: BurundiDefault: Multimedia: 

Burundi flood survivor Tereza Ndikumana was one of dozens of Nyaza-Lac residents to receive emergency shelters. © IOM 2018/Triffin Ntore

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals Reach 53,269 in 2018; Deaths Reach 1,492

Tue, 07/24/2018 - 10:04

Geneva – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, reports that 53,269 migrants and refugees entered Europe by sea through 22 July 2018. That total compares to 110,603 at this time last year, and 244,722 at this time in 2016.

Arrivals to Spain (see chart below) this month have overtaken those to Italy. To date just over 36 per cent of all Mediterranean irregular migrants have come via the Western Mediterranean route, whose irregular migration volume has more than tripled those registered at this time last year. 

Arrivals to Italy are nearly identical, but still trail Spain by just over 1,600 arrivals. Greece counts about 29 per cent of all arrivals. Significantly, Greece’s arrivals thus far in 2018 are running almost 5,000 ahead of last year’s totals on this date, an increase of better than 50 per cent. Arrivals to Italy, on the other hand, are down over 80 per cent compared to 2017 data.

IOM Rome’s Flavio Di Giacomo reported Thursday (19 July) that the number (3,136) of irregular migrant arrivals to Italy by sea in June this year was the lowest recorded by Italian authorities since 2014 (see chart below).

Nonetheless in the month of June the Central Mediterranean route linking Italy to North Africa recorded the highest number of June deaths along this channel in the past four years. In June 2018, some 564 migrants were reported drowned or missing in the waters between North Africa and Sicily. That compares with 529 in 2017, with 388 in 2016, five in 2015 and 314 in 2014. Through 18 July, 153 additional fatalities have been recorded on this route.

 

IOM’s Missing Migrants Project has documented the deaths of 1,492 men, women and children seeking to cross the Mediterranean in 2018 – more than half of those deaths since 1 June.
Most recently IOM’s Missing Migrants Project has documented the deaths of a woman and a man whose remains were recovered in Tajoura and Garabulli, Libya on 19 July. MMP also recorded a tragedy on the Turkey-Greece border, where a woman and her three children drowned in the Evros/Meriç river on 19 July. They were crossing the river with another five people in an attempt to reach Greece when their boat capsized. The bodies of the 36-year-old Turkish woman and her one-year-old son were recovered on 20 July on the Turkish side of the river, while a search and rescue operation is still underway to locate the remains of her two other children, aged 5 and 7.

IOM Libya’s Christine Petré on Monday (23 July) reported that over the weekend, 156 migrants were returned to Libyan soil by the Libyan Coast Guard.  On Saturday (21 July), 40 migrants (31 men, eight women, one child) were returned to Libyan shore after having embarked on a rubber boat in Zuwara. The migrants received IOM’s emergency assistance including food, water and health care including pregnancy check-ups for two women. One of the women was in critical condition and received first aid before being transferred to a nearby hospital. The migrants came from Nigeria, Morocco, Egypt and Syria. Following humanitarian assistance, each was transferred to Tajoura detention centre.

On Sunday (22 July), 116 migrants (111 men, five women) who left Libya on a rubber boat in Garaboli received IOM’s emergency assistance including food, water, health care and protection screenings after being intercepted by the Libyan Coast Guard. Most of the migrants – from Sudan, Ghana, Mali, Nigeria, Côte d’Ivoire, Chad, Egypt and Gambia – suffered from headaches, muscle pain and scabies. Those migrants also were transferred to Tajoura detention centre. 
So far this year, 12,136 migrants have been returned to Libyan shore, Petré said.

IOM Madrid’s Ana Dodevska reported Monday that total arrivals at sea in 2018 have reached 19,586 men, women and children, irregular migrants who have been rescued in Western Mediterranean waters through 22 July, with nearly 1,000 arriving over the weekend. With this month’s figures Spain is the Mediterranean’s most-sought destination for irregular migrants traveling by sea, surpassing Italy and Greece.

Additionally, 3,125 migrants have attempted to enter Spain irregularly via the country’s African enclaves of Melilla and Ceuta, according to Spanish authorities.  

As remarkable as Spain’s rise in irregular migration activity has been through 2018, even more important is its recent surge. Over the year’s first five months, a total of 8,150 men, women and children were rescued in Spanish waters after leaving Africa – an average of 54 per day. In the 52 days since May 31, a total of 11,436 have arrived – or just under 220 migrants per day (see chart below).

IOM Athens’ Christine Nikolaidou said Monday that IOM has learned from the Hellenic Coast Guard (HCG) of at least three incidents requiring search and rescue operations between 19 and 22 July off the islands of Lesvos, Samos, and Chios. The HCG rescued a total of 87 migrants and transferred them to those islands. At least 245 landed on those same islands without intervention – plus 79 more on Kos, Megisti and Oinouses – bringing to 411 the total arrivals during those four days.

Through 22 July, the total number of sea arrivals to Greek territory since January 1 is 15,351.

April remains the busiest month for irregular migration by land and sea to Greece, with a total of 7,009 men, women and children arriving. February was the lowest with 1,610 (see charts below).

 

IOM’s Kristina Uzelac reported that almost 13,000 irregular migrants have been registered in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro and Albania between January and the second week of July 2018. Of those, some 70 per cent have been apprehended by the Bosnian police, a total of 9,035 as of 15 July 2018. One third of all migrants registered were from Pakistan (33 per cent). Syrian nationals represent the second largest nationality group (16 per cent) followed by migrants from Afghanistan (12 per cent), the Islamic Republic of Iran (12 per cent) and Iraq (9 per cent).

Considering the limited capacity of official reception centres in the country (120 in Asylum and 100 in the Closed Reception centre), majority of migrants must stay in alternative shelters, mainly in the north-western part of the country, near the border with Croatia. IOM mobile teams have assisted more than 1,600 individuals with transportation, legal counsel, interpreter services, and medical referrals.

Reported arrivals to Albania are stable with estimated 38 to 40 apprehensions on entry into the country on a weekly basis. As of 14 July, authorities in Albania registered 1,305 irregular migrants on entry to the country and another 651 who were intercepted exiting the country to Montenegro.

Registered migrants are predominantly Syrian, Pakistani and Iraqi. Since 1 January, an estimated 2,283 irregular migrants have entered Montenegro, mainly from Albania. Almost half of all migrants were of Syrian origin (44 per cent). Pakistani nationals were the second largest group comprising 18 per cent of the overall arrivals, followed by Algerian (11 per cent) and Iraqi (7 per cent) nationals.

According to available data, irregular entries to Croatia and Slovenia also have increased between January and June 2018 when compared with the same period in 2017. In Croatia, Border Police reported 2,552 irregular entries this year, a 97 per cent increase compared to 1,297 reported in the same period last year and 11 per cent more than the total of 2,292 reported for the whole 2017.

Data from Slovenian Ministry of Interior indicate a four-fold increase in irregular entries between the second quarter of 2017 and 2018. At the end of June 2018, there were 3,266 registered irregular entries versus 748 reported at the end of June 2018 (1,930 reported in the whole of 2017). Available nationality breakdown indicates that the majority of intercepted migrants in both countries are from Pakistan, Algeria, Turkey, Syrian Arab Republic and Afghanistan.

According to available data from the official website of the Croatian Ministry of Interior, there were at least 13 incidents related to migrant smuggling in the past two months. The Croatian police arrested 21 people under suspicion of human smuggling. Arrested individuals were from Austria, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Syrian Arab Republic, Pakistan, Iraq, Croatia, Serbia and Bosnia and Herzegovina, proving the international character of the smuggling networks operating in the region.

Worldwide, IOM’s Missing Migrants Project has documented the deaths of 2,255 people while migrating in 2018 (see chart below).

Besides the Mediterranean region, MMP reported that in the Horn of Africa, at least five people drowned in the Gulf of Aden when the boat in which they were travelling with 160 people capsized off the coast of Yemen on 19 July. The remains of two women and one man were retrieved in Al Shoghayrat, Shabwa Governorate, Yemen, while according to survivors’ testimonies, two men remain missing.

On the US-Mexico border, three people died recently while trying to cross into the United States. According to the Mexican Consulate in Eagle Pass, the remains of a 40-year-old man, of unknown identity, were found in a ranch near Carrizo Springs, Texas on 19 July. The day after, Mexican civil protection authorities recovered the body of a young man from the Río Bravo/Grande, near the second international bridge in Piedras Negras, Coahuila. On 21 July, after receiving a distress call, US Border Patrol officers found the body of a 34-year-old Guatemalan man who had died of dehydration in a ranch near Hebbronville, Texas.

In Mexico, a young migrant was killed by a freight train on 19 July. He was severely injured after falling from the top of the train in which he was travelling north to the US border, and died at the hospital in Saltillo, Coahuila a few hours later.
Missing Migrants Project data are compiled by IOM staff but come from a variety of sources, some of which are unofficial. To learn more about how data on migrants’ deaths and disappearances are collected, click here.

 

 

For latest arrivals and fatalities in the Mediterranean, please visit: http://migration.iom.int/europe
Learn more about the Missing Migrants Project at: http://missingmigrants.iom.int

For more information, please contact:
Joel Millman at IOM HQ, Tel: +41 79 103 8720, Email: jmillman@iom.int
Flavio Di Giacomo, IOM Coordination Office for the Mediterranean, Italy, Tel: +39 347 089 8996, Email: fdigiacomo@iom.int
Hicham Hasnaoui, IOM Morocco, Tel: + 212 5 37 65 28 81, Email: hhasnaoui@iom.int
Atigoni Avgeropoulou, IOM Greece, Tel :   +30 210 99 19 040 ext. 166; M. +30 69 48 92 98 09, Email: aavgeropoulou@iom.int
Kelly Namia, IOM Greece, Tel: +30 210 991 2174, Email: knamia@iom.int
Ivona Zakoska, IOM Regional DTM, Austria, Tel: + +43 1 5812222, Email: izakoska@iom.int
Julia Black, IOM GMDAC, Germany, Tel: +49 30 278 778 27, Email: jblack@iom.int
Christine Petré, IOM Libya, Tel: +216 29 240 448, Email: chpetre@iom.int
Ana Dodevska, IOM Spain. Tel: +34 91 445 7116, Email: adodevska@iom.int
Myriam Chabbi, IOM Tunisia, Mobile: +216 28 78 78 05, Tel: +216 71 860 312 (Ext 109 ), Email: mchabbi@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, July 24, 2018 - 16:10Image: Region-Country: SwitzerlandDefault: Multimedia:  Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Migration Mainstreamed Across AIDS2018 Conference in the Netherlands

Tue, 07/24/2018 - 10:04

Geneva The 22nd International AIDS Conference kicked off in Amsterdam yesterday (23/07) and will run until 27 July. The flagship conference has been held annually since 1985, and has become the largest global health conference worldwide. It provides a platform for Governments, policy makers, academics and public health professionals from around the world to convene, to bring bringing together the latest evidence in advocacy, science, and human rights.

The theme of this year’s conference is Breaking Barriers, Building Bridges, and efforts will focus on ways to more effectively reach key populations, including in Eastern Europe, Central Asia, North-African and Middle Eastern regions, where data shows epidemics are growing.

There is a clear relationship between population movement and the spread of HIV; however, it is not the one that mainstream media often choose to portray. Migration is not a risk factor for HIV transmission, but migration may place people in situations of higher risk, and even more fundamental are the risks that may cause people to move in the first place. 

“We are thrilled to see migration as a cross-cutting issue at the AIDS conference this year, represented in abstracts, oral presentations, and various side events including a satellite session co-hosted by UNAIDS and IOM on HIV and migration within the fast track agenda [in which migrants are identified as a priority population for targeted response],’’ said Jacqueline Weekers, IOM’s Director of Migration Health.

Between 2010 and 2017, through its Migration Health Division, and working closely with government, UN and other partners, IOM implemented 79 HIV-specific projects in 57 countries with a total expenditure of nearly USD 100 million. At the country level this encompasses delivery of comprehensive HIV prevention packages; surveillance, research and epidemiological modelling of HIV vulnerabilities among migrant and mobile populations; and direct provision of HIV and sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services to key populations including testing, treatment, care and support.

IOM also supports Member States in addressing the vulnerabilities to HIV and the specific health-care needs experienced by migrant and mobile populations, including review of policies related to restrictions on entry based on HIV status, with a view to elimination of such restrictions.

‘’We are proud of the work IOM does globally in the field of HIV prevention and response, and the AIDS conference provides a platform to showcase these efforts, and join forces with brilliant minds globally, to fortify evidence-based approaches to halting and reversing the HIV epidemic by 2030,’’ explained Dr. Poonam Dhavan, Senior IOM Migration Health Policy Advisor.

IOM, alongside UNAIDS (with whom a renewed MOU was signed in December 2017), Member States and partners, shares a common commitment to responding effectively to the new challenges posed by both increasing migration and by the spread of HIV, while respecting and maintaining human rights and dignity – together the global community can reach target 3.3 of the Sustainable Development Goals, and end the AIDS epidemic by 2030.

Read more about IOM’s HIV work here.

For more information please contact IOM’s Migration Health Division: mhddpt@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, July 24, 2018 - 16:05Image: Region-Country: SwitzerlandDefault: Multimedia: 

School girls in South Sudan learn about HIV and hygiene. © IOM 2017/Amanda Nero

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Nigerian Journalists Agree on First Code of Conduct for Ethical Journalism on Migration

Tue, 07/24/2018 - 10:03

Benin City – Forty-five (45) Nigerian journalists joined forces to draft the first code of conduct for ethical journalism about migrants, returnees and displaced populations in Nigeria. The document was presented following discussions during the Media Workshop on Migration hosted by IOM, the UN Migration Agency, from 18 to 20 July in Benin City.

The purpose of the training was to equip media professionals from print, TV and radio outlets with the tools and terminology to talk about migration to their audiences in an accurate and humane manner. It also served to sensitize journalists about IOM’s work in Nigeria, including the assisted voluntary return and reintegration programme which has assisted over 10,000 Nigerians to come home from Libya mainly, the humanitarian response in the country’s North-East region and the Migrants as Messengers initiative, a peer-to-peer messaging campaign that works with returning migrants to share their stories about the realities of irregular migration.

“Media professionals play a key role in Nigerian society," said Florence Kim, IOM Regional Media and Communications Officer for West and Central Africa. "They have the power to initiate a national dialogue on topics such as migration. In a migration-prone country such as Nigeria, we need to ensure that journalists can cover migration in an informed way. For the first time in West Africa, 45 journalists decided on the guiding principles they will follow to better inform the public on migration. This is one of IOM’s largest and most promising media engagement achievements in the region.”

The trainees joined a brainstorming session during which they shared ideas about the principles, terminology and key elements of the code of conduct, which they will present to their editors and fellow journalists for adoption.

The participants also had the opportunity to visit IOM reintegration projects in Edo State, the main state of departure for thousands of Nigerian migrants-where returnees are currently participating in collective reintegration activities such as poultry farming. They also heard testimonies of migrants coming back from Libya, such as Victory, a young man from Edo State who faced starvation and physical abuse on his journey. 51 per cent of the 9,159 Nigerian returnees assisted since April 2017 come from Edo State.

“One of my favorite moments was listening to the returnees tell their stories,” said Nwakaego Ohaegbulam, a radio host from HotFM radio station in Owerri. “Besides getting to know how to refer to migrants more humanely, I learned about the importance of reliable data on migration, like the fact that most international migrants come from Europe and not from Africa.”

The workshop was funded by the EU-IOM Joint Initiative for Migrant Protection and Reintegration which facilitates orderly, safe, regular and responsible migration governance through the development of rights-based and development-focused policies and processes on protection and sustainable reintegration. The EU-IOM Joint Initiative, funded by the EU Emergency Trust Fund for Africa, covers and has been set up in close cooperation with a total of 26 African countries, among which 13 in West and Central Africa

The workshop was also made possible with the support from the Government of the Netherlands under the Migrants as Messengers project.

For more information, please contact:
Jorge Galindo at IOM Nigeria, Tel: +234 906 273 9168, Email: jgalindo@iom.int
Florence Kim at IOM RO Dakar, Tel:  +221786206213, Email: fkim@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, July 24, 2018 - 16:00Image: Region-Country: NigeriaDefault: Multimedia: 

Journalists pose for a photo at the end of a three-day training on migration reporting in Benin City, the main place of origin for half of the irregular Nigerian migrants on the Central Mediterranean route.

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Uganda | Press Release | 18 July 2018

Fri, 07/20/2018 - 12:37
Language English Posted: Friday, July 20, 2018 - 18:03Image: Region-Country: UgandaThemes: Migrant AssistanceRelated Documents:  uganda_pr_20180718.pdfDefault: Multimedia: 

IOM Uganda Chief of Mission, Ali Abdi (right), hands over a box of VHF radios and accessories to Marine Police Deputy Commandant, Micheal Walwanga (left), at Sebagoro landing site in Kikuube district, western Uganda. Photo: Mary-Sanyu Osire / IOM

Police officers use children to demonstrate how to wear two of the life jackets donated by the IOM/UN-CERF project at Sebagoro landing site in Kikuube district, western Uganda. Photo: Mary-Sanyu Osire / IOM

The handover ceremony was attended by representatives from the refugee community, host community and local leaders. Photo: Mary-Sanyu Osire / IOM

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

IOM Identifies 970,000 Displaced People in Ethiopia's Gedeo, West Guji Since April

Fri, 07/20/2018 - 09:27

Addis Ababa – Violent clashes between communities on the border of Ethiopia's Southern Nations, Nationalities, and Peoples' Region (SNNPR) and Oromia regions have forced at least 970,000 people to flee their homes since April 2018, most becoming displaced in June alone.

Rapid woreda (district) level assessments conducted by IOM's Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) teams have found that 822,187 people are displaced in Gedeo zone (SNNPR region) and at least 147,040 people in West Guji (Oromia region). Due to ongoing security concerns and access problems, IOM's DTM teams could only assess internal displacement in four of the six woredas in West Guji where people are displaced. 

In both zones, most of the displaced population are staying with local communities (Gedeo: 514,446; West Guji: 84,681), while the remainder are sheltering in collective sites (Gedeo: 307,741; West Guji: 62,359) such as schools, government properties, spontaneous sites and disused or unfinished buildings. 

The buildings in the collective sites generally are not fit for human habitation and are extremely overcrowded – forcing many people to sleep outside on dirt, rarely with anything but a single sheet of tarpaulin shielding them from the rain. 

Mujib is sheltering in a small four by five metre area of dirt ground that he shares with 26 other displaced people, many of whom are his former neighbours. "This place is very cold. We don’t have enough food, and our children are not getting proper nutrition,” said Mujib. Part of the 26 is Mujib's family of eight, including his mother, brothers, wife and two-year-old daughter. “I do not know what the impact of all this is going to be on the lives of our children. This is hard to imagine right now,” he added.  

The assessments identified 80 collective sites and 103 host community locations in Gedeo and 21 collective sites and 60 host community locations in West Guji. Food was reported as the primary need in both zones. This is in addition to major shelter needs, as well as concerns over access to safe sanitation. A more detailed assessment of displacement sites in both zones is currently underway, which will produce more qualitative data in terms of how many people are displaced and their needs.  

IOM's country-wide DTM Round 11, conducted in May and June 2018, identified 1,776,685 internally displaced persons in Ethiopia, of which 1,204,577 are displaced due to conflict and 536,321 due to climate change. 

Since June, IOM has been scaling up its response in Gedeo and West Guji. Over the last two weeks, in addition to assessments, IOM has constructed over 190 latrines of a planned 263, four communal shelters of a planned 40, two communal kitchens, as well hosted workshops with the government on site management.

For more information, please contact Olivia Headon in Ethiopia, Tel: +251902484062, Email: oheadon@iom.int 

Language English Posted: Friday, July 20, 2018 - 15:00Image: Region-Country: EthiopiaThemes: Internally Displaced PersonsDefault: Multimedia: 

IOM's site management team discusses living conditions with displaced Ethiopians. Photo: Olivia Headon/IOM 2018
 

Mujib with his mother, wife and young daughter in the "shelter" they share with 26 people. Photo: Olivia Headon/IOM 2018
 

Some of the inhabitants of Mujib's shelter - there are 26 in total – mostly extended family members and neighbours. Photo: Olivia Headon/IOM 2018

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals Reach 51,782 in 2018; Deaths Reach 1,490

Fri, 07/20/2018 - 09:26

Geneva – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, reports that 51,782 migrants and refugees entered Europe by sea through 18 July 2018. That total compares to 110,189 at this time last year, and 244,722 at this time in 2016.

Arrivals to Spain (see chart below) this month have overtaken those to Italy. To date just over 36 per cent of all Mediterranean irregular migrants have come via the Western Mediterranean route, whose irregular migration volume has nearly tripled those registered at this time last year. 

Arrivals to Italy are nearly identical, but still trail Spain by just over 800 arrivals. Greece counts about 29 per cent of all arrivals. Significantly, Greece’s arrivals thus far in 2018 are running almost 5,000 ahead of last year’s totals on this date, an increase of better than 50 per cent. Arrivals to Italy, on the other hand, are down over 80 per cent compared to 2017 data.

IOM Rome’s Flavio Di Giacomo reported Thursday that the number (3,136) of irregular migrant arrivals to Italy by sea in June this year was the lowest recorded by Italian authorities since 2014 (see chart below).
Nonetheless, in the month of June, the Central Mediterranean route linking Italy to North Africa recorded the highest number of deaths along this channel in the past four years. In June 2018, some 564 migrants were reported drowned or missing in the waters between North Africa and Sicily. That compares with 529 in 2017, with 388 in 2016, five in 2015 and 314 in 2014. Through 18 July, 153 additional fatalities have been recorded on this route.

IOM’s Missing Migrants Project has documented the deaths of 1,490 men, women and children seeking to cross the Mediterranean in 2018 – more than half of those deaths since 1 June.
Most recently, at least 44 people died in a shipwreck 16 miles off the coast of Northern Cyprus. On 18 July, 103 survivors and the remains of 19 people were recovered from a sinking boat near Gialousa/Yeni Erenköy, on the Karpass peninsula, in Cyprus. According to survivors’ testimonies, an estimated 25 people remain missing. A search and rescue operation is ongoing.
IOM Libya's Christine Petré reported Thursday that on during this week (18 July) 156 migrants—122  men, 24 women and 10 children—were returned to Libyan shore by the Libyan Coast Guard. The majority were from Guinea, Sudan, Nigeria and Mali.
IOM doctors provided health assistance including to three pregnant women. Furthermore, she reported, the previous day (17 July) 164 migrants—93 men, 32 women, 39 children—were rescued from a rubber boat after having spent 48 hours at sea during an interception conducted 76 nautical miles off Al-Khums. The remains of one child were retrieved.
So far in 2018, 11,980 migrants have been returned to Libyan shore after attempting to reach Europe. IOM Libya also reported separately that the remains of two bodies (one man and one woman) were retrieved on 19 July) in Tajoura and Garaboli.
On 17 July, Spanish NGO Proactiva Open Arms recovered the remains of a young woman and a child from a damaged rubber boat 80 nautical miles off the coast of Libya. They also found one survivor, a young woman from Cameroon. They are expected to disembark in Palma de Mallorca, Spain on Saturday (21 July).

IOM Madrid’s Ana Dodevska reported Thursday that total arrivals at sea in 2018 have reached 18,653 men, women and children, irregular migrants who have been rescued in Western Mediterranean waters through 18 July. With these latest figures Spain is the Mediterranean’s most-sought destination for irregular migrants traveling by sea, surpassing Italy and Greece.

Additionally, nearly 3,000 more migrants (2,874 according to Spanish authorities) have attempted to enter Spain irregularly via the country’s African enclaves of Melilla and Ceuta.  

As remarkable as Spain’s rise in irregular migration activity has been through 2018, even more important is its recent surge. Over the year’s first five months, a total of 8,150 men, women and children were rescued in Spanish waters after leaving Africa – an average of 54 per day. In the 48 days since June 30, a total of 10,503 have arrived – or just under 220 migrants per day (see charts below).

IOM Athens’ Christine Nikolaidou said Thursday that IOM learned of at least one incident over three days (16-18 July) requiring a search and rescue operation off the island of Kos. The Hellenic Coast Guard rescued a total of nine migrants and transferred them to that island. At least 39 more migrants landed at Kos without assistance from the Coast Guard over these same three days.

Moreover, another 214 migrants were reported landing without Coast Guard assistance at Chios, Samos and Lesvos – bringing to 262 the total number of arrivals during those days. Through 18 July, the total number of sea arrivals to Greek territory since 1 January is 14,940.

April remains the busiest month for irregular migration by land and sea to Greece, with a total of 7,009 men, women and children arriving. February was the lowest with 1,610 (see charts below).


Worldwide, IOM’s Missing Migrants Project has documented the deaths of 2,240 people while migrating in 2018 (see chart below).
In addition to Mediterranean deaths, MMP reported that on the Niger-Algeria border, IOM Niger reported that two migrants died in the desert after being repatriated from Algeria. IOM staff stationed in Assamaka, Niger found the remains of two Nigerien men on 16 July. They were found under some car remains where they had taken cover.
On the US-Mexico border, US Border Patrol officers found four migrants with signs of dehydration in a ranch west of Laredo, Texas on 15 July. Tragically, one of them, a Mexican national, passed away before reaching the hospital. Additionally, the Missing Migrants Project team also recorded the death of another Mexican national earlier in July, who drowned in the All-American Canal near Calexico, California on 6 July.
Missing Migrants Project data are compiled by IOM staff but come from a variety of sources, some of which are unofficial. To learn more about how data on migrants’ deaths and disappearances are collected, click here.

For latest arrivals and fatalities in the Mediterranean, please visit: http://migration.iom.int/europe
Learn more about the Missing Migrants Project at: http://missingmigrants.iom.int

For more information, please contact:
Joel Millman at IOM HQ, Tel: +41 79 103 8720, Email: jmillman@iom.int
Flavio Di Giacomo, IOM Coordination Office for the Mediterranean, Italy, Tel: +39 347 089 8996, Email: fdigiacomo@iom.int
Hicham Hasnaoui, IOM Morocco, Tel: + 212 5 37 65 28 81, Email: hhasnaoui@iom.int
AtigoniAvgeropoulou, IOM Greece, Tel: +30 210 99 19 040 ext. 166; M. +30 69 48 92 98 09, Email: aavgeropoulou@iom.int
Kelly Namia, IOM Greece, Tel: +30 210 991 2174, Email: knamia@iom.int
IvonaZakoska, IOM Regional DTM, Austria, Tel: + +43 1 5812222, Email: izakoska@iom.int
Julia Black, IOM GMDAC, Germany, Tel: +49 30 278 778 27, Email: jblack@iom.int
Christine Petré, IOM Libya, Tel. +216 29 240 448, Email: chpetre@iom.int
Ana Dodevska, IOM Spain, Tel: +34 91 445 7116, Email: adodevska@iom.int
Myriam Chabbi, IOM Tunisia, Mobile: +216 28 78 78 05, Tel: +216 71 860 312 (Ext. 109), Email: mchabbi@iom.int

Language English Posted: Friday, July 20, 2018 - 14:55Image: Region-Country: SwitzerlandThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesMissing MigrantsDefault: Multimedia:  Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

IOM Delivers Food, Tents and Medical Assistance to Thousands of Newly Displaced Yemenis

Fri, 07/20/2018 - 09:26

Al Hudaydah – IOM, the UN Migration Agency staff in Yemen are delivering assistance to thousands of people displaced by heavy fighting around the strategic port city of Al Hudaydah this week.
 
“We and our partners are working in a difficult environment in hopes of alleviating some of the hardship people are experiencing by providing food, and non-food items (NFIs), shelter kits and good quality tents we’ve just received from the Department for International Development (UK),” said Stefano Pes, IOM Yemen’s Officer in Charge.
 
“The situation is very bad and we’re doing our best to provide them with temporary shelter and support for the time being.”
 
Civilian casualties and mass displacements continue to mount amidst intense fighting that began on 12 June. It has caused further damage to ravaged public services that has affected water supplies, forced shops to close resulting in shortages in essential commodities, complicated the delivery of humanitarian assistance and resulted in the closure of a temporary feeding centre in Zabid.
 
The fortunate few are traveling to the relative safely of Sana’a, Aden and Thamar but the majority of the population have already exhausted their reserves, forcing them to seek protection wherever they can.
 
Fifty IOM staff are working in various locations to assist migrants and an estimated 50,000 newly displaced Yemenis in Al Hudaydah. In coordination with its partners, IOM is providing shelter kits and NFIs to 1,400 households in Bait Al Fakeeh. In Hays and Al Khookh, internally displaced persons (IDPs) have received 165 food baskets and IOM’s Migrant Response Point (MRP) compound is today sheltering and providing services to 41 displaced Yemenis. The organization has also provided 7,830 meals to children in three Al Hudaydah schools. The IDPs have received 400 boxes of dates, nearly 1,600 people have received free consultations at IOM’s clinic and 40 pregnant women have received counselling.
 
Located in the western part of the country, Al Hudaydah is the primary gateway for food and humanitarian aid for a population on the verge of starvation. Humanitarian organizations fear the port closure will lead to further forced displacements of people in a country where two million are already displaced and in need of humanitarian assistance.
 
For more information, please contact Saba Malme at IOM Yemen, Tel: + 967 736 800 329; Email: smalme@iom.int

 

Language English Posted: Friday, July 20, 2018 - 14:50Image: Region-Country: YemenThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesInternally Displaced PersonsDefault: Multimedia: 

A child from Hudaydah receiving non-food items from one of IOM's distribution sites.

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Kenya’s Draft National Migration Policy Integrates Global Compact Commitments

Fri, 07/20/2018 - 09:25

Nairobi The Government of Kenya, through the National Coordination Mechanism on Migration (NCM), convened a national validation-consultation meeting on its draft Migration Policy on Tuesday (17/07). The meeting brought together 45 delegates from the central government, the counties, legislature, academic and research institutions, as well as international agencies.

Dan Opon, Chairman of the NCM Secretariat, acknowledged the importance of the inputs from a broad range of stakeholders in making the draft migration policy align with international standards and realities of citizens, migrants, and refugees.

The draft policy provides a roadmap to address impacts and challenges of migration and is informed by relevant international, regional and national frameworks including the Kenya Vision 2030, the Big 4 agenda, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG), the Global Compact for Migration (GCM), Migration Governance Framework, the African Union Migration Framework and the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD) regional migration policy framework aimed at promoting safe, orderly and humane migration.

Thematic discussions on forced migration; migration and development; facilitation of international mobility; border management; and crosscutting issues such migration and education; health; human rights; environment; gender; and addressing vulnerabilities in migration were also revisited in plenary sessions among other topics. The delegates dissected the objectives and strategies by section. After this validation session, the NCM will be submitting the refined document for adoption by the Government of Kenya.

Raouf Mazou, UNHCR Kenya Country Representative, noted the recognition of refugees and asylum seekers’ needs as well as the role of host communities, and the respect for non-refoulement in the draft comprehensive policy. He also commended Kenya’s historical role in hosting large numbers of refugees from neighbouring countries.

Michael Pillinger, IOM Kenya Country Office Chief of Mission, recognized the months of hard work done by NCM members to reflect on the benefits and risks of migration, international and internal processes as well as the victims of irregular migration processes.

Pillinger emphasized the importance of social cohesion and broader cooperation of local and regional stakeholders towards durable solutions for internally displaced persons (IDPs) and their host communities. IOM Kenya and IGAD have supported the consultative processes since 2017. The validation workshop also provided an opportunity for validating the Kenya Migration Profile (2015).

For more information please contact Michael Pillinger at IOM Kenya Country Office, Tel: +254 20 4221 161, Email: mpillinger@iom.int

Language English Posted: Friday, July 20, 2018 - 14:45Image: Region-Country: KenyaEurope and Central Asia/RomaniaThemes: Global CompactGlobal Compact on MigrationMigration PolicyDefault: Multimedia: 

Michael Pillinger of IOM Kenya and UNHCR Country Representative Raouf Mazou follow proceedings at consultative meeting about Kenya’s draft Migration Policy 

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Belarusian Youth to Develop Counter-trafficking Preventive Initiatives

Fri, 07/20/2018 - 09:18

Minsk On 16 July the second Learn.Act.Share youth summer camp kicked off near Minsk, in the very centre of Belarus, uniting 18 active young people from different regions in their desire to LEARN about the human trafficking problem and then ACT and SHARE the knowledge in their communities.

The six-day summer camp offers participants interactive and informative workshops, trainings and master-classes to familiarize them with human trafficking and related issues and on how to identify signs of human trafficking and what tools to use that make a difference in combatting such crimes.

The young people will end up devising their own preventive initiatives and mini-projects that they will implement throughout the coming year with expert support from IOM and several other partners from different UN and government agencies, NGOs and private companies. Moreover, they will join last year’s summer camp alumni in establishing a network of young agents in the region who contribute to the fight against modern slavery.

“In my application form I specified that I’m eager to learn how I can personally contribute to the prevention of human trafficking. I’m a very active person and I believe I will share the acquired knowledge with my peers,” said Margarita Goldenkova, one of the participants, after the first very dynamic and intensive camp day.

Zeynal Hajiyev, IOM Minsk Chief of Mission highlighted the importance of the partnership saying, “It’s the second time we are organizing such a camp together with partners from the government and UN agencies, public associations and private campaigns. We are glad that this year the list of partners has expanded. IOM always emphasizes the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to addressing human trafficking.”

Vladimir Emelyanov, the representative of the Ministry of the Interior admitted the importance of joint efforts and recognized the role of active youth “It’s better to prevent the problem than to solve it. This camp focuses exactly on prevention. Young leaders, the participants of the summer camp, will be able to tell their peers about human trafficking and its dangers and consequences.”

The youth summer camp is tailored to the World Day Against Trafficking in Persons, and is the part of the IOM X Belarus campaign launched together with the Ministry of the Interior of the Republic of Belarus with the support of USAID.

The IOM-led initiative is supported by the Ministries of the Interior and Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Belarus, UN agencies, private companies, NGOs, crowdfunding platform Talaka, the British Embassy in Minsk, USAID, and the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Daily video and photo updates will be available here 
For more information please contact Olga Borzenkova at IOM Belarus, Tel: +375 17 2882742. Email: oborzenkova@iom.int

Language English Posted: Friday, July 20, 2018 - 14:35Image: Region-Country: BelarusThemes: Counter-TraffickingMigration and YouthDefault: Multimedia: 

Participants of the 2nd youth summer camp “Act.Learn.Share” in Minsk Region, Belarus 

Photo: © IOM Belarus 2018 

Participants of the 2nd youth summer camp “Act.Learn.Share” in Minsk Region, Belarus 

Photo: © IOM Belarus 2018 

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

IOM: '86% Lost Sources of Income After Deadly Volcano Eruption in Guatemala'

Fri, 07/20/2018 - 09:17

Guatemala City – Today (07/19), IOM, the UN Migration Agency, reported that 86 per cent of people affected by Volcán de Fuego's eruption last month, lost their sources of income or their businesses. According to surveys conducted by IOM, 43 per cent were left without land to carry out agricultural activities and 13 per cent say they intend to migrate irregularly.

To address the emergency arising from the eruption, IOM has been working in close coordination with the Government of Guatemala. Two rounds of surveys have been conducted to evaluate the characteristics of the affected population. Additionally, actions have been taken to improve assistance to those in shelters, and to prevent human trafficking.

According to the last Survey on Expectations and Livelihoods, 41 per cent of the people interviewed need housing, work (25 per cent), land for agriculture (18 per cent) and economic aid (7 per cent). In addition, 9 per cent need training, scholarships, furniture, health supplies, among other services.

The information was gathered through interviews with people located in shelters through the Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM). It is already available to government authorities, United Nations agencies, international organizations and diplomatic corps, to provide a comprehensive response to the affected population’s needs.

The results have shown that all shelters have acceptable security perimeters and clinics for primary medical care. However, all active shelters are subject to some degree of vulnerability, particularly in the areas of water, sanitation, protection, and health. Therefore, IOM will administer USD 319,980 for the improvement of infrastructure conditions for shelters through the Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF).

At the same time, to prevent crimes of sexual violence and trafficking in people in shelters, the IOM Mesoamerica Program has provided informative materials for parents, children and adolescents in coordination with the Secretariat against Sexual Violence, Exploitation and Trafficking in Persons (SVET), as well as with the support of the Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration of the United States Department of State.

IOM has made available to the public a web page where the data, statistics, infographics and most relevant information from the affected areas will be constantly updated. You can access it here.

For more information, please contact Melissa Vega from IOM Guatemala, Email: mevega@iom.int or Alba Miriam Amaya from IOM El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras, Email:  aamaya@iom.int

Language English Posted: Friday, July 20, 2018 - 14:30Image: Region-Country: GuatemalaThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesInternally Displaced PersonsDefault: Multimedia: 

IOM has conducted surveys to identify the main needs of people living in shelters after the volcanic eruption. Photo: IOM/2018 

IOM has conducted surveys to identify the main needs of people living in shelters after the volcanic eruption. Photo: IOM/2018 

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Fate of Rohingya Refugees Discussed by IOM Chief and Bangladesh Prime Minister

Tue, 07/17/2018 - 11:20

Dhaka/Cox’s Bazar - Almost a million Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh face a triple threat of extreme weather, funding shortfalls and uncertainty about their future, William Lacy Swing, head of the UN Migration Agency, IOM, said today.

Director General Swing said it was crucial for the world to remain focused on the crisis, as a "failure to do so would have tragic outcomes for the nearly a million Rohingya refugees sheltering in Bangladesh." 

He made the remarks after reviewing progress by IOM and partners in managing the world’s largest refugee settlement in Cox’s Bazar discussions with Bangladesh’s Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina in Dhaka and an earlier meeting on Thursday with Myanmar’s State Counsellor Aung San Suu Kyi.

"The Rohingya in Cox’s Bazar are in danger of becoming the wretched of the earth, homeless and without a future," he said, adding, "The world must rally to support them."

Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina stated, "The wellbeing of the Rohingyas is our concern while they are here (in Cox’s Bazar Bangladesh)."

She also underscored the enormity of the impact that so many refugees are having on the local population and the need for global solidarity to find a solution to their plight and humanitarian aid to support them and the surrounding host communities.

Ambassador Swing previously visited Cox’s Bazar in October 2017, less than three months into a violent crisis which has sent more than 700,000 people fleeing over the border from Myanmar since late August 2017.

The Rohingya now live in desperately cramped conditions on bare sandy slopes, with only bamboo and tarpaulin shelters to protect them from the elements. All this in an area that suffers two cyclone seasons yearly and some of the heaviest monsoon conditions in the world.

Ambassador Swing noted the major improvements to the camps’ management and infrastructure carried out by IOM, and an entire spectrum of other UN agencies, NGOs as well as other organizations and the government, including access ways, bridges, drainage, sanitation and improved shelters.

However, as monsoon rains turned many hillsides to mud, Ambassador Swing warned that with just one quarter of joint funding appeal for the entire response met so far, much of the progress made in recent months was at serious risk of collapsing. That, he said, would create yet another life-threatening disaster for the Rohingya community.

Ambassador Swing, who met young mothers from the refugee and local Bangladeshi host community who had recently given birth at an IOM medical facility in the heart of the sprawling mega-camp stressed the vital role that such health services played for people in Cox’s Bazar whether refugee or local residents.

“Everyone must recognize, in addition to the refugees’ needs, the tremendous impact this crisis is having on the host community,” he said.

IOM has been working in Cox’s Bazar providing medical care to the local community long before the crisis which began last August, he noted.

“All mothers – refugees and locals – should have access to safe, hygienic facilities to give birth and it’s profoundly worrying that funding shortages are now threatening these crucial maternity services which are making such differences to the lives of women and babies from all backgrounds.”

Ambassador Swing praised the great hospitality of the local community and the government and people of Bangladesh as a whole in supporting the Rohingya refugees in what is now one of the world’s largest humanitarian responses.

“The world must recognize the hugely generous support that the Bangladesh government and host community here in Cox’s Bazar has offered these refugees who arrived in such desperate conditions with nothing.”

For more information please contact

Leonard Doyle at IOM HQ, Email: ldoyle@iom.int, Tel: +41 792857123
Fiona MacGregor, IOM Cox’s Bazar, Email: fmacgregor@iom.int, Tel: +88 0 1733 335221

Language English Posted: Tuesday, July 17, 2018 - 17:17Image: Region-Country: BangladeshThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesRefugee and Asylum IssuesRohingya CrisisDefault: Multimedia: 

IOM DG William Swing meets new mothers from the Rohingya refugee and local communities. Photo: IOM

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

IOM Upgrades Tanzania Regional Immigration Training Academy Forensic Lab

Tue, 07/17/2018 - 10:14

Moshi – Under the framework of a Dutch-funded project entitled Enhancing Migration Management in African States through Capacity Building on Integrated Border Management and Countering Irregular Migration, IOM, the UN Migration Agency, upgraded the forensic laboratory in the Tanzania Regional Immigration Training Academy (TRITA). This upgrade included the provision of equipment for examining travel documents, and IOM reference training manuals that are specifically designed for forensic labs such as the Passport Examination Procedures Manual (PEPM II) and the Document Examination Laboratory Manual for the Immigration Environment (DELMIE).

The newly upgraded forensic laboratory is used to train immigration officers from the African continent to detect fraudulent travel documents at entry points along African borders. Fraudulent documents are often used by criminals for the purpose of migrant smuggling and human trafficking.

The first group to benefit from the upgraded forensic laboratory training facility at ACBC/TRITA included 11 Immigration Officers from the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), who attended a Training of Trainers (ToT) course on Security Document and Fraud Detection from 9 to 13 July. The ToT course was led by experts at IOM’s African Capacity Building Center (ACBC) for Migration and Border Management in Moshi, under the framework of the Dutch-funded project. The ACBC cooperates closely with TRITA and other regional and continental bodies to further develop the capacity of African immigration officers from across the continent. This training aims to teach practical skills in travel document examination and fraudulent document detection, as well as techniques for the screening of travellers; within the ToT format, the goal is to significantly increase the pool of expert trainers in the DRC.

The training also aimed to promote understanding of growing and complex global migration challenges within the framework of an integrated border management approach. The programme also contributes to strengthening close cooperation between the Netherlands immigration authorities and the immigration authorities of several African countries.

The new document examination equipment was received for TRITA by Edward Paul Chogero, on behalf of Anna Makakala, the Commissioner General of Immigration (CGI) of Tanzania. Officials from the Tanzanian Ministry of Foreign Affairs (representing the Director of Multilateral Co-operation, Ambassador Celestine Mushy) and officials from TRITA also participated in the handover ceremony. While handing over the equipment to the Government officials, IOM Tanzania Chief of Mission, Qasim Sufi stressed that “the aim of upgrading the Forensic Laboratory in TRITA/ACBC is to create a state of the art training space, where the knowledge and skills of immigration officers from the African continent are further developed to effectively address irregular migration, combat migrant smuggling and human trafficking, and to more efficiently and effectively manage their borders.”

The event was widely covered by the media including national TV stations, radio and newspapers.

For more information, please contact IOM’s African Capacity Building Center in Moshi:
Marcellino Ramkishun, Tel: +255 786 067505, Email: mramkishun@iom.int
Nelson Goncalves, Tel: +255 27 275 3466, Email: ngoncalves@iom.int
Pamela Kyando, Tel: +255 27 275 3466, Email: pkyando@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, July 17, 2018 - 15:50Image: Region-Country: United Republic of TanzaniaThemes: Capacity BuildingIntegrated Border ManagementDefault: Multimedia: 

Representatives from the Tanzanian Immigration Service Department, the Government of the Netherlands, IOM and participants from DRC to the Training of Trainers on Security Document and Fraud Detection.

From left to right: Nelson Goncalves – IOM ACBC, Jan Willem Konig – Netherlands Repatriation and Departure Service, David Ferdinand Fupi – Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Dr Qasim Sufi – IOM Tanzania, Edward Paul Chogero – Tanzania Immigration Service Department , Marcellino Ramkishun – IOM ACBC. 

IOM ACBC expert introducing the new security document equipment features to the representative of the Tanzania Immigration Service Department.

DRC Immigration Officers benefiting from the new equipment during Training of Trainers on Security Document and Fraud Detection 

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals Reach 50,872 in 2018; Deaths Reach 1,443

Tue, 07/17/2018 - 10:08

Geneva – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, reports that 50,872 migrants and refugees entered Europe by sea through 15 July 2018. That total compares to 109,746 at this time last year, and 241,859 at this time in 2016.

Arrivals to Spain (see chart below) overtook those to Italy this past weekend. To date just over 35 per cent of all Mediterranean irregular migrants have come via the Western Mediterranean route, whose irregular migration volume has nearly tripled those registered at this time last year. 

Arrivals to Italy are nearly identical, but still trail Spain by about 200 arrivals. Greece counts about 29 per cent of all arrivals. Significantly, Greece’s arrivals thus far in 2018 are running almost 5,000 ahead of last year’s totals on this date, an increase of better than 50 per cent. Arrivals to Italy, on the other hand, are down over 80 per cent compared to 2017 data.

IOM Rome’s reports Monday remind us that, while lower in volume, the Central Mediterranean route remains the region’s deadliest, with almost four times the number of drownings as Spain has recorded since 1 January, despite almost identical arrival totals.
IOM Rome’s Flavio Di Giacomo reported Monday that 447 migrants – who left aboard a wooden fishing boat last Wednesday from the Libyan port of Zuwara – arrived in Pozzallo on Sunday. He reported the group had been rescued on Saturday morning by the Monte Sperone ship of the Italian Guardia di Finanza and the Frontex vessel Protector.
Di Giacomo added they had to wait in the harbour over 24 hours before receiving authorization to disembark, adding that the migrants arrived in “severe” health conditions due to the terrible detention experienced in Libya, in informal detention centres.
Migrants arriving at the port told IOM staff that four travelling companions died last Friday. Witnesses said all were on board, although without water or food, when they spotted another vessel, still not identified. Driven by despair, about 30 people jumped into the water trying to reach the ship, which was much too far away. Four drowned, all of Somali origin, including one 17-year-old boy.  These reports were later confirmed by the friends and relatives of the four migrants, who also were on board, Di Giacomo said.
IOM Rome on Monday also released new data from Italy’s Ministry of the Interior related to the nationalities of 16,566 irregular migrants arriving by sea through the end of June. Through this half-year, citizens of Tunisia comprise the largest single group, just over 3,000 individuals or almost one of every five arrivals. Fewer than 600 Tunisians were recorded through the first half of 2017, so this year’s activity is five times greater in volume.

Conversely, arrivals from the next nine largest nationalities – Eritrea, Sudan, Nigeria, Côte d’Ivoire, Mali, Guinea, Pakistan, Iraq and Algeria – all fell, in some cases quite substantially. Just 1,229 Nigerians were reported as arrivals in 2018 – compared to 14,118 at this time last year. Pakistan, which recorded 2,242 arrivals to Italy in the first half of 2017, recorded less than a third that number – 720 – through half of 2018. Côte d’Ivoire’s arrivals dropped to about 15 per cent of last year’s totals, as did those from Guinea (see chart below).

IOM Madrid’s Ana Dodevska reported Monday that total arrivals at sea in 2018 have reached 18,016 men, women and children, irregular migrants who have been rescued in Western Mediterranean waters through 15 July. With these latest figures Spain is the Mediterranean’s most-sought destination, for irregular migrants traveling by sea, surpassing Italy and Greece. Additionally, nearly 3,000 more migrants (2,874 according to Spanish authorities) have attempted to enter Spain irregularly via the country’s African enclaves of Melilla and Ceuta.  

As remarkable as Spain’s rise in irregular migration activity has been through 2018, even more important is its recent surge. Over the year’s first five months, a total of 8,150 men, women and children were rescued in Spanish waters after leaving Africa – an average of 54 per day. In the 45 days since June 30, a total of 9,866 have arrived – or just under 220 migrants per day (see charts below).

IOM Spain also reported Monday that over the past weekend Salvamento Maritimo rescue boats and Spanish Guardia Civil vessels saved more than 500 migrants in the Mediterranean. Most of them were rescued in the Strait of Gibraltar area and some others in the Alborán Sea. A majority were rescued and disembarked on the ports of Algeciras, Barbate and Tarifa; those rescued in the Alborán Sea disembarked at the port of Almería.


*The figures for June 2018 include the migrants who disembarked in Valencia from the
Aquarius boat – total of 630 migrants

Despite the rapid run up of arrivals to Spain, deaths on surrounding waters appear to have abated. In July – which has witnessed the arrival of nearly 3,000 irregular migrants – Spanish authorities have noted the death of a single migrant: a 19-year-old from Senegal, lost in Moroccan waters – although 55 drownings also were recorded the previous month, when nearly 7,000 arrivals also were recorded. June, however, was not the year's deadliest month in the Western Mediterranean. IOM's Missing Migrants Project recorded 89 migrant drownings on this route in April and 75 in February (see chart below).

2018

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Total

Western Mediterranean

28

75

25

89

21

55

1

294

 

IOM Athens’ Christine Nikolaidou said Monday that IOM learned of at least two incidents requiring search and rescue operations off the island of Lesvos. The Hellenic Coast Guard rescued a total of 109 migrants and transferred them to that island.
Another 177 migrants were reported landing without Coast Guard assistance at Kos, Chios, Samos and Rhodes – as well as to Lesvos – bringing to 286 the total number of arrivals during those five days. Through 15 July, the total number of sea arrivals to Greek territory since 1 January is 14,678. April remains the busiest month for irregular migration by land and sea to Greece, with a total of 7,009 men, women and children arriving. February was the lowest with 1,610 (see charts below).

IOM’s Missing Migrants Project (MMP) has documented the deaths of 1,443 migrants in the Mediterranean thus far this year. On 15 July, an estimated 17 people went missing off the coast of Sabratha, Libya. According to the testimonies of the 18 survivors who were rescued by local fishermen, there were originally 35 people on board. Unfortunately, no remains have been retrieved yet. The migrants come from Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana, Cameroon, Chad, Mali and Nigeria.
IOM Libya’s Christine Petré also on Monday reported that over the weekend (15 July), for the 18 migrants (six men, 11 women and one girl from Chad) who were rescued by fishermen off Sabratha, IOM provided emergency assistance in form of basic medical care.

On 16 July, eight migrants, including six children, were found dead inside a truck container in Zuwara, Libya. They died of suffocation due to inhalation of petrol fumes. Another 90 migrants were found in critical condition. Petré explained that the migrants are said to be from various sub-Saharan African and Arab countries, including Libya and Syria, in addition to Pakistan and Bangladesh.

According to information received, the truck – which was transporting over 100 migrants – was intercepted at around 02:00h on the morning of 16 July. The remaining 90 migrants recovered from the container were in critical condition and in need of urgent healthcare assistance.

Some of the survivors were transported to Zuwara hospital, where a hospital manager told IOM that there were 11 dead and 25 medical cases brought to the hospital. A Moroccan man among those brought in required admission to the ICU, and was referred to Sobrata hospital, as Zuwara hospital lacks ICU facilities.

An IOM medical doctor is at Sobrata hospital to assist in the reception and admission of the man, as well as assist with any present needs.

IOM Libya's Petré on Monday also reported that during the day 158 migrants (113 men, 34 women and nine children) were returned to shore by the Libyan Coast Guard. All received medical assistance through IOM’s local partner STACO. She added so far this year, 11,660 migrants were returned to Libyan shore.

IOM’s Missing Migrants Project has documented the deaths of 2,186 people while migrating in 2018 (see chart below).
In addition to Mediterranean deaths, MMP reported that on the Colombia-Panama border, a Cuban migrant drowned on 12 July in waters near Sapzurro, in Colombia’s northern department of Chocó. His body was recovered by the Colombian Navy authorities during an operation in the Gulf of Urabá in which 62 other migrants were rescued from a boat.
Missing Migrants Project data are compiled by IOM staff but come from a variety of sources, some of which are unofficial. To learn more about how data on migrants’ deaths and disappearances are collected, click here.

For latest arrivals and fatalities in the Mediterranean, please visit: http://migration.iom.int/europe
Learn more about the Missing Migrants Project at: http://missingmigrants.iom.int

For more information, please contact:
Joel Millman at IOM HQ, Tel: +41 79 103 8720, Email: jmillman@iom.int
Flavio Di Giacomo, IOM Coordination Office for the Mediterranean, Italy, Tel: +39 347 089 8996, Email: fdigiacomo@iom.int
Hicham Hasnaoui, IOM Morocco, Tel: + 212 5 37 65 28 81, Email: hhasnaoui@iom.int
Atigoni Avgeropoulou, IOM Greece, Tel:  +30 210 99 19 040 (Ext. 166), Mobile +30 69 48 92 98 09, Email: aavgeropoulou@iom.int
Kelly Namia, IOM Greece, Tel: +30 210 991 2174, Email: knamia@iom.int
Ivona Zakoska, IOM Regional DTM, Austria, Tel: + +43 1 5812222, Email: izakoska@iom.int
Julia Black, IOM GMDAC, Germany, Tel: +49 30 278 778 27, Email: jblack@iom.int
Christine Petré, IOM Libya, Tel: +216 29 240 448, Email: chpetre@iom.int
Ana Dodevska, IOM Spain, Tel: +34 91 445 7116, Email: adodevska@iom.int
Myriam Chabbi, IOM Tunisia, Mobile +216 28 78 78 05, Tel:  +216 71 860 312 (Ext. 109), Email: mchabbi@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, July 17, 2018 - 16:10Image: Region-Country: SwitzerlandThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesMissing MigrantsDefault: Multimedia:  Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

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