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Updated: 16 min 38 sec ago

Less than 5,000 Mediterranean Arrivals in Past Week

Tue, 09/05/2017 - 10:27

Geneva – IOM, the UN Migration Agency reports that 125,860 migrants and refugees entered Europe by sea in 2017 through 3 September. This compares with 289,681 arrivals across the region through 3 September 2016.

IOM’s Missing Migrant Project (MMP) recorded the first fatalities in the Mediterranean since 9 August: the Tunisian Red Cross reports that up to 120 people are feared to have drowned after a boat capsized last Wednesday (30/09) off the coast of Ben Guerdane, Tunisia. Only one Nigerien migrant survived the shipwreck.

Additionally, on Thursday last week, a ship carrying 45 migrants sank off the coast of Melilla, Spain. Seven women lost their lives in this incident, five of whom were reportedly from the Congo, while the other two were Guinean nationals. These deaths bring the total of fatalities in the Mediterranean in 2017 to 2,537. 

Worldwide, IOM’s MMP reports that there have been 3,649 fatalities in 2017 through 3 September (see chart below). MMP recorded one dead and one missing after one small boat carrying migrants trying to cross from Costa Rica to Nicaragua capsized on Friday night; and one train accident in Querétaro, Mexico.

Meanwhile, yesterday (04/09), the NGO Migrant Offshore Aid Station (MOAS) announced it was suspending its rescue operations in the Mediterranean and relocating its ship, the Phoenix, to South East Asia to rescue Rohingya refugees.
Latest Mediterranean Update infographic: http://migration.iom.int/docs/MMP/170905_Mediterranean_Update.pdf

For latest arrivals and fatalities in the Mediterranean, please visit: http://migration.iom.int/europe

Learn more about the Missing Migrants Project at: http://missingmigrants.iom.int

For more information, please contact:
Flavio Di Giacomo, IOM Italy, Tel: +39 347 089 8996, Email: fdigiacomo@iom.int
Kelly Namia, IOM Greece, Tel: +30 210 991 2174, Email: knamia@iom.int
Julia Black, IOM GMDAC, Tel: +49 30 278 778 27, Email: jblack@iom.int
Christine Petré, IOM Libya, Tel: +216 29 240 448, Email: chpetre@iom.int
Ana Dodevska, IOM Spain, Tel: +34 91 445 7116, Email: adodevska@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, September 5, 2017 - 16:01Image: Region-Country: SwitzerlandThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesMissing MigrantsRefugee and Asylum IssuesDefault: Multimedia:  Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Chile Hosts Regional Consultation for Latin America and Caribbean on Global Compact for Migration

Tue, 09/05/2017 - 10:18

Santiago – The Regional Consultation for Latin America and the Caribbean towards the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration (GCM) took place last week (30-31/08) in Santiago, Chile. The event was co-hosted by the United Nations (UN) Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC), the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDESA) and IOM, the UN Migration Agency.

The two-day consultation was the first of five regional consultations, which are part of the preparatory discussions to develop the GCM, an intergovernmental negotiation on all dimensions of international migration. As with previous consultations, the regional gathering in Santiago sought to discuss migration in a holistic and comprehensive manner.

The event brought together 45 international migration experts from Latin America and the Caribbean countries to discuss relevant migration topics in the region to provide inputs to governments for the negotiation phase of the GCM.

It also gathered representatives from the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR), UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), Pan-American Health Organization (PAHO), UN Children's Fund (UNICEF) and the UN Population Fund (UNFPA).

During her opening remarks, IOM Deputy Director General Laura Thompson said that the Global Compact represents an invaluable opportunity for the international community to work on a common vision to ensure a well-managed migration governance, as well as to promote the positive effects that benefit migrants, governments and societies.

“The common vision includes protecting the human rights of migrants, facilitating a safe, regular and orderly migration, reducing the incidence of forced migration, and responding to the impacts of mobility caused by natural disasters or environmental reasons,” stressed Ambassador Thompson

Ambassador Thompson also underlined that Latin American and Caribbean countries have already contributed to the global debate on migration, ensuring the inclusion of the human rights of migrants in all the regional migration fora. The countries have also significantly contributed to the global migration governance through the adoption of new migration laws and policies.

“Notable practices include the Residence Agreement of the Common Market of the South (MERCOSUR), the free transit instruments created by the Community of Andean Nations (CAN) and, more recently, some agreements on free mobility adopted by the Pacific Alliance,” she said.

Ambassador Thompson also highlighted the important role of the two existing Regional Consultative Processes (RCPs) in the region: The South American Conference on Migration (SACM) and the Regional Conference on Migration (RCM – Puebla Process).  

Alicia Bárcena, Executive Secretary of the ECLAC, highlighted the importance of the regional consultation for Latin America and the Caribbean to provide a consensus view of migration governance, based on the principles of human rights of migrants. Bárcena also urged the Latin American and Caribbean countries to incorporate migration in their development agendas, especially the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Louise Arbour, United Nations Special Representative of the Secretary-General (SRSG) for International Migration, emphasized that migration has an overwhelmingly positive social, economic and cultural impact on countries of origin and destination, and is an empowering experience for millions of migrants and their families. [Watch video]

However, Arbour cautioned that while most of today’s 244 million international migrants move in a regular fashion, many are forced to move, live and work in the shadows, vulnerable to marginalization and abuse. Ensuring safe, orderly and regular migration must address the needs of these most vulnerable persons.

SRSG Arbour also stressed that principled and effective collaboration at the regional level is particularly key in this regard, since the migration policy of one country inevitably influences that of other countries. [Watch video]

She concluded by highlighting the need for leadership in both the political and public spheres, to end the current crisis of solidarity and to facilitate mobility in a safe, orderly and regular fashion.

Juan José Gómez Camacho, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, Permanent Representative of Mexico to the UN and Co-facilitator of the intergovernmental consultations and negotiations on the GCM, highlighted the importance of the regional consultation for Latin America and the Caribbean region as part of the preparation phase. “We need to negotiate a Global Compact based on evidence,” Gómez Camacho emphasized. [Watch video]

The two-day event was organized under six thematic sessions that include human rights of migrants, response to migration drivers including climate change and natural disasters, international cooperation and migration governance as well as migrants’ contribution to sustainable development.

The sessions also included topics such as trafficking in persons and smuggling of migrants, as well as irregular and regular migration and labour mobility.

The next regional consultation will take place in Beirut, Lebanon on 26-27 September and will be hosted by the Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia (ESCWA) with the League of Arab States.
For more information, please contact Juliana Quintero at the IOM Regional Office in Buenos Aires, Tel. + (54) 11 32488134, Email: juquintero@iom.int

 

Language English Posted: Tuesday, September 5, 2017 - 16:00Image: Region-Country: ChileThemes: Global CompactGlobal Compact on MigrationDefault: Multimedia: 

The UN Migration Agency (IOM) Deputy Director General Laura Thompson at the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration in Santiago, Chile. Photo: UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

The Regional Consultation for Latin America and the Caribbean towards the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration (GCM) took place last week (30-31/08) in Santiago, Chile. Photo: UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Southern African Leaders Discuss Inclusive Economic Growth and SDGs

Tue, 09/05/2017 - 10:13

Johannesburg – Sustainable development experts participated in the Responsible Business Forum (RBF) in Johannesburg from 31 August to 1 September to discuss inclusive growth, as well as ways to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in the region. IOM, the UN Migration Agency participated in a workshop focusing on decent work and economic growth.

During the workshop, attendees shared their views on how to encourage entrepreneurship and job creation, two key factors of sustained economic growth. Discussion topics were clustered under partnerships, inclusive growth and interlinkages to exploit synergies and minimize trade-offs between the SDGs and their targets. Jason Theede, IOM Senior Regional Thematic Specialist presented at the panel.

“It is imperative to find ways to facilitate south-south cooperation between governments, but it is equally important to bring private sector and academia into the debate as well,” said Theede.

Theede also mentioned the need to increase efforts for achieving continental and regional economic integration. He drew attention to IOM’s work in Southern Africa, including the guidance provided to States to develop bilateral labour agreements, as well as recommendations to leverage the potential of labour mobility for economic and social development in the region.

The Responsible Business Forum is organized by Global Initiatives with support from partners including Bloomberg, ING, Huawei and other major private sector entities. The forum provides a space for sharing knowledge and best practices and calling on all stakeholders to jointly address global challenges such as economic inequality.

IOM’s tools, such as the Regional Guide to Facilitate South-South Labour Mobility in Southern Africa, along with its support to the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) commission to implement the free movement protocol, provide strategic information for facilitating intra-African labour mobility.

For more information, please contact:
Jason Theede at IOM Regional Office in Pretoria, Email: jtheede@iom.int
Jorge Galindo at IOM HQ in Geneva, Tel: +417179205, Email: jgalindo@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, September 5, 2017 - 15:59Image: Region-Country: South AfricaThemes: Capacity BuildingMigration and DevelopmentDefault: Multimedia: 

The UN Migration Agency participates in a Responsible Business Forum (RBF) workshop in Johannesburg to discuss inclusive growth, as well as ways to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in the region. Photo: UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Vienna Hosts Thematic Session on Migrant Smuggling and Trafficking in Persons towards a Global Compact for Migration

Mon, 09/04/2017 - 05:04

Vienna – IOM Director General William Lacy Swing will address high-level government and UN officials, practitioners, and civil society tomorrow (05/09) at the UN Center in Vienna to call on States to carry out their commitments to combat migrant smuggling and trafficking in persons.

This is the fifth in a series of six sessions covering a range of issues on migration. It provides an opportunity to debate and examine actions taken, as well as gaps in responses to the smuggling of migrants and trafficking in persons. The session also provides a platform for States and agencies to share best practices and launch new initiatives.

Panel discussions will examine topics related to investigating and prosecuting criminal actors, preventing smuggling and trafficking in persons, protecting and providing assistance to victims of trafficking, and national and cross-border coordination and cooperation.

On Tuesday 5 September, IOM will co-host with Polaris the pre-launch event of the Counter Trafficking Data Collaborative (CTDC), a new global repository of harmonized human trafficking data, during a side event co-organized by the United Kingdom with closing remarks by IOM Director General. Today (04/09), IOM will host another side event with UNODC and the Republic of Turkey on supporting new models of cooperation to counter migrant smuggling. More information on both events can be found here.

IOM continues to provide policy and technical expertise to the Offices of the President of the General Assembly and the Special Representative for the Secretary-General (SRSG) on International Migration, who serves as the Secretary-General for the intergovernmental process to adopt a Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration (GCM). A sixth and final thematic session will take place in Geneva in October to be followed by a stocktaking meeting in December and intergovernmental negotiations beginning next year.

For more information please contact:

In Vienna: Joe Lowry, Tel: +43660 3776404, Email: jlowry@iom.int In Geneva: Leonard Doyle, Tel: +41792857123, Email: ldoyle@iom.int or media@iom.int

In New York: Lanna Walsh, Tel: +1929 9201127, Email lwalsh@iom.int

Language English Posted: Monday, September 4, 2017 - 10:57Image: Region-Country: AustriaDefault: Multimedia: 

The 4th GCM Thematic Session focused on the contribution of migrants and diaspora to sustainable development. Photo: UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Working Group on Return and Reintegration Meets to Discuss Migration Management in West Africa

Thu, 08/31/2017 - 20:16

Niamey –The Migration Dialogue for West Africa (MIDWA) Thematic Working Group (TWG) on Return and Reintegration met in Niamey, Niger, from 30-31 August. The regional working group will bring together a network of officials involved in the management of return, readmission and reintegration of migrants in West Africa.

In the past five months, IOM, the UN Migration Agency, has assisted in the voluntary return to West Africa of over 5,000 migrants. The working group recognizes that the scale of this trend requires a coordinated effort to bring together governmental authorities to discuss return policies and mechanisms. 

During the two-day meeting, participants will review and discuss regional initiatives on return and reintegration, such as assisted voluntary return and reintegration (AVRR) programs and migration flow management, lessons learned, best practices and the set-up of a monitoring and evaluation system. The general objective of this TWG will be to analyse the baseline situation of the return, readmission and reintegration processes in ECOWAS Member States. It will also identify specific challenges and/or weaknesses and the concrete steps towards improving coordination among key actors. Finally, it will also work on strengthening the migrant assistance and sustainable reintegration frameworks.

Migration is a paramount factor in the economic growth of West Africa, and the free movement area among ECOWAS Member States is intended to ensure the fulfilment of the Region’s economic potentials. IOM believes that AVRR is beneficial not only to returning migrants, but also communities of origin and transit. By offering a humane and dignified return, together with a tailor-made reintegration package, IOM ensures that return is more sustainable for the returnee and for the receiving community. On top of this, voluntary return can alleviate the pressure posed on transit and destination countries in the management of irregular migration flows.

This working group is organised under the Free Movement and Migration (FMM) in West Africa project, funded by the European Union and ECOWAS and the Protecting Vulnerable Migrants in West and Central Africa, funded by the Government of the United States of America.                             

For more information please contact Frantz Celestin at IOM Nigeria, Tel: +2348141375873, Email: fcelestin@iom.int or Michele Bombassei at IOM Regional Office for West and Central Africa, Tel: +221338696200, Email: mbombassei@iom.int

Language English Posted: Friday, September 1, 2017 - 02:15Image: Region-Country: NigerThemes: Assisted Voluntary Return and ReintegrationDefault: Multimedia: 

Enhancing the governance of labour and skills mobility, improving migrant’s rights protection and facilitating the regional tripartite dialogue on labour migration, are some of the FMM West Africa’s priorities. Photo: FMM West Africa

Photo: FMM West Africa

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UN Migration Agency (IOM) Calls for Restraint, More Aid for Civilians Fleeing Myanmar

Wed, 08/30/2017 - 16:00
Language English

Geneva - IOM, the UN Migration Agency, Director General William Swing today called on all parties in Myanmar to exercise restraint following fresh violence in Rakhine State. He also appealed to the international community to provide more support for civilians fleeing into neighbouring Bangladesh.
 
According to IOM Bangladesh, which coordinates humanitarian assistance to some 200,000 Undocumented Myanmar Nationals living in makeshift settlements in Cox’s Bazar, an estimated 18,500 people have crossed into Bangladesh from Myanmar since latest outbreak of violence on 25 August. Thousands more are still trapped in the no-man’s land between the two countries.
 
Director General Swing joined UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres in his condemnation of the coordinated attacks against Myanmar’s security forces, but called for a proportionate response on the part of the Myanmar authorities that recognizes the need to protect vulnerable civilians.
 
He noted that most of the civilians crossing the border are women, children and the elderly and appealed to Bangladesh, which already hosts an estimated 400,000 Undocumented Myanmar Nationals, to continue to admit desperate people fleeing the violence. 
 
IOM, he said, is at the request of the Bangladesh government, working with the local authorities, UN, NGO and other partners coordinating humanitarian assistance including deliveries of food, water and medical support in Cox’s Bazar.
 
While new arrivals who have entered Bangladesh are able to access these services, he appealed to Bangladesh to either admit people caught on the border or facilitate better access to enable humanitarian aid to reach them.
 
He also called on the Myanmar authorities in Rakhine State to facilitate the work of humanitarian agencies and provide access to vulnerable people in need of assistance to stabilize the situation and reduce the number of people trying to flee the country.
 
Welcoming the recommendations of a report published this week by the Advisory Commission on Rakhine State, he noted that, if implemented, they would also contribute to greater stability. 
 
Limited resources mean that IOM and its humanitarian partners in Cox’s Bazar are now struggling to cope with the influx of new arrivals. IOM is committed to supporting both Myanmar and Bangladesh in addressing the humanitarian needs of people affected by this emerging humanitarian crisis on both sides of the border. But in order to achieve this, more support will be needed from the international community, he added. 
 
For more information please contact Leonard Doyle at IOM's Headquarters in Geneva, Tel: +41792857123, Email: ldoyle@iom.int or media@iom.int

Posted: Wednesday, August 30, 2017 - 21:52Image: Region-Country: BangladeshMyanmarDefault: 
Categories: PBN

UN Migration Agency Statement on International Day of the Disappeared

Wed, 08/30/2017 - 09:44

Geneva - Nearly, 23,000 migrant fatalities worldwide have been recorded by IOM, the UN Migration Agency’s Missing Migrants Project since 2014. Overall, 60,000 deaths on migration routes have been recorded in the last twenty years. However, not all deaths and disappearances are reported and/or recorded. In many regions of the world, migrants’ bodies are never found, and many more may never be identified.

Each nameless death represents a devastated family missing a loved one.

On the International Day of the Disappeared, it is vital that we remember the importance of saving lives also in relation to migrants. In many places around the world, men, women and children go missing during migration, some of whom are in detention without recourse to justice. The rights of migrants, including the right to life, must be protected in order to ensure that migration is safe, orderly, dignified and humane.

Though efforts are being made both to save lives and to improve identification, the thousands of deaths recorded by IOM each year contain only partial information on the individuals that lose their lives. It is likely that many more go missing without a trace.

The Mediterranean crossing, which has claimed the lives of nearly 15,000 migrants since it first made global headlines in October 2013, is just one example of the many deadly migration routes. Hundreds perish every year on the journey from Central America to the United States through Mexico, under the desert sun or are robbed, beaten and raped along the way. Migrants drown in the Bay of Bengal, or on their way from Indonesia to Australia, as they take dangerous sea passages in the hopes of a better life. Migrants die crossing the Sahara Desert into North Africa after being abandoned by smugglers, or drown in the Gulf of Aden as they try to reach the Middle East. Many more disappear and die without a trace.

As we work to save the lives of migrants, we must also consider the families who remain to grieve them. A tragedy even less acknowledged than the terrible loss of life is the fact that many of the migrant dead remain nameless. Each migrant that remains unidentified signifies a family searching for news, hoping that their mother, father, son, daughter, brother, sister, aunt, uncle, cousin is still alive. These families may never be able to truly grieve because they do not know if they should.

Globally, one in seven people are migrants, mostly moving within countries but also across borders. Limiting opportunities for safe and regular migration drives would-be migrants into the hands of smugglers, feeding an unscrupulous trade that threatens the lives of desperate people. Practical protection measures to guarantee safe and regular ways for migrants to reach their destinations are needed. Irregular migrants are human beings in need of protection and assistance. When will we start respecting them?

 

Language English Posted: Wednesday, August 30, 2017 - 15:40Image: Region-Country: SwitzerlandThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesMissing MigrantsDefault: Multimedia: 

“State of Exception/ Estado de Excepción”. Backpacks of migrants found in the Arizona desert, as part of the Undocumented Migration Project led by Jason De León at the University of Michigan.

Categories: PBN

No Migrant Deaths at Sea in Last 20 Days as Mediterranean Arrivals Reach 121,517 for 2017

Tue, 08/29/2017 - 11:38

Geneva – Since 9 August, IOM, the UN Migration Agency, has not received any reports of migrant deaths in the Mediterranean. The total count for Mediterranean Sea fatalities has remained at 2,410 for 20 days. Just 19 deaths have been recorded in the region so far in all of August by IOM, a sharp drop from the 689 recorded in August 2015 and 62 last year. 

Some 121,517 migrants and refugees entered Europe by sea in 2017 through 27 August. This compares with 272,612 arrivals across the region through 27 August 2016. On Monday (28/08), 134 migrants were rescued at sea off Tripoli. So far in 2017, 13,282 migrants have been rescued in Libyan waters.

IOM’s Missing Migrants Project (MMP) reports that there have been 3,514 fatalities in 2017 through 27 August. MMP recorded two migrant deaths on the US-Mexico border (two drownings in Río Bravo) and one train-related death in Central America, as well as one death in Europe: a migrant was found dead in the electrical compartment of a train at Cannes-La Bocca station on Saturday. This is the fourth migrant who has died from electrocution found at Cannes-La Bocca railway station in 2017.

Latest Mediterranean Update infographic: http://migration.iom.int/docs/MMP/170829_Mediterranean_Update.pdf

For latest arrivals and fatalities in the Mediterranean, please visit: http://migration.iom.int/europe

Learn more about the Missing Migrants Project at: http://missingmigrants.iom.int

For more information, please contact:

Flavio Di Giacomo, IOM Italy, Tel: +39 347 089 8996, Email: fdigiacomo@iom.int
Kelly Namia, IOM Greece, Tel: +30 210 991 2174, Email: knamia@iom.int
Julia Black, IOM GMDAC, Tel: +49 30 278 778 27, Email: jblack@iom.int
Christine Petré, IOM Libya, Tel: +216 29 240 448, Email chpetre@iom.int
Ana Dodevska, IOM Spain, Tel: +34 91 445 7116, Email: adodevska@iom.int

 

Language English Posted: Tuesday, August 29, 2017 - 17:23Image: Region-Country: SwitzerlandThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesMissing MigrantsRefugee and Asylum IssuesDefault: Multimedia: 

Italian Coast Guard rescues migrants and refugees bound for Italy. File photo: UN Migration Agency (IOM) / Francesco Malavolta 2014

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UN Migration Agency Increases Support for Migrants Rescued off Libyan Coast

Tue, 08/29/2017 - 11:23

Tripoli – IOM, the UN Migration Agency this week (27-28/08) met with Libyan authorities in Tunis to discuss an initial workplan and the establishment of a coordination body to facilitate rescues at sea. Libyan agencies taking part included the Libyan Coast Guard, the Libyan Red Crescent, the Passport Investigation Department and the General Department for Coast Security and the Border Points.

IOM has provided computer literacy classes and lifesaving equipment to Libyan authorities as part of a wider intervention to strengthen the Government’s humanitarian capacity. Participants have come from the Libyan Coast Guard (LCG), the Directorate for Combatting Illegal Migration (DCIM), as well as the General Department for Coast Security in Azzawya and Zuwara. The classes aim to improve documentation of sea rescue operations, including the registration of migrants at disembarkation points. Thirty participants took part, all involved in rescue operations.

“By better documentation of migrants at the disembarkation points, IOM is hoping to put a registration system in place to help regulate the humanitarian services provided to rescued migrants,” said Maysa Khalil, IOM Libya’s Operations Officer.

IOM also provided information technology equipment, including computers, to the Libyan Coast Guard officers at disembarkation points.

In addition, on 21 August, lifesaving equipment including life buoys, life vests, emergency blankets, torches and protection supplies (gloves, masks, body bags, and disposable suits for retrieving dead bodies) were delivered to the disembarkation points of Abu Setta and Alhamidya. A day later, on 22 August, lifesaving and protection equipment was handed over to the Libyan Coast Guard at the Janzour disembarkation point and Mesfat point in Al-Zawaya and in Zuwara.

“Saving lives remains our highest priority,” emphasized Othman Belbeisi, IOM Libya Chief of Mission. “As it is also a legal obligation, it is important to help the Libyan Coast Guard improve their capacities to save lives and respond in a better way to the needs of the migrants that they rescue.”

IOM recognizes that whilst saving lives remains the top priority, interventions need to be complemented with immediate assistance to rescued migrants following Search and Rescue operations, in particular upon disembarkation on Libyan shores. This includes the provision of humanitarian relief to migrants, as well as regular capacity building training for the Libyan Coast Guard and other stakeholders, particularly in the area of human rights and first aid.

IOM is in the process of rehabilitating three disembarkation points of the planned six. The rehabilitation includes the provision of a shaded area and installation of a water tank, floor cementing, water pumps, lighting systems and cabling networks, as well as toilets and showering facilities, and rehabilitation of the sewage and water piping networks. Migrants can spend anywhere from a few hours to a whole night at these points, following long journeys typically through the Sahara Desert.

IOM’s rescue at sea interventions are funded by the Governments of the Netherlands and Switzerland, and the European Union.

For more information, please contact IOM Libya:
Othman Belbeisi, Tel: +216 29 600 389, Email: obelbeisi@iom.int or Maysa Khalil, Tel: +216 29 600 388, Email: mkhalil@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, August 29, 2017 - 17:14Image: Region-Country: LibyaThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesMissing MigrantsDefault: Multimedia: 

The UN Migration Agency (IOM) provides lifesaving equipment to Libyan authorities as part of a wider intervention to strengthen the Government’s humanitarian capacity. Photo: UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

The UN Migration Agency (IOM) provides lifesaving equipment to Libyan authorities as part of a wider intervention to strengthen the Government’s humanitarian capacity. Photo: UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

Categories: PBN

50 Ethiopian Migrants Stranded in Puntland Return Home with UN Migration Agency Assistance

Tue, 08/29/2017 - 11:13
Language English

Bossaso – On 18 and 27 August, IOM, the UN Migration Agency helped a total of 50 vulnerable Ethiopian migrants return home from Puntland. The two groups were made up of five women, 29 men and 16 children, one of whom was accompanied.

This voluntary return assistance was carried out in collaboration with the Puntland Ministry of Interior, the Bossaso Migrant Response Centre, the Ethiopian Community Association in Bossaso and the Ethiopian Consulate in Garowe.

Migrants transiting through Bossaso, Puntland, face a number of risks including kidnapping by smugglers for ransom, as well as other forms of exploitation and abuse. Migrants are considered a source of income by smuggling networks and impunity for these criminal acts has resulted in the increasing incidences of abuse of migrants in the hands of the smugglers.

Haille, one of the stranded Ethiopians, said that he had stayed in Bossaso for five years with his wife and four children. His wife left for the Middle East a few months ago for work. Since then, it has been difficult to raise the children on his own and so he decided to return home.

Thirteen-year-old Feisal* (*name changed to protect his identity), on the returnees, wept as he spoke to his mother, back home on the phone at IOM’s Migrant Response Centre. “I want to come home,” he sobbed.

Ibrahim left Ethiopia with a group of young men who had planned to make the perilous journey across the Gulf of Aden to the Middle East in search of jobs. Along the way, he fell into the hands of smugglers who abused him. When he got to Bossaso, he escaped to IOM’s Migrant Response Centre where he sought assistance.

Seven of the Ethiopians had fled the ongoing conflict in Yemen and were stranded in Bossaso, with minimal means of survival. The mentioned that they had been living in Yemen for up to eight years.

IOM Somalia worked closely with the Ethiopian Consulate in Puntland to facilitate identity verification and issuance of travel documents.

Once they arrived in Ethiopia, IOM provided the migrants with onward travel assistance to their final destinations, and support to help them reintegrate into their home communities.

This voluntary return operation was made possible through funding provided by the US Department of State Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration (PRM) through the Regional Mixed Migration Program for the Horn of Africa and Yemen. The EU-funded Facility on Sustainable and Dignified Return and Reintegration in Support of the Khartoum Process provided funding for the reintegration assistance.

For more information, please contact Solomon Tagel at IOM Somalia, Tel: +254 712 835 079, Email: tsolomon@iom.int

 

Posted: Tuesday, August 29, 2017 - 17:09Image: Region-Country: SomaliaThemes: Assisted Voluntary Return and ReintegrationDefault: 
Categories: PBN

Young Migrant, Refugee, Turkish Entrepreneurs Bring Business Ideas to Life through UN Migration Agency Support

Tue, 08/29/2017 - 11:08

Izmir – Last weekend (26-27/08), 11 teams of young migrant, refugee and Turkish entrepreneurs presented their innovative business ideas to IOM, the UN Migration Agency, in the hope of securing a grant. Under its entrepreneurship training and grants project, IOM is working to build business skills among young people, helping make their business ideas a reality.

“The entrepreneurship training and grants project give young people from refugee and host communities the opportunity to develop their business ideas, which might have otherwise fallen through the cracks,” said Jamil Awan, IOM Turkey Livelihood Programme Officer. “The project was originally developed to help the Syrian community in Turkey, but was later expanded to include migrant and host community youth. Now, the programme builds social cohesion.”

From 14–26 August, 11 teams comprising 23 participants worked with mentors and trainers as part of the InnoCampus Entrepreneurship Accelerator Training implemented by Innomate, a collaborative non-profit project partner of IOM. The two-week intensive course taught participants business management, finance and marketing strategies, as well as product design, prototyping and branding.

Some of the businesses are social enterprises that aim to provide alternative solutions to problems, such as the “Mental Segment” project. Two young entrepreneurs have developed educational toys to help autistic children learn language and interact with their surroundings.

“Autistic children should learn how to use language before the age of 10,” explained Can, one of the co-founders. “What we offer are unique toys to assist professionals and parents customize education to their autistic child. We came to the training with hopes of getting more visibility to launch our product and we are extremely excited to have been able to reach out to a wider audience thanks to the exposure we have had.”

This is the second phase of IOM’s entrepreneurship project in Turkey. The first was held in Gaziantep from February to May 2017, where three teams with the most viable business plans were selected to receive grants.  These included Joon (modernizing traditional handicrafts created by refugees), Corners (a Syrian interior design team) and Akram (a business designing customized oriental watches). 

With the assistance of IOM’s entrepreneurship programme partnered with Innomate, Joon was part of a four-month training programme to help them develop their business plan. Duygu, Azra and Yashar from Joon have been developing their business plan to help talented refugee artisans bring their handicrafts to the commercial market. They have an innovative approach to handicrafts using laser design, 3D printing and other technologies to adapt traditional handicrafts to modern design. 

“It might be common for NGOs and small business to work with traditional craftsmen. However, the training programme helped us find our niche and to stand out from our competitors. Our business plan will not easily be overtaken by mass production,” said Azra.

“We want to help the disadvantaged and to enable them to bring their passion to the market place. That is our passion,” said Duygu.

Following the end of the programme in Izmir, the entrepreneurship training and grant project will move to Sanliurfa towards the end of the year (October 2017–January 2018) followed by Hatay in early 2018 (February–May 2018).

Entrepreneurship teams that have an innovative business idea and are interested in taking part can contact info@innocampus.org for more information.

IOM’s livelihoods programmes are funded by the US Department of State Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration (PRM).

For more information, please contact Abby Dwommoh at IOM Turkey, Tel: +90 312 454 3048, Email: MediaIOMTurkey@iom.int

 

Language English Posted: Tuesday, August 29, 2017 - 17:02Image: Region-Country: TurkeyThemes: Migration and DevelopmentRefugee and Asylum IssuesDefault: Multimedia: 

Duygu, Azra and Yashar have been developing their business plan to assist talented, but struggling, artisans bring their handicrafts to the commercial market trough Joon, their start-up company. Photo: UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

Categories: PBN

Documentary Shows Risks of Irregular Migration Faced by Latin American Music Group

Tue, 08/29/2017 - 10:42

San José – IOM, The UN Migration Agency has released the documentary, The Fable of the Lion and the Coyote, directed by Costa Rican filmmaker and producer, Miguel Gómez.

The film, divided into five chapters, tells the story of Talawa, a reggae band formed by Alonso Rojas, Gerardo Quirós, Bryan Chavarría, Francisco Barboza and Andrés Solano. The documentary is inspired by the life-threatening journey of the band and their sound engineer Juan Carlos Briceño, through Central America to the United States, without American visas, and motivated by the false expectations of a tour contract.

The documentary exhibits the risks that the group’s members faced during their two-week journey, from malnutrition to the theft of their musical instruments and death threats from a migrant smuggler. Additionally, the members describe how they almost lost their lives while trying to cross the Rio Grande River that divides Mexico and the US. 

IOM, through the Mesoamerica Program, intends this documentary to alert people, especially the younger generation, on the multiple risks of irregular migration, such as sexual or gender violence, extortionate kidnapping, gang recruitment, child labour, labor exploitation, trafficking in persons and even death.

“The Mesoamerican region is one of the most important migratory corridors in the world, in which persons who migrate irregularly are easy prey for networks of migrant smugglers, who take them through dangerous routes and provide them false documents, exposing them to situations that violate their human rights,” said Alexandra Bonnie, IOM Regional Coordinator of the Mesoamerica Program.

“In the first seven months of 2017, IOM registered the deaths of more than 230 migrants along the border between Mexico and the United States. We hope that the testimony of the young members of this group will contribute to the understanding of the risks associated with irregular migration that anyone can come up against,” she added.

Costa Rican filmmaker Miguel Gómez, director of Italia 90 and Maikol Jordan presented the story as a documentary series of five chapters of three to five minutes each. The first chapter can be seen here.

The United Nations (UN) System supported the dissemination of the documentary through its Facebook account, and by integrating it into the TOGETHER campaign, which promotes the respect, security, and dignity of refugees and migrants.

InformArte en Movimiento is another awareness-raising campaign by IOM in Mesoamerica that seeks to prevent the risks of irregular migration, with a special focus on children and adolescents.

This documentary was possible thanks to the support of the IOM Mesoamerica Program, financed by the Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration of the US Department of State. This programme aims to strengthen the capacities of government and civil society organizations to improve the protection and assistance of migrant people in situations of vulnerability.

For more information, please contact Patricia Ugalde at IOM Costa Rica, Tel. +506 22125300, Email: pugalde@iom.int             

 

Language English Posted: Tuesday, August 29, 2017 - 16:33Image: Region-Country: Costa RicaThemes: Human SmugglingRefugee and Asylum IssuesDefault: Multimedia: 

From the documentary The Fable of the Lion and the Coyote.

From the documentary The Fable of the Lion and the Coyote.

From the documentary The Fable of the Lion and the Coyote.

Categories: PBN

UN Migration Agency Launches Study to Help Scale up Formal Remittances to Ethiopia

Tue, 08/29/2017 - 10:32

Addis Ababa – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, last week (24/08) launched Scaling up Formal Remittances to Ethiopia, a research study that explores increasing the volume and value of formal remittances to Ethiopia.

“An estimated USD 465 billion in remittances is expected to flow into developing countries in 2017 alone,” said Maureen Achieng, IOM Ethiopia Chief of Mission, at the launch of the report.

“Remittances contribute to more than 5 per cent of Ethiopia’s GDP and have increased from USD 141 million in 2003 to USD 4 billion in 2015/16 fiscal year,” said Demeke Atnafu, Director General for Diaspora Engagement Affairs Directorate General at the Ethiopian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, also at the launch.

Despite the steady increase in remittances to Ethiopia, Atnafu acknowledged that a significant amount of remittances is sent through informal channels. According to the study, as much as 78 per cent of the money sent may be going through informal channels in some corridors.

Leon Isaacs, international remittance expert, consultant and author of the report, noted that the problem with informal flows is that, “they pose a risk to the consumer, reduce opportunities to encourage targeted investment, lead to a loss of foreign exchange for the Government, and undermine Anti-Money Laundering (AML) as well as Combatting the Financing of Terrorism (CFT) efforts.”

The launch provided an opportunity for stakeholders – banks, money transfer companies, NGOs, diaspora associations, Government officials and policymakers – to discuss the study’s recommendations to scale up formal remittances to Ethiopia. Key recommendations discussed at the launch include the need to:

  • introduce a multi-stakeholder working group focused on remittances and diaspora investment
  • increase formal data collection on remittances and diaspora investment
  • improve migrants’ access to formal remittance channels by increasing access to legal identification
  • promote access to formal and legal migration routes
  • support remittance pay-out locations in rural areas
  • introduce technological solutions such as mobile payments
  • and, in general, improve financial education in Ethiopia.

Scaling up Formal Remittances to Ethiopia was produced under the ACP-EU Migration Action, an initiative of the African Caribbean Pacific States (ACP) Secretariat, funded by the European Union and implemented by IOM.

For more information, please contact:
Alemayehu Seifeselassie at IOM Ethiopia, Tel: +251 91 163 9082, Email: salemayehu@iom.int or Noni Munge at RO Nairobi, Tel: +254 20 4221 368, Email: nmunge@iom.int  

 

Language English Posted: Tuesday, August 29, 2017 - 16:24Image: Region-Country: EthiopiaThemes: Migration ResearchMigration and DevelopmentDefault: Multimedia: 

The UN Migration Agency launches the research study Scaling up Formal Remittances to Ethiopia which explores the volume and value of formal remittances to Ethiopia. Photo: UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

The UN Migration Agency launches the research study Scaling up Formal Remittances to Ethiopia which explores the volume and value of formal remittances to Ethiopia. Photo: UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

Categories: PBN

Displaced Papua New Guinea Communities Receive Safe Drinking Water from UN Migration Agency

Tue, 08/29/2017 - 10:23

Port Moresby – Oro Province in Papua New Guinea is prone to natural disasters, including volcanic eruptions, cyclones and flooding, which have led to displacement, destruction of property and even death. The disasters have increased the vulnerability of communities, limiting their access to essential services, including safe drinking water.

This month, the UN Migration Agency (IOM), with support from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), responded by launching water supply projects in ten Oro wards impacted by Cyclone Guba nearly a decade ago and hit by subsequent natural disasters, including floods.

IOM is responding by establishing rainwater harvesting facilities and cisterns, which will provide safe drinking water for at least 1,900 households in Tabara, Katuna, Bakubari, Gona, Killerton, Buna, Ononda, Eroro, Ahora Beuru and Horau-Huhuru.

“Identified as such during a community-based disaster risk management process organized by IOM, safe drinking water is the top priority among our projects, and it is essential for reducing health risks and preventing disease outbreaks,” said Lance Bonneau, IOM Papua New Guinea Chief of Mission.

In the past, women and girls would usually carry drinking water from rivers and unprotected wells. “My family used to get our water from shallow wells. But it was always brackish. We can now get clean (rain) water from the tanks supplied by IOM,” said a Katuna resident.

Community members worked with IOM engineers to set up the tanks. “We committed ourselves to be part of what IOM is doing in our community. We collected wood, sand and stones for the construction of our water points,” said a villager from Bakubari.

“It is important that beneficiary communities take ownership of disaster risk management projects and community development planning. Disasters are indiscriminate in both timing and scale but, whatever or whenever the event, the community will have to provide the frontline response to minimize the impact and save lives,” said Bonneau.

The water supply system was commissioned in the Oro coastal town of Killerton at a ceremony attended by representatives of the Provincial Disaster Office, district and local government authorities and media. Steven Awoda, on behalf of the Government, thanked IOM and members of the community for their commitment to the project.

For more information, please contact Peter Murorera at IOM Port Moresby, Tel: +675 7940 1090, Email: pmurorera@iom.int

 

Language English Posted: Tuesday, August 29, 2017 - 16:10Image: Region-Country: Papua New GuineaThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesMigration and Climate ChangeMigration and EnvironmentDefault: Multimedia: 

Oro villagers gather around new water tanks supplied by the project. Photo: UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

Categories: PBN

Displaced Papua New Guinea Communities Receive Safe Drinking Water from UN Migration Agency

Tue, 08/29/2017 - 10:23

Port Moresby – Oro Province in Papua New Guinea is prone to natural disasters, including volcanic eruptions, cyclones and flooding, which have led to displacement, destruction of property and even death. The disasters have increased the vulnerability of communities, limiting their access to essential services, including safe drinking water.

This month, the UN Migration Agency (IOM), with support from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), responded by launching water supply projects in ten Oro wards impacted by Cyclone Guba nearly a decade ago and hit by subsequent natural disasters, including floods.

IOM is responding by establishing rainwater harvesting facilities and cisterns, which will provide safe drinking water for at least 1,900 households in Tabara, Katuna, Bakubari, Gona, Killerton, Buna, Ononda, Eroro, Ahora Beuru and Horau-Huhuru.

“Identified as such during a community-based disaster risk management process organized by IOM, safe drinking water is the top priority among our projects, and it is essential for reducing health risks and preventing disease outbreaks,” said Lance Bonneau, IOM Papua New Guinea Chief of Mission.

In the past, women and girls would usually carry drinking water from rivers and unprotected wells. “My family used to get our water from shallow wells. But it was always brackish. We can now get clean (rain) water from the tanks supplied by IOM,” said a Katuna resident.

Community members worked with IOM engineers to set up the tanks. “We committed ourselves to be part of what IOM is doing in our community. We collected wood, sand and stones for the construction of our water points,” said a villager from Bakubari.

“It is important that beneficiary communities take ownership of disaster risk management projects and community development planning. Disasters are indiscriminate in both timing and scale but, whatever or whenever the event, the community will have to provide the frontline response to minimize the impact and save lives,” said Bonneau.

The water supply system was commissioned in the Oro coastal town of Killerton at a ceremony attended by representatives of the Provincial Disaster Office, district and local government authorities and media. Steven Awoda, on behalf of the Government, thanked IOM and members of the community for their commitment to the project.

For more information, please contact Peter Murorera at IOM Port Moresby, Tel: +675 7940 1090, Email: pmurorera@iom.int

 

Language English Posted: Tuesday, August 29, 2017 - 16:10Image: Region-Country: Papua New GuineaThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesMigration and Climate ChangeMigration and EnvironmentDefault: Multimedia: 

Oro villagers gather around new water tanks supplied by the project. Photo: UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

Categories: PBN

Director General Visit Boosts UN Migration Agency, China Cooperation

Fri, 08/25/2017 - 11:37

Beijing – Ambassador William Lacy Swing, IOM Director General, this week visited China at the invitation of the Government of China. The five-day visit on 20–24 August marked the one-year anniversary of China’s membership of IOM, the UN Migration Agency. 

During the visit, DG Swing met with the State Counsellor, Yang Jiechi, to discuss ways to further enhance bilateral relations between IOM and China. Topics included the migration implications of initiatives including the One Belt and One Road (OBOR) Initiative and the Global Compact for Migration (GCM).

He also held meetings with the Ministries of Foreign Affairs, Public Security, Civil Affairs, Commerce, and the National Health and Family Planning Commission. During the visit, he also signed a new Country Agreement and witnessed the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding on the health and development of migrant populations.

At a meeting with Hu Chenjie, Alibaba Group Vice President, he discussed private sector partnerships and possible future cooperation with the IT giant, especially regarding facilitating international travel for Chinese nationals.  

Yesterday (24/8), DG Swing joined Minister Li Bin at the opening of the 1st International Forum on New Urbanization, Health and Social Integration organized by China’s National Health and Family Planning Commission in cooperation with IOM. WHO Director General Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus participated by video link.

China hosts the largest migrant population in the world and its rapid urbanization has had a profound and lasting impact on local and national public health services.

Speaking at the Forum, DG Swing highlighted the importance of partnerships and coordination in addressing challenges relating to the health and well-being of migrants. “We need to work together to better understand the health aspects of mobility, to develop complementarities and to strengthen multi-sectoral collaboration,” he said. “Health is an essential component of sustainable development and, like migration itself, is not a problem to be solved but an opportunity to be managed.”

For more information, please contact Pär Liljert at IOM China, Tel. +86.13466385492, Email: pliljert@iom.int

 

Language English Posted: Friday, August 25, 2017 - 17:34Image: Region-Country: ChinaThemes: IOMDefault: Multimedia: 

UN Migration Agency (IOM) Director General William Lacy Swing meets with China State Counsellor Yang Jiechi. Photo: UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

Categories: PBN

Food Insecurity Second Most-Cited Cause of Migration from Central to North America

Fri, 08/25/2017 - 11:26

Washington, D.C. – A new study supported by IOM, the UN Migration Agency, confirms a clear link between food insecurity and migration in the Central American countries of El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras.

The study found that reduced agricultural productivity and loss of crops are the second most-cited causes of migration for populations living in the Dry Corridor of El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras. Poverty and unemployment were the first most cited causes. This research was conducted by the World Food Programme (WFP) in partnership with IOM, the Organization of American States (OAS), the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), and the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).

 Launched publicly by David Beasly, WFP Executive Director, at the Organization of American States in Washington, D.C., on 23 August, the report builds on the results and recommendations of the 2015 exploratory study, Hunger without Borders. Ministers from Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala participated in the launch event.  

“Without human rights, there is no social inclusion nor democracy nor societies in peace,” said Nestor Mendez, OAS Assistant Secretary General, at the opening of the event. “When millions of our fellow citizens are hungry, when the benefits of development do not reach everyone, when wealth is only shared by some, we cannot ensure a democratic path for our region,” said Mendez.

This new study confirms that adverse climatic conditions, including El Niño, in the Dry Corridor affect food security by curbing agricultural productivity in commercial and subsistence farming, as well as agricultural work opportunities.

Nearly half (47 per cent) of the families interviewed for this study were food insecure. The report notes that these levels of food insecurity have not been previously seen in the region.

As a result of the drought and the effects of El Niño, the study reports a significant increase in irregular migration to the United States since 2014.

In fact, the flow of emigrants from the three Central American nations has increased substantially since 2010, while migration from Mexico to the US has diminished in recent years. Although the majority of those who migrate are young men (79 per cent are between the ages of 20 and 29), the report also notes an increasing number of unaccompanied children fleeing the Dry Corridor for the United States.

“Migration is an adaptive strategy to adverse climatic conditions and food insecurity, and we expect it to continue,” said Luca Dall’Oglio, IOM Washington Chief of Mission, during the launch.

“Extreme environmental events such as cyclones, hurricanes, tsunamis and tornadoes tend to result in the displacement of people and thus capture the media headlines, but gradual and slow-onset changes in the environment may have a much greater impact on the permanent movement of people in the future,” added Dall’Oglio.

The report shows the need to invest in long-term programmes to avert the migration of people in the Dry Corridor. It also highlights the need to reduce the dangers faced by migrants on their trip to the north and the impact on families left behind after the departure of the strongest members of the family in search of better opportunities.

Download the report here: Food Security and Emigration: Why people flee and the impact on family members left behind in El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras  

For more information, please contact Hajer Naili at IOM Washington, Tel: +1 202 568 3757, Email: hnaili@iom.int

Language English Posted: Friday, August 25, 2017 - 17:20Image: Region-Country: United States of AmericaThemes: Migration ResearchMigration and EnvironmentDefault: Multimedia: 

Migrants who are in transit at the shelter and waiting to continue their journey north to the Mexico-US border, stand to say a blessing before eating their meal of egg and rice soup with tortillas. File photo: Keith Dannemiller/UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2014

Categories: PBN

Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals Reach 120,975 in 2017

Fri, 08/25/2017 - 11:20

Geneva – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, reports that 120,975 migrants and refugees entered Europe by sea in 2017 through 23 August. This compares with 271,951 arrivals across the region through 23 August 2016.

IOM Libya reports that 102 migrants (95 men and 7 women) were rescued at sea off Sabratha on 21 August by the Libyan Coast Guard. So far in 2017, 13,148 migrants been rescued in Libyan waters.

No new deaths have been recorded by IOM’s Missing Migrants Project in the Mediterranean Sea since Monday.  Elsewhere in the world, two migrant deaths in Mexico and three migrant deaths on the US-side of the US-Mexico border were recorded.

Also, last Sunday, 20 August, a shipwreck occurred off the coast of Comoros with migrants trying to reach Mayotte, a French island. One migrant is confirmed dead from this incident, while 10 remain missing (including five women and three children). Six people survived the shipwreck.

Latest Mediterranean Update: Infographic: http://migration.iom.int/docs/MMP/170825_Mediterranean_Update.pdf

For latest arrivals and fatalities in the Mediterranean, please visit: http://migration.iom.int/europe

Learn more about the Missing Migrants Project at: http://missingmigrants.iom.int

For more information, please contact:

Joel Millman at IOM HQ, Tel: +41 79 103 8720, Email: jmillman@iom.int
Flavio Di Giacomo, IOM Italy, Tel: +39 347 089 8996, Email: fdigiacomo@iom.int
Kelly Namia, IOM Greece, Tel: +30 210 991 2174, Email: knamia@iom.int
Julia Black, IOM GMDAC, Tel: +49 30 278 778 27, Email: jblack@iom.int
Christine Petré, IOM Libya, Tel: +216 29 240 448, Email cpetre@iom.int
Ana Dodevska, IOM Spain, Tel: +34 91 445 7116, Email: adodevska@iom.int

 

Language English Posted: Friday, August 25, 2017 - 16:56Image: Region-Country: SwitzerlandThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesMissing MigrantsDefault: Multimedia: 

IOM Field officer at work in Lampedusa. File photo: Alessia Capasso / UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2011

Categories: PBN

UN Migration Agency Trains Sudanese Officials to Increase Border Security, Enhance Protection of Vulnerable Migrants

Fri, 08/25/2017 - 10:55

Moshi – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, held a three-day training course for Sudanese officials at the African Capacity Building Centre (ACBC) in Tanzania. Running from 22 to 24 August, the training focused on the Migration Information and Data Analysis System (MIDAS), IOM’s border management information system developed in 2009. MIDAS is a high-quality, user-friendly and fully customizable solution for States in need of a cost-effective and comprehensive border system. Currently operational in 19 countries, MIDAS has been designed to be fully compliant with international standards.

The 15 trainees came from Immigration and Police, including senior ICT Experts. As part of the training, participants visited Julius Nyerere International Airport, the National Identification Authority (NIDA) Operation Facility in Kibaha, near Dar es Salaam and the Holili Taveta One Stop Border Post (OSBP) on the Tanzanian-Kenyan land border.

The government officials also had the chance to see the newly upgraded Forensic Document Examination Laboratory of the Tanzanian Regional Immigration Training Academy (TRITA) where IOM’s ACBC is located.

The main objective of the training was to further enhance the capacity of Sudanese border and immigration officials to take well-informed decisions for upgrading their current border management information systems.

The training also provided an opportunity for discussions between IOM experts and delegates on new technologies and their potential use – but also the associated risks – in the border management field. The specificities of new biometric applications such as facial matching system software were discussed. The challenge was to explore how such new technology can help address issues related to identity fraud, human trafficking or migrant smuggling, organized crime, or other illicit activities, while also respecting privacy and other concerns.

“This is the first in-house training that IOM ACBC has delivered in Arabic. This, in my view, is a very positive and practical example of IOM’s firm commitment to upgrade its own capacities to best meet the needs and expressed demands of African Member States in the domain of migration and border management. Providing technical training in the appropriate language is a key element for successful outcomes,” stated Dr. Qasim Sufi, IOM Tanzania Chief of Mission, at the training’s closing ceremony.

To underline Tanzania’s support of IOM’s ACBC training activities, the closing event was attended by Ambassador Celestine Mushy, the Director of Multilateral Cooperation in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and East African Cooperation and Hanelore Morgan Manyanga, Commissioner for the Legal Department of Immigration of the Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) and current Officer In Charge for the Commissioner General of Immigration of the MHA.

The training was funded through the European Union (EU) Trust Fund project, Better Migration Management (BMM), a regional development cooperation programme to enhance cooperation and to adopt common approaches to improve migration management. The overall objective of the BMM programme is to improve migration management in East and Horn of Africa, by addressing human trafficking and migrant smuggling.

Migrants from East and Horn of Africa continue to attempt to move irregularly to Europe, thereby experiencing great suffering and, far too often, even death along extremely dangerous smuggling and trafficking routes through desserts, mountainous areas, and across the sea. In this broader context, targeted trainings for border officials in Africa are an important tool aimed at contributing to the better protection of vulnerable migrants, the empowerment of regular and safe migration, and increased border security for all. 

For more information, please contact Letizia Tirone at IOM Sudan, Tel: +249 922406645, Email: ltirone@iom.int or Nelson Goncalves at IOM Tanzania, Tel: +255 688700090, Email: ngoncalves@iom.int 

For more information on MIDAS, please contact Jason Clarke at IOM HQ in Geneva, Tel: +41 22 7179 334, Email: jclarke@iom.int

 

Language English Posted: Friday, August 25, 2017 - 16:27Image: Region-Country: United Republic of TanzaniaThemes: Capacity BuildingIntegrated Border ManagementDefault: Multimedia: 

The UN Migration Agency (IOM) hands out certificates of completion to participants of the Migration Information and Data Analysis System (MIDAS) training in Tanzania. Photo: UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

UN Migration Agency (IOM) staff deliver training on the Migration Information and Data Analysis System (MIDAS), IOM’s border management information system. Photo: UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

Participants of the Migration Information and Data Analysis System (MIDAS) training in Tanzania. Photo: UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

Categories: PBN

UN Migration Agency Reinforces Fight against Human Trafficking in Burkina Faso

Fri, 08/25/2017 - 10:27
Language English

Ouagadougou – On Friday (18/08) and Monday (21/08) IOM, the UN Migration Agency, organized two workshops to build the capacities of local practitioners involved in the fight against human trafficking. Governmental and non-governmental representatives attended the workshops.

The trainings aimed to strengthen the capacities of all stakeholders to collect data, and to facilitate communication between all actors involved. Over 50 government and non-government attendees were trained during these two sessions. The training, facilitated by Nanebor Consult, a research entity in Burkina Faso, consisted of a presentation on the issues and challenges associated with the collection of data on human trafficking; related practices; the data collection system; and the proposed form for data collection and storage.

"The training has benefitted us because we have learned a lot”, said Ibrahim Traoré, one of the participants, at the end of the training. “Before we were obliged to write the data on paper and send them to Bobo-Dioulasso or Ouagadougou. Now with the collection tool and the phone, we can easily send the data directly.”

Yvette Dembele, Secretary of State for Social Affairs, Disability and Inclusion, representing the Minister for Women, National Solidarity and the Family, expressed her satisfaction and thanked IOM for this initiative. She encouraged participants to use this new knowledge to protect the people in the country from human trafficking.

Burkina Faso has been demoted to tier 2 of the United States’ watch list (classifying countries according to their level of elimination of human trafficking) for several reasons including the shortage of available statistical data. It is very difficult to have comprehensive, harmonized and shared data on the practice of human trafficking in the country, which the new tool aims to resolve.

According to IOM Burkina Faso’s Simon Pierre Tarama, these trainings are the result of a study commissioned by IOM, which resulted in the creation of a harmonized data collection tool for smartphones. The information collected will be automatically transmitted by mobile phones to supply a centralized database at national level via software.

The trainings are part of the project Fight Against Human Trafficking in Burkina Faso through the Strengthening of the National Framework and Capacities in the Identification of Victims and the Improvement of Data Collection, funded by the US Department of State.

The two-year project supports the Government of Burkina Faso in strengthening the national anti-trafficking management framework. It also aims to bring together key national structures working in the fight against trafficking in persons to better coordinate actions, strengthen the system of data collection and information sharing among stakeholders and facilitate investigations and prosecution of victims of trafficking in the country.

For more information, please contact Simon Pierre Tarama at IOM Burkina Faso, Tel: +226 67 39 65 13; Email: starama@iom.int

            

Posted: Friday, August 25, 2017 - 16:11Image: Region-Country: Burkina FasoThemes: Capacity BuildingCounter-TraffickingHuman SmugglingDefault: 
Categories: PBN

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