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Updated: 2 hours 23 min ago

Yemen: Hudaydah Displaced Population Now an Estimated 336,846

Fri, 08/17/2018 - 10:36

Yemen – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, estimates Hudaydah’s displaced population has now reached an estimated 336,846 men, women and children due to a flare up in violence that began two months ago.

The world’s worst humanitarian crisis deteriorated further in June 2018 when a frontal assault on Hudaydah, Yemen’s main port city, led to the displacement of more than half of the city’s 600,000 population, according to IOM’s latest surveys of the population.

Between 29 July and 7 August, IOM’s Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) identified an increase of 1,393 displaced households (estimated 6,636 individuals) forced to leave their places of usual residence in Hudaydah. This brings the total number of households to 57,534 forced to leave their homes since the escalation of conflict in early June.

The largest increases were identified within Amanat Al Asimah, Taizz and Ibb Governorates.  Some 763 households (estimated 4,578 individuals) in Amanat Al Asimah were displaced to Ma’ain, Old City, Shu’aub, Bani Al Harith, Az’zal, Ath’thaorah, At Tahrir and Assafiyah districts. Families reported reaching Amant Al Asimah, using an access road through Manakhah.

Some 232 households (estimated 1,392 individuals) in Taizz were displaced to Al Mudhaffar, Dimnat Khadir, Al Qahirah, Salh and Hayfan district. An additional 111 households (estimated 666 individuals) in Ibb were displaced to Far Al Udayn, As Sabrah, Al Dhihar, Al Mashannah, Jiblah, Hazm Al Udayn and As Sayyani district.

More recent reports from the past week, which were not included in IOM’s latest report, indicate over 1,000 households having been displaced in Zabid between 8 July and 15 July, the majority within Zabid district and some households moving to Bayt Al Faqiah. Most of the displaced population has been living on savings, selling property, gold, cars, and other assets they had for almost two years now, since the collapse of the government and infrastructure in Yemen.

Partners estimate that across Yemen more than 20 million people need humanitarian assistance.

Since 13 June, IOM has provided 4,680 medical consultations, antenatal care to 337 pregnant women, reproductive health consultations to 531 individuals and psychosocial support to 500 people, as well as conducting health promotion activities that have reached over 1,600 people. IOM distributed food rations, basic hygiene items and other essentials to over 3,300 displaced people. Shelter materials and other essential aid were provided to 1,400 families, as well as 20,850 hot meals in various areas of displacement. To ensure their safety and access to humanitarian services, IOM has helped transport over 1,000 displaced people to various locations. 

IOM DTM uses the Emergency Tracking Tool to compile daily information from various partners including local and international NGOs, and local and national authorities. While IOM field teams verify information provided by partners where it has direct access, in other locations, IOM relies on checks completed by field partners to confirm or provide alternative figures.
 
For more information, please contact:
Saba Malme at IOM Yemen, Tel: + 967 736 800 329; Email: smalme@iom.int
 Ali Eren Güven at IOM HQ, Tel: +41 22 217 9891; Email: aguven@iom.int

Language English Posted: Friday, August 17, 2018 - 14:55Image: Region-Country: YemenThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesInternally Displaced PersonsDefault: Multimedia: 

IOM establishes kitchens in four schools in Hudaydah where displaced people are currently residing. Through these kitchens and other facilities, over 20,400 hot meals have been served since the current crisis began. Photo: IOM 2018

IOM distributes non-food items including shelter kits to internally displaced persons from Hudaydah who are currently in Bait Al Fageeh. Photo: IOM

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

UN Agencies, Government Distribute LPG Stoves to Rohingya Refugees, Bangladeshi Villagers to Save Remaining Forests

Fri, 08/17/2018 - 09:08

Cox’s Bazar – A major environmental project to provide around 250,000 families with liquid petroleum gas (LPG) stoves and gas cylinders has been launched by UN agencies and the government in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, to help prevent further deforestation linked to the Rohingya refugee crisis. 

At the official launch of phase one of the project yesterday (16/08), over 300 local villagers identified by local officials as extremely vulnerable and in need of support were the first to receive stove and gas sets. Thousands more will be distributed to Rohingya refugees and other host community families over the coming months. 

The alternative fuel initiative is being organized by the UN Migration Agency (IOM), UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), World Food Programme (WFP) and UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR), working closely with Bangladesh’s Ministry of Disaster Management and Relief (MODMR) and Commissioner for Refugee Repatriation and Relief (RRRC). 

The launch was attended by senior Bangladeshi officials including Commissioner for Refugee Repatriation and Relief Mohammad Abul Kalam, Divisional Commissioner for Chittagong Mohammad Abdul Mannan, and Deputy Commissioner for Cox’s Bazar Mohammad Kamal Hossain.  

Cox’s Bazar was home to significant areas of protected forest and an important wildlife habitat. But the arrival of over 700,000 Rohingya refugees fleeing violence in Myanmar over the past year led to massive deforestation as desperate families cut down trees and cleared land to make space for makeshift shelters. 

With refugees and many local villagers almost entirely reliant on firewood for cooking, that damage has continued, and forest is being cleared at a rate of 700 metric tonnes - the equivalent of around four football fields of trees – each day. If cutting continues at the current rate, the area’s forest will be completely destroyed by the end of 2019, according to UN estimates. 

“This is a vitally important project which will not only help mitigate and redress deforestation and environmental damage but will also play an important role in improving health and safety in the local and refugee communities,” said Sanjukta Sahany, head of IOM’s transition and recovery team in Cox’s Bazar. 

Smoke from firewood being burned in homes and shelters without proper ventilation is a significant cause of health problems, particularly among women and young children, who spend much of their time indoors. 

The reliance on firewood has also raised protection concerns, with most wood collection being carried out by children, who have had to venture further from homes to find wood, as the forest has been cut back. Competition for this increasingly rare resource is also a growing source of conflict between the refugees and local communities.  

“By curbing the extraction of firewood from the remaining forests, it allows us to protect, re-enter and replant,” explained Peter Agnew, FAO’s emergency response coordinator in Cox’s Bazar. He noted that the alternative fuel project is part of the wider SAFE Plus project, which is designed to improve economic livelihoods for host communities, and in turn overall food security, as well as the resilience of the refugees, by empowering them through skills development.  

“Over the next three years, several thousand people from the local and refugee communities will have livelihood opportunities working on forest rehabilitation with the SAFE Plus project, in coordination with the forestry department,” he said. 

For more information please contact Fiona MacGregor at IOM Cox's Bazar, Tel. +8801733335221, Email: fmacgregor@iom.int 

Language English Posted: Friday, August 17, 2018 - 15:05Image: Region-Country: BangladeshThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesRohingya CrisisDefault: Multimedia: 

UN agencies and Bangladesh government launch alternative fuel project in Cox’s Bazar to help reduce deforestation linked to Rohingya crisis. Photos: Patrick Shepherd FAO/IOM

UN agencies and the Bangladesh government have launched an alternative fuel project to supply LPG stoves and gas to villagers and refugees in Cox’s Bazar to help reduce deforestation linked to the Rohingya crisis. Photos: Patrick Shepherd FAO/IOM

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals Reach 63,142 in 2018; Deaths Reach 1,527

Fri, 08/17/2018 - 09:08

Geneva – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, reports that 63,142 migrants and refugees entered Europe by sea in 2018 through 16 August, with 26,350 to Spain, the leading destination this year. This compares with 119,137 arrivals across the region through the same period last year, and 266,423 at this point in 2016. 

Spain, with 42 per cent of all arrivals through the year, continues to receive seaborne migrants in July at a volume more than three times that of Greece and almost five times that of Italy. Italy’s arrivals through mid-July are the lowest recorded at this point of a normally busy summer sailing season in almost five years (see chart below). 

IOM Rome reported this week that Italy’s Ministry of the Interior released data on nationalities of migrants coming irregularly from Africa in 2018. Tunisians continue to comprise this year’s largest group – although just over 300 arrived in July, after more than 3,000 entered Italy between January and June. Eritrea, in second place, also added about 300 new arrivals in July, after some 2,500 arrived during 2018’s first six months. Sudan added fewer than 100 arrivals in July, after 1,488 through June.  

Sender countries with larger increases in July include Iraq – whose totals jumped from 605 through June to 964 at the end of July – and Pakistan, which recorded 720 arrivals through June this year, and an additional 258 in July. Mali recorded 875 arrivals in June, and the same total in July – for a net increase of zero. Côte d’Ivoire, with 1,026 arrivals through June, added just 14 new arrivals in July. Guinea, with 808 arrivals through June, added just one additional arrival in July. Nigeria, with 1,248 arrivals through July added just 19 to its January-June totals (see charts below).  

“We have noted for several months now the steep decline in departures from Libya by Sub-Saharan Africans, particularly from sender nations like Guinea, Mali and Côte d’Ivoire,” said Joel Millman, an IOM spokesman in Geneva. “These latest figures indicate the trend is becoming more pronounced. Even Nigerians seem to be cutting back their migration through Libya.”  

IOM’s Christine Petré reported that on 9 August, IOM assisted 167 stranded migrants to return home on one chartered flight to the Côte d’Ivoire and three commercial flights to Cameroon, Djibouti and Burkina Faso. A few days later, on 13 August, 16 stranded migrants were able to go home to Egypt, six to Ethiopia and one to Sudan, via three commercial flights.  

As of 13 August, IOM Libya has assisted 17,542 returnees since the scale-up phase started 28 November 2017. A total of 30,674 migrants have returned home from Libya with IOM’s assistance since 1 January 2017.   

IOM’s Missing Migrants Project (MMP) reported Thursday reported 1,527 migrants have lost their lives crossing the Mediterranean Sea in 2018, or almost seven per day. Over two thirds of those deaths have occurred on the Central Mediterranean route between Libya and Italy, even though fewer than a third of all migrant departures have been along that route. 

On the Western Mediterranean route, Missing Migrants Project recorded the deaths of three people in August. On 7 August, the remains of a woman from Sub-Saharan Africa were retrieved floating near Cape Trafalgar in Cádiz, Spain. On 10 August, the Spanish rescue services saved 66 people and recovered one body from a sinking boat off the coast of Cabo de Gata, Almería. Survivors reported that one more person went missing.   

It is worth noting that 2018 deaths of migrants on this Western Mediterranean route – 311 through 15 August – have barely increased despite this summer’s arrivals surge.  

Through the end of May, with 8,150 migrants arriving via this route, 238 migrants perished in the Western Mediterranean – or more than all recorded fatalities in 2017, where there were 224 drownings. Yet since 1 June, just 73 migrants have been reported lost, despite a total of 18,200 arriving during those two and a half months (see chart below).  

IOM Spain’s Ana Dodevska reported that total arrivals at sea in 2018 have reached 26,350 men, women and children who have been rescued in Western Mediterranean waters through 15 August. She said 1,249 were rescued over the past 72 hours. 

Over the year’s first five months, a total of 8,150 men, women and children were rescued in Spanish waters after leaving Africa – an average of 54 per day. In the 76 days since May 31, a total of 18,200 have arrived – or just under 240 migrants per day. The months of May-August this year have seen a total of 21,723 irregular migrants arriving by sea, the busiest four-month period for Spain since IOM began tallying arrival statistics.  

And there are still two weeks remaining in the month of August (see chart below). 

On Thursday, IOM Athens’ Christine Nikolaidou reported no arrivals on Monday this week but that over 48 hours on 14-15 August, Hellenic Coast Guard (HCG) units handled at least five incidents requiring search and rescue operations off the islands of Samos and Lesvos. The HCG rescued a total 208 migrants and transferred them to safety. Additional arrivals to Megisti and Lesvos bring the total number of arrivals between Sunday and Wednesday to 305 men, women and children. 

Total arrivals by sea to Greece through 15 August are 17,139 (see chart below). 

IOM’s Marta Sanchez reported Thursday IOM’s Missing Migrants Project has documented the deaths worldwide of 2,390 people during migration to international destinations in 2018.  

Most recently, in Morocco, two men from Senegal and Guinea died when they fell from the bus in which they were being transported to the south of the country on 12 August.  On 10 August, in West Africa, seven migrants lost their lives off the coast of Bakau, Gambia. The remains of three Senegalese men and one Gambian man were recovered during the rescue operation, while the remains of two more Senegalese migrants were found on 12 August. One person remains missing. 

According to survivors’ testimonies, the deceased jumped off the boat in which they were attempting to reach Spain after the vessel caught fire. Although 79 others were saved in a rescue effort by the Gambia Immigration Department, these deaths come as a reminder of how deadly many routes have become.  

MMP reports also that on the US-Mexico border, a 22-year-old Honduran man lost his life when attempting to cross the Río Bravo near Piedras Negras, Mexico, on 15 August. This is the 53rd drowning victim recorded on the US-Mexico border in 2018. 

Missing Migrants Project data are compiled by IOM staff but come from a variety of sources, some of which are unofficial. To learn more about how data on migrants deaths and disappearances are collected, click here

For latest arrivals and fatalities in the Mediterranean, please visit: http://migration.iom.int/europe 

Learn more about the Missing Migrants Project at: http://missingmigrants.iom.int 

For more information, please contact: 

Joel Millman at IOM HQ, Tel: +41 79 103 8720, Email: jmillman@iom.int 

Mircea Mocanu, IOM Romania, Tel:  +40212115657, Email: mmocanu@iom.int 

Dimitrios Tsagalas, IOM Cyprus, Tel: + 22 77 22 70, E-mail: dtsagalas@iom.int 

Flavio Di Giacomo, IOM Coordination Office for the Mediterranean, Italy, Tel: +39 347 089 8996, Email: fdigiacomo@iom.int 

Hicham Hasnaoui, IOM Morocco, Tel: + 212 5 37 65 28 81, Email: hhasnaoui@iom.int 

Kelly Namia, IOM Greece, Tel: +30 210 991 2174, Email: knamia@iom.int 

Julia Black, IOM GMDAC, Tel: +49 30 278 778 27, Email: jblack@iom.int 

Christine Petré, IOM Libya, Tel: +216 29 240 448, Email: chpetre@iom.int  

Ana Dodevska, IOM Spain, Tel: +34 91 445 7116, Email: adodevska@iom.int  

Myriam Chabbi, IOM Tunisia, Mobile: +216 28 78 78 05, Tel: +216 71 860 312 (Ext. 109), Email: mchabbi@iom.int 

Language English Posted: Friday, August 17, 2018 - 15:00Image: Region-Country: SwitzerlandThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesMissing MigrantsDefault: Multimedia:  Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals Reach 61,517 in 2018; Deaths Reach 1,524

Tue, 08/14/2018 - 10:57

Geneva – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, reports that 61,517 migrants and refugees entered Europe by sea in 2018 through 12 August. This compares with 118,436 arrivals across the region through the same period last year, and 265,640 in 2016.

Arrivals to Spain in 2018 continue to outpace all other destinations along the littoral – with 2,170 through less than two weeks of August, or nearly the entire volume (2,476) to Spain through this date in all of 2016. By contrast, arrivals to Italy – 19,231 through 12 August of this year – are lower than arrivals recorded during certain individual months in the years 2015-2017 (see chart below).

IOM Rome’s Flavio Di Giacomo on Monday said Italy arrivals for 2018 presently are running at under 20 per cent of 2017’s volumes and a slightly smaller proportion of arrivals in 2016, when some 101,587 irregular migrants entered Italy by sea.

Di Giacomo said that on Friday, the ship “Aquarius” (SOS Mediterranée-MSF) rescued 141 migrants. That ship on Monday was still waiting to enter a safe port, without indications it had arrived in any country after several days at sea.  He added that the Aquarius had rescued migrants who had been on two small wooden boats: one carrying 25 people and a second, much bigger, carrying 116 migrants (among them 73 minors, a baby and a five-year-old child). Rescuers reported that most on board were from the Horn of Africa region, adding there also were migrants from Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Bangladesh, Nigeria, Morocco, Ghana and other countries.

All the rescue operations have been carried out in coordination with the Libyan Rescue Coordination Centre (RCC). Aquarius teams reported that rescued migrants affirmed that during their crossing they had met five different ships which appeared to see them but did not offer any assistance. According to media reports, Italian authorities were not available to provide authorization for access to any Italian port. Di Giacomo cited media reports saying an MSF doctor on board witnessed many migrants malnourished and weak from their time in Libya.

IOM Spain’s Ana Dodevska reported Monday that total arrivals at sea in 2018 have reached 25,101 men, women and children who have been rescued in Western Mediterranean waters through 12 August. Over the year’s first five months, a total of 8,150 men, women and children were rescued in Spanish waters after leaving Africa – an average of 54 per day. In the 73 days since May 31, a total of 16,484 have arrived – or just over 230 migrants per day (see chart below).

IOM’s migration data center in Berlin on Monday reported that over the last two decades sea arrivals of some 95,000 irregular migrants have entered Spain via the Western Mediterranean, nearly half that total arriving just since the start of 2017. Over 44,000 additional migrants have entered Spain irregularly during that period via land routes to Spain’s enclaves in northern Africa (see chart below).

On Monday IOM Athens’ Christine Nikolaidou reported that over four days (9-12 August) IOM learned from the Hellenic Coast Guard (HCG) of at least six incidents requiring search and rescue operations off the islands of Kos, Samos and Lesvos. The HCG rescued a total 192 migrants and transferred them to those islands.

Another 208 arrivals scattered among those islands brings to 400 the total number of arrivals during those days, and to a total of 16,834 for the year so far (see charts below).

  
IOM’s Missing Migrants Project has documented the deaths of 2,373 individuals during migration to international destinations in 2018, through 12 August.  No new deaths on the Mediterranean routes were recorded since last week (see chart below).

Nonetheless, the MMP project did record migrant deaths along the Balkan route, a land passage often used by irregular Middle Eastern migrants who enter Greece from Turkey. Most recently, two men holding Syrian passports died in a rockslide early Sunday morning while transiting though Croatia. The two bodies, as well as 10 survivors, were found by Croatian police in the forest near Drežnica. The survivors expressed their intent to file applications for international protection and were transferred to the Croatian Reception Center for Asylum Seekers in Zagreb.

In Central America, MMP reported that a man presumed to be a Central American migrant was killed after falling from a northbound train in Tlaxcala, Mexico on 5 August. Freight trains, nicknamed La Bestia (‘the Beast’), are frequently used by irregular migrants in Mexico, but are notoriously dangerous: 147 deaths have been recorded on La Bestia since 2014, though the true number is likely higher.

MMP data are compiled by IOM staff but come from a variety of sources, some of which are unofficial. To learn more about how data on missing migrants are collected, click here.

For latest arrivals and fatalities in the Mediterranean, please visit: http://migration.iom.int/europe
Learn more about the Missing Migrants Project at: http://missingmigrants.iom.int

For more information, please contact:
Joel Millman at IOM HQ, Tel: +41 79 103 8720, Email: jmillman@iom.int
Flavio Di Giacomo, IOM Coordination Office for the Mediterranean, Italy, Tel: +39 347 089 8996, Email: fdigiacomo@iom.int
Hicham Hasnaoui, IOM Morocco, Tel: + 212 5 37 65 28 81, Email: hhasnaoui@iom.int
Atigoni Avgeropoulou, IOM Greece, Tel: +30 210 99 19 040 (Ext. 166), Mobile: +30 69 48 92 98 09, Email: aavgeropoulou@iom.int
Kelly Namia, IOM Greece, Tel: +30 210 991 2174, Email: knamia@iom.int
Ivona Zakoska, IOM Regional DTM, Austria, Tel: +43 1 5812222, Email: izakoska@iom.int
Julia Black, IOM GMDAC, Germany, Tel: +49 30 278 778 27, Email: jblack@iom.int
Christine Petré, IOM Libya, Tel: +216 29 240 448, Email: chpetre@iom.int
Ana Dodevska, IOM Spain, Tel: +34 91 445 7116, Email: adodevska@iom.int
Myriam Chabbi, IOM Tunisia, Mobile: +216 28 78 78 05, Tel: +216 71 860 312 (Ext. 109), Email: mchabbi@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, August 14, 2018 - 17:10Image: Region-Country: SwitzerlandDefault: Multimedia:  Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Global Migration Film Festival Project Helps Afghans to Record Their Migration Stories

Tue, 08/14/2018 - 10:57

Herat – A group of 13 young Afghan women and men from different backgrounds and ethnicities have spent a week together in the western Afghan city of Herat to exchange experiences, direct and produce a film about migration.

The initiative is part of IOM’s Global Migration Film Festival Participatory Video Project to engage migrants and host communities in participatory filmmaking that strengthens social cohesion. Participants learn how to use a camera, frame images, tell a story using a microphone and make editorial decisions through consensus.

“In Afghanistan, women often don’t have a voice and we are here also to represent these voices,” said Shokya, who with her friend Masoma, was one of five women in the group. Recently returned from Iran, both were handling a video camera and working with male colleagues for the first time.

Millions of Afghans have experienced migration, both forced and voluntary, in the past four decades. In 2017 alone, 460,000 undocumented Afghans returned or were deported from Iran, 100,000 from Pakistan and 7,000 from various European countries.

In 2018, due to various push and pull factors including a deteriorating economic situation in Iran, tightening border controls in Turkey and an ongoing drought in Afghanistan, over 500,000 undocumented people returned between January–July.

“Afghanistan is currently facing the worst drought in decades, which threatens to destroy the livelihoods of 1.4 million Afghans. In a country where large parts of the population rely on agriculture as the sole source of income, the current situation puts an additional burden on breadwinners already struggling to feed their families,” said IOM Afghanistan Chief of Mission and Special Envoy Laurence Hart. “Due to chronic under development in rural areas, many Afghans depend on economic opportunities in neighboring Iran.”

But with an increasingly fragile Iranian economy, Afghans are returning home in large numbers. Without remittance payments from abroad, and no jobs at home, many families have no option but to migrate to urban centers like Herat. Over 52,000 people have moved to the city since the beginning of the drought and live in camp like situations in 179 sites throughout the city.

“This participatory video project generates dialogue between groups affected by migration in different ways – internally displaced people (IDPs), returnees or part of the Herati host community,” said IOM Afghanistan Public Information Officer Eva Schwoerer.
 
The video was partly filmed in a desolate IDP camp on the outskirts of the city, which is home to more over 50,000 people driven from their homes by drought and conflict. Other sections were filmed in the gardens of the Manzar-e Jahad museum, which offers a panoramic view of the city, and in a community, where facilitators led a participatory video editing session followed by a community screening.

At the end of the year, at the 3rd Global Migration Film Festival, an international version of the video “Welcome to Our Life” will be screened around the world. You can watch “Behind the Scenes” here.
 
IOM’s GMFF Participatory Video Project, funded by the IOM Development Fund and supported by NORCAP, was launched in Amman, Jordan, in October 2017. In November it travelled to Malakal, South Sudan, and in December to Geneva, Switzerland. In 2018 moved to a shelter for Venezuelan migrants in the North of Brazil and in July focused on a group of Malagasy women victims of human trafficking. Afghanistan was its final destination.

For further information please contact Eva Schwoerer at IOM Afghanistan. Email: eschwoerer@iom.int, Tel. +93 729 229 129.

Language English Posted: Tuesday, August 14, 2018 - 17:05Image: Region-Country: AfghanistanDefault: Multimedia: 

“Welcome to My Life” – a film about migration in western Afghanistan – will screen at the 3rd Global Migration Film Festival. Photo: Amanda Nero / IOM 2018

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

UN Migration Agency Releases Detailed Assessments of Displacement Sites in Ethiopia’s Gedeo, West Guji

Tue, 08/14/2018 - 10:56

Dilla – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, has released its latest displacement reports from the crisis in Ethiopia’s Gedeo and West Guji zones, where some 958,175 people have been displaced by inter-communal conflict. In July, IOM conducted assessments of displacement sites in both zones where it found nearly 359,113 people sheltering in collective sites. The remainder of the displaced population is living with local communities, for example, in rented accommodation or with relatives, while still visiting the collective sites to access humanitarian assistance.

In March 2018, historically recurring clashes between communities along the border of two Ethiopian regions – Southern Nations, Nationalities, and Peoples' Region (SNNPR) and Oromia Region – began again. As the fighting intensified in June, hundreds of thousands of people fled their homes with little more than the clothes they were wearing. IOM assessments, carried out in close coordination with the Ethiopian Government, found that in both zones, West Guji was the zone of origin of the largest group of displaced people while, more specifically, Kerca was the predominant woreda (district) of origin.

In Gedeo, the zone where the majority of the 970,000 displaced people are living, there are at least 276,939 people in 134 collective sites. The collective sites range from schools to government buildings and disused or unfinished buildings. In seven of the sites, more than half of the residents are living outside or in open spaces. As Ethiopia is experiencing its cold and rainy season, providing adequate shelter to these displaced communities is a priority for IOM.

In 59 of the Gedeo sites more than half the people did not have enough drinking water and in 64 of the sites, half did not have appropriate access to latrines.

Many of the sites in Gedeo are in remote areas and 19 of the 134 are inaccessible by car, making humanitarian aid delivery extremely difficult. Four sites are completely inaccessible whatsoever, which means assisting these communities is near impossible.

In West Guji, some 82,174 displaced people are sheltering in 43 collective sites of which five are inaccessible and as with those in Gedeo, the main area of origin of the displaced population is Kerca, West Guji. In 12 sites in West Guji, over a quarter of the population are living outside or in open spaces.

In sites in both zones, people began arriving in March and were still arriving in July as the assessments were being carried out. Health facilities are mostly not available in the displacement sites but are no more than 30 minutes away. The most common means of accessing food for families is through food distributions.

IOM’s Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) Rapid Response Site Assessment tool is designed to provide detailed information at site level for emergencies occurring outside the DTM Mobility Tracking data collection periods. Community leaders from the internally displaced population collaborated closely with IOM as key informants during the assessment. The aim of this assessment is to provide the humanitarian community with up to-date information on the locations, needs and demographics of displaced populations. Visit IOM’s data portal for displacement in Ethiopia here.

For more information, please contact Dan Salmon at IOM Ethiopia, Tel: +251 902 411 861, +251 966 368 174, Email: dsalmon@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, August 14, 2018 - 17:00Image: Region-Country: EthiopiaDefault: Multimedia: 

Displaced Ethiopians receive aid to help them through the cold and rainy season. Photo: Olivia Headon/IOM 2018

Displaced Ethiopians receive aid to help them through the cold and rainy season. Photo: Olivia Headon/IOM 2018

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

UN Migration Agency Helps More Than 30,000 Migrants Return Safely to Over 30 Countries of Origin

Tue, 08/14/2018 - 10:56
Language English

Tripoli - “I miss my family more than you can imagine. I know they will be waiting for me at the airport when I arrive to Nigeria. I am going home to get my masters, find a good job, and have a family of my own,” said ”Ken,” moments before he boarded the flight returning home via IOM’s Voluntary Humanitarian Return Assistance and Reintegration programme (VHR).

Since the beginning of 2017, IOM’s VHR programme has been able to bring home more than 30,000 migrants from various nationalities stranded in different regions in Libya. They are returned safely to homes and families, coming back to 31 countries of origin in collaboration with embassies and the Libyan authorities.

Launched in Libya in 2005, the VHR programme provides emergency assistance to stranded migrants who wish to return to their countries of origin, both from detention centres and urban areas. Migrants wishing to return home receive consular support from their relevant embassies to ensure they have valid travel documents. IOM provides medical check-ups, protection screenings as well as non-food items (NFIs) including clothes, footwear and hygiene kits prior to the departure. Vulnerable migrants, such as unaccompanied minors, as well as migrants in need of close medical attention are provided with escorts from IOM doctors and protection teams. Ensuring their safety and good health conditions remains the organization’s top priority.

As part of its regular visits to detention centres outside of Tripoli, an IOM team continues to conduct field visits to various detention centres (DCs) such as ones in Misrata, Zwara, Al Khoms, Zawyah, Zliten, and Benghazi. So far this year, more than 1,000 migrants outside of Tripoli received online consular assistance to ensure and facilitate the completion of their registration process, documentation and issuance of exit visas.

On the 5th of June, IOM organized its first charter flight from the city of Zintan (136 Km southwest of Tripoli), which was the first International flight departing from the Zintan airport, and provided safe humanitarian return assistance to 171 stranded migrants going home to Nigeria.

“With the increasing numbers of migrants wishing to return home, we are also planning to have more commercial and chartered flights depart from airports in various cities, in addition to regular ones departing from Tripoli,” says Othman Belbeisi, IOM Libya Chief of Mission.  “We believe it is of utmost priority to provide migrants with the option to return home and rebuild their lives.”

The 23rd of July 2018 marks the launch of the VHR hotline, which was established as a response to the growing number of requests for voluntary return from migrants in detention centres and urban areas. The aim of the hotline is to facilitate their access to quick information and assistance, and respond to their queries regarding the programme. 

Upon arrival, an IOM team meets the returnees at the airport to discuss their reintegration needs and provide post-arrival assistance, including food, water, medical support and an onward transportation to their homes.

IOM extends its utmost appreciation to the European Union, the governments of Italy, Germany, Finland, Norway, the Netherlands, Switzerland and the United Kingdom, for their generous and continuous support to its VHR programme.

For more information please contact Maya Abu Ata in IOM Libya, Tel: +216 53 382 385, Email: mabuata@iom.int

Posted: Tuesday, August 14, 2018 - 16:54Image: Region-Country: LibyaDefault: Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

IOM Voluntary Humanitarian Returns Continue in Libya as Number of Detained Migrants Soars

Fri, 08/10/2018 - 09:19

Geneva  Between January and July 2018, IOM, the UN Migration Agency, safely returned 10,950 stranded migrants from Libya through its Voluntary Humanitarian Return (VHR) Programme as the number of detainees in the country rose alarmingly. The majority of the migrants, 9,636, returned home to countries in Central and West Africa on IOM charter flights. A group of 325 people returned to East Africa and the Horn of Africa, and the remainder to North Africa and Asia.

IOM charter flights are coordinated in cooperation with the Libyan authorities, embassies and consulates in countries of return along with IOM country offices and other international organizations. In addition, IOM has assisted a total of 1,314 migrants to return home from Libya on commercial flights in 2018 so far.

Many migrants from Libya often opt to return home after arriving in Niger by land, from where IOM organizes their onward transportation to their countries of origin. In 2018 (January–July), IOM returned 2,175 migrants from Niger to their homes (1,443 by charters and 732 by commercial airlines).

The VHR programme was launched in 2016 as part of the EU-IOM Joint Initiative on Migrant Protection and Reintegration with funding from the European Union Emergency Trust Fund for Africa (EUTF) in Libya and other countries in Africa. With a high demand among migrants to return home, IOM scaled up its efforts to assist migrants including the expansion of reception centres, reintegration activities and community-based support to returnees and victims of trafficking.

In October 2017, the number of migrants in official detention centres dropped five-fold largely due to IOM’s efforts to accelerate the repatriation of migrants and the closure of detention centres. However, in recent months there has been an alarming rise in the number of refugees and migrants intercepted at sea and returned to Libya, with the figure nearly doubling from 5,500 to 9,300 between 2017 and 2018. There are no figures available for the number of migrants detained in informal detention centres run by militias or smugglers.

In April 2018, IOM identified 179,400 internally displaced persons (IDPs) along with 690,351 migrants within the country. Despite the current circumstances, Libya continues to be the main transit and destination point for migrants looking to a better life in Europe. Access the latest IOM Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) figures for Libya here.

IOM reports that the total number of migrants and refugees that entered Europe by the Mediterranean Sea is 60,309 since the start of 2018 through (8 August). This figure is about half of the 117,988 arrivals in 2017 at this time last year. The cause of the number of arrivals decreasing is largely due to a series of measures that have been adopted by EU Member States since late 2016, including the closure of the migratory route across the Mediterranean.

In 2018, the coordination of rescue operations was handed over to the Libyan Coast Guard from the Italian Coast Guard.

For latest arrivals and fatalities in the Mediterranean, please visit: http://migration.iom.int/europe

For more information please contact IOM Libya:
Maya Abu Ata, Tel: +216 29 240 448, Email: mabuata@iom.int
Christine Petre, Tel: +216 29 240 448, Email: chpetre@iom.int

Language English Posted: Friday, August 10, 2018 - 15:30Image: Region-Country: LibyaThemes: Assisted Voluntary Return and ReintegrationEUTFHumanitarian EmergenciesDefault: Multimedia: 

A migrant mother and child get ready to board IOM's first VHR charter from Zintan, Libya. File photo: IOM 2018

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

IOM Responds to Ebola in DR Congo; Continues to Support Communities Affected by Previous Outbreaks

Fri, 08/10/2018 - 09:18

North Kivu – New cases of Ebola were reported in the North Kivu Province of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) on July 31, just days after the country’s ninth epidemic was declared over in the Equateur Province. IOM, the UN Migration Agency, is carrying out mobility mapping of the affected area, while beginning measures to help contain and end the new Ebola epidemic.

The outbreak in North Kivu is currently centred in the Mangani health area of the Mabalako health zone, which is situated in the Beni territory, adjacent to the Ituri Province in the north and Uganda in the east. The affected area is linked to the surrounding localities by road, an airstrip and a lake port. Through its airstrip, Beni territory is directly connected to two international airports, Goma and Kisangani, which also connects the territory to the rest of the DRC, including the country’s capital, Kinshasa. There are numerous communities living along the border with Uganda, which suggests strong cross-border ties and movement. All these factors indicate a potential risk for spread of the outbreak.

The North Kivu Province is densely populated with 8 million inhabitants. The Beni territory has a population of 1.5 million people, of whom 800,000 live in the town of Beni. The Mangani health area itself has 30,000 inhabitants, further increasing the risk of the outbreak spreading.

Between 11 May until 07 August, 36 deaths were recorded out of a total of 43 cases. Out of the 36 deaths, nine are confirmed as Ebola and 27 are labelled “probable” as these happened a possible outbreak was raised and need further investigation.

Beni town is a centre of commerce where people from Mangani, an agricultural community, bring their produce to sell. Travellers and traders from Beni pass through Mangani to reach Mambasa and then Kisangani. Others pass through Mangani and then Beni to reach Butembo and Goma (south), Komanda and Bunia (north), as well as Uganda (east). IOM has deployed an epidemiologist to Beni as part of the coordinated response to this latest outbreak.

North Kivu is also affected by insecurity and decades of conflict, hosting approximately one million internally displaced persons (IDPs). Although there are no displacement camps in Beni Territory, more than 12,000 IDPs are living with host communities in Kasindi town in Beni Territory near the Ugandan border. In June and July of 2018, nearly 2,400 IDPs returned to Kokala, a health area north of Beni town. The majority of the over 270,000 DR Congolese refugees living in Uganda are from North Kivu. The influx of Congolese refugees into Uganda has been continuous since 2012.

IOM has started a mobility mapping exercise to track population movements in the area, which borders with Uganda. It also intends to carry out health screening and promote hygiene at key points of entry. IOM has identified 28 points of entry to the affected area that need immediate implementation of prevention, surveillance and communication activities. IOM will support Health Ministry to strengthen coordination with neighbouring countries at national and community level. In relation to this, IOM hosted a training for 40 Government health staff on health screening, hand washing and risk communication to enhance the effectiveness and the quality of health screening in Goma Airport, Petite Porte and Grande Porte at the border with Rwanda.

In addition to responding to this most recent outbreak, IOM is supporting communities affected by a previous epidemic in Equateur Province. To ensure the outbreak does not recur, IOM is continuing its prevention, surveillance and communication activities in that Province.

For more information, please contact Jean-Philippe Chauzy at IOM DRC, Tel: +243 827339827, Email: jpchauzy@iom.int

Language English Posted: Friday, August 10, 2018 - 15:25Image: Region-Country: Democratic Republic of the CongoThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesMigration HealthDefault: Multimedia: 

IOM supported health screenings at points of entry such as river ports to stop ebola. File Photo: IOM 2018

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

IOM Medical Consultations Hit 500,000 as Demand for Healthcare Spikes in Waterlogged Rohingya Refugee Camps

Fri, 08/10/2018 - 09:18

Cox’s Bazar – UN Migration Agency medical staff in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, have now carried out over half a million consultations since the Rohingya refugee crisis began nearly a year ago, as monsoon conditions sparked the busiest week of the year for doctors and nurses working in the camps.

Over 16,850 people have sought treatment from IOM in the past week. Among those who battled torrential rain and mud to reach IOM medical facilities were emergency cases suffering from fevers, flu, injuries caused by accidents in the camp, acute abdominal disorders, kidney problems, and pregnancy-related health issues.

With one clinic temporarily closed due to flooding, IOM mobile medical teams have also been in action over the past week, operating from a school and treating 440 patients over five days.

Almost a million Rohingya refugees now live in Cox’s Bazar in what has become the world’s biggest refugee settlement. Violence in Myanmar has caused over 700,000 people to flee across the border to Bangladesh’s southernmost district since August 2017.

As the number of consultations continues to rise, patients explained how they had come to rely on health services provided by IOM over the past year.

Among those attending an IOM clinic this week was Noor Haba, who brought her two-year-old son to see doctors because he was suffering from a fever and a severe cough. She lives ten minutes from the facility in Balukhali camp and said it was her fifth visit to the clinic for herself or her children in the past year.

“It’s a relief to know this clinic is here, because the consultation is free and the staff are kind. I’ve told my friends and neighbors this is the best place to come,” she said.

IOM is one of the biggest medical providers in the Rohingya refugee camps and offers specialized services, including ultrasound, which are helping to save lives.

 “In the past month, we have carried out over 200 ultrasonography tests at our clinic in Kutupalong at the heart of the mega-camp. Patients have been referred from all over the camps as well as from the local Bangladeshi community,” said Dr Raisul Islam, lead doctor at the facility.

“These services can and do save lives. Just last week we carried out an ultrasound examination of a pregnant women and identified that her baby was lying in a transverse – that is sideways – position. If this had gone undiagnosed and unaddressed, both the mother and baby’s life would have been in danger. That same morning, we also used the ultrasound to diagnose a man with kidney stones, a woman with acute abdominal pain, and another woman who was pregnant and needed to be transferred for a caesarian section,” he added.

But with major funding shortages continuing to impact on humanitarian support across the camps, the future of health care for hundreds of thousands of refugees, as well as people living in local villages served by IOM, remains precarious.

“While we are delighted that so many people are aware of IOM medical services and choosing to come here, the sheer scale of the demand is inevitably putting pressure on staff and resources, including our ability to refer patients for specialist and emergency treatment,” said Dr. Andrew Mbala, IOM’s emergency health programme coordinator in Cox’s Bazar.

IOM currently supports 23 medical facilities across Cox’s Bazar. It is the main provider of ambulance services across the camps and plays a key role in ensuring people can access urgent medical treatment 24 hours a day.

For more information please contact Fiona MacGregor at IOM Cox's Bazar, Tel. +8801733335221, Email: fmacgregor@iom.int

Language English Posted: Friday, August 10, 2018 - 15:20Image: Region-Country: BangladeshThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesMigration HealthRohingya CrisisDefault: Multimedia: 

Families wait for treatment at an IOM medical clinic in the Kutupalong Rohingya refugee camp, Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh. Photo: Lydia Moore / IOM 2018

A Rohingya refugee mother and baby attend a consultation at an IOM health clinic in Cox’s Bazar. Photo: Lydia Moore / IOM 2018

Ultrasound services provided by an IOM clinic in Cox’s Bazar are saving lives. Photo: Lydia Moore/IOM 2018

A Rohingya refugee mother and baby attend a consultation at an IOM health clinic in Cox’s Bazar. Photo: Lydia Moore / IOM 2018

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals Reach 60,309 in 2018; Deaths Reach 1,524

Fri, 08/10/2018 - 09:17

Geneva – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, reports that 60,309 migrants and refugees have entered Europe by sea in 2018 through 8 August. Arrivals to Spain during the month’s first eight days are at least five times those to either Italy or Greece, until this year both much more popular destinations for irregular migrants than Spain traditionally has been. This year’s totals through the first week of August are compared with 117,988 at this time last year and 263,436 at this time in 2016

IOM’s Missing Migrants Project has documented the deaths of 1,524 people on the Mediterranean Sea during 2018, ten during the past week.  In the early hours of Thursday (9 August), two women and seven children lost their lives off the coast of Kuşadası, Aydın Province, Turkey, which faces Greece’s Samos island.  Three men and one child were saved in the rescue effort by the Turkish Coast Guard. 

On Tuesday (7 August), the Turkish Coast Guard recovered the remains of one migrant who had drowned off the coast of Demre, in Turkey’s Antalya Province. Those drownings bring to 105 the number of deaths this year in eastern Mediterranean waters, compared with 45 at this time last year and 62 for all of 2017. Previous years were much deadlier, with 434 drownings on this route through all of 2016 and over 806 in 2015. In 2014, 59 irregular migrants drowned or went missing on this route.

With this week’s deaths, the total number of migrants on this route reported lost by IOM’s Missing Migrants Project since the start of 2014 comes to 1,466.

On Thursday, IOM Athens’ Antigoni Avgeropolou reported on three incidents between the dates of 6-8 August that required search and rescue operations off the island of Kos, Samos and Lesvos. The Hellenic Coast Guard rescued a total of 71 migrants and transferred them to those islands. At least 56 other migrants made landings on several Aegean islands during the three-day span bringing to 16,434 the total number of sea arrivals to Greek territory in 2018 (see chart below).

Arrivals to Greece are running close to 35 per cent ahead of last year’s totals at this time, and around 56 per cent of the total number – 29,501 men, women and children – arriving via Greek waters in all of 2017. 

Through June, migrant arrivals to Italy surpassed those to Greece by some 3,000 men, women and children. But in the last 40 days Greece has received more migrants, by about 400 arrivals, and could well surpass all arrivals to Italy in 2018 by the end of the year. It would be the first time since 2015 when more migrant arrivals were recorded in Greece than in Italy.

IOM Madrid’s Ana Dodevska reported Thursday 1,703 irregular migrants have entered Spain through the first eight days of this month, most rescued by the patrol boats of Salvamento Maritimo and the Spanish Guardia Civil.
With those rescues total 2018 arrivals now have reached 24,646 men, women and children – irregular migrants who have entered Europe through Western Mediterranean waters. Additionally, according to Spanish authorities, some 3,959 migrants also have attempted to enter Spain irregularly via its African enclaves at Melilla and Ceuta (see chart below).

Over the year’s first five months, a total of 8,150 men, women and children were rescued in Spanish waters after leaving Africa – and average of 54 per day. In the 69 days since May 31, a total of 16,484 have arrived – or just under 240 migrants per day.

Dodevska added that on Wednesday (8 August), Spanish rescuers intercepted a kayak with four migrants on board. Those individuals were transported to Algeciras.

IOM’s Missing Migrants Project has documented the deaths of 2,370 people during migration to international destinations in 2018 (see chart below).

In addition to this week’s deaths on the Mediterranean, Missing Migrants Project recorded the deaths of five Afghan migrants on 2 August in a vehicle accident that took place as they travelled with 15 others from Khash to Saravan in Iran. 
On 28 July, six migrants, likely from the Horn of Africa, were killed by lightning after they crossed the border clandestinely from Yemen into Jazan Province in Saudi Arabia. 
In Europe, two people were hit and killed by a train at night on 20 July outside Antheia, Alexandropoulis, Greece.  In Mexico, MMP recorded the death of a migrant man hit and killed by a train outside Caborca, Sonora, Mexico. That accident occurred on 16 May.
MMP data are compiled by IOM staff but come from a variety of sources, some of which are unofficial. To learn more about how data on missing migrants are collected, click  here.

For latest arrivals and fatalities in the Mediterranean, please visit: http://migration.iom.int/europe
Learn more about the Missing Migrants Project at: http://missingmigrants.iom.int

For more information, please contact:
Joel Millman at IOM HQ, Tel: +41 79 103 8720, Email: jmillman@iom.int
Flavio Di Giacomo, IOM Coordination Office for the Mediterranean, Italy, Tel: +39 347 089 8996, Email: fdigiacomo@iom.int
Hicham Hasnaoui, IOM Morocco, Tel: + 212 5 37 65 28 81, Email: hhasnaoui@iom.int
AtigoniAvgeropoulou, IOM Greece, Tel: +30 210 99 19 040 (Ext. 166), Mobile: +30 69 48 92 98 09, Email: aavgeropoulou@iom.int
Kelly Namia, IOM Greece, Tel: +30 210 991 2174, Email: knamia@iom.int
Ivona Zakoska, IOM Regional DTM, Austria, Tel: + +43 1 5812222, Email: izakoska@iom.int
Julia Black, IOM GMDAC, Tel: +49 30 278 778 27, Email: jblack@iom.int
Christine Petré, IOM Libya, Tel: +216 29 240 448, Email : chpetre@iom.int
Ana Dodevska, IOM Spain, Tel: +34 91 445 7116, Email: adodevska@iom.int

Myriam Chabbi, IOM Tunisia, Mobile: +216 28 78 78 05, Tel: +216 71 860 312 (Ext. 109), Email: mchabbi@iom.int

Language English Posted: Friday, August 10, 2018 - 15:15Image: Region-Country: SwitzerlandDefault: Multimedia:  Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

UN Migration Agency, Indonesian Government Plan Mentoring Programme to Prosecute, Convict More Human Traffickers

Fri, 08/10/2018 - 09:17

Jakarta IOM and the Indonesian Attorney General’s Office are planning a mentoring scheme to pair prosecutors throughout Indonesia with senior officials who have experience in conducting successful investigations and pursuing criminal proceedings against human traffickers. 

The design of the programme was discussed last week at a two-day meeting in Yogyakarta, Central Java, which brought together experts from law enforcement agencies, social protection bodies and the judiciary.

“According to data from the Anti-Trafficking Task Force and the Attorney General’s Office, only 160 of 214 trafficking cases in 2016 led to convictions,” said Rudi Prabowo Aji, head of the Attorney General’s Training Centre. 

“The response to trafficking is not optimal due to a lack of common understanding about what constitutes ‘trafficking in persons’ among law enforcement officials, as well as a lack of knowledge about gender sensitivity and how to apply a victim-centred approach. This prosecution gap indicates the importance of this mentoring programme.”   

During the meeting, which was sponsored by the Australian Department of Home Affairs, the Attorney General’s Office announced that it would launch a pilot programme later this year.

“Moving beyond conventional classroom methods, the mentoring programme will combine online platforms and face-to-face coaching to allow the sharing of knowledge between law enforcement officers,” said Among Resi, head of IOM Indonesia’s Counter Trafficking and Labour Migration Unit.

“This innovative effort shows the government’s commitment to improve the successful prosecution of human trafficking cases in Indonesia.”

Indonesia remains a source, transit, and destination country for human trafficking.  Since 2007 it has been rated Tier 2 by the US State Department’s annual Trafficking in Persons report. Tier 2 is applied to countries that do not fully comply with the US Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act but are making significant efforts to bring themselves into compliance.

IOM programmes in Indonesia support the effective prosecution of individuals and transnational networks engaged in human trafficking. Since 2017, IOM has trained 125 prosecutors from provincial and district attorney offices on handling trafficking cases under Indonesian law, with a particular focus on the protection of victims and witnesses. The trainings use recently completed guidelines for law enforcement and prosecutors that were also developed with the support of the Australian Department of Home Affairs. 

“Working alongside law enforcement is just one way IOM improves protection for victims of trafficking and facilitates their access to justice.  We also collaborate with local partners throughout Indonesia to provide legal support to victims, to connect them with lawyers, and to support their rehabilitation,” said Resi.

Since 2005, IOM Indonesia has identified and assisted over 9,000 victims of trafficking.  The majority were Indonesian nationals exploited in Indonesia, Malaysia, the Middle East and other migrant destination countries. Many were also foreigners, including hundreds of Cambodian and Myanmar nationals enslaved aboard Thai fishing boats operating in Indonesian waters.

For more information please contact Among Resi at IOM Indonesia, Tel. +62 215 7951275, Email:aresi@iom.int

Language English Posted: Friday, August 10, 2018 - 15:10Image: Region-Country: IndonesiaThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesRohingya CrisisDefault: Multimedia: 

Indonesian law enforcement officials meeting in Yogyakarta plan to use a mentoring scheme to successfully prosecute more human trafficking cases. Photo: IOM 2018

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

More than 13,000 Internally Displaced Persons Benefit from Environmental Clean-up Campaign in Somalia

Fri, 08/10/2018 - 09:16

Baidoa On Saturday (04/08) more than 13,000 internally displaced persons (IDPs) participated in an environmental clean-up campaign organized by IOM, the UN Migration Agency, in coordination with the Camp Coordination and Camp Management (CCCM) outreach team in Baidoa, Somalia.

As part of efforts to bridge divisions and unite the diverse community groups to work toward the common goals of peace, development and reconciliation, the clean-up exercise focused on voluntarism among the IDPs and the host community.  

“Heaps of garbage covered the few available roads in the IDP sites. The lack of accessible roads greatly undermined social development and recovery efforts; however, with today’s clean up, accessibility to our sites will be easier,” said Adan Ahmed, an IDP leader in Baidoa.

IOM provided sanitation materials to 270 IDP sites for the clean-up exercise. The volunteers began their clean-up activities in the IDP sites, swarming over the narrow dirt lanes to remove large volumes of refuse that lay in front of residents’ shelters.

“I never had such a proud moment as when we cleaned our own houses and street,” said Habibo, one of the participants. “Today the streets are clean, our environment welcoming and our morale high.”

The environmental clean-up campaign in Baidoa is funded by the European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations (ECHO). To date, over 19,600 IDPs have benefited from the programme which IOM hopes to expand across the different sites in Baidoa.

For more information, please contact Hannah Curweh at IOM Somalia, Tel: 254 796 163 358 (Kenya), +252 612 470 027 (Somalia), Email: hcurweh@iom.int

Language English Posted: Friday, August 10, 2018 - 15:08Image: Region-Country: SomaliaThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesInternally Displaced PersonsDefault: Multimedia: 

Beneficiaries of IOM’s environmental clean-up exercise in Baidoa, Somalia. Photo: IOM 2018/Ahmed Mohamed Ali

Beneficiaries of IOM’s environmental clean-up exercise in Baidoa, Somalia. Photo: IOM 2018/Ahmed Mohamed Ali

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Switzerland Funds UN Migration Agency to Expand Migrant Presence, Flow Monitoring in Turkey

Thu, 08/09/2018 - 04:39

Ankara – Istanbul has increasingly become a destination city for migrants and refugees from countries such as Syria, Iran, Afghanistan, Iraq and Somalia. According to the latest available figures from the Turkish Directorate General of Migration Management (DGMM), these nationalities make up a majority of the over 500,000 registered foreign nationals in Istanbul and the 3,9 million registered nationwide. Many migrants and refugees from these countries are vulnerable and in need of assistance.

Over the next year, with support from the Swiss Secretariat for Migration, IOM, the UN Migration Agency, will expand its Migrant Presence Monitoring (MPM) Programme to include Istanbul province. MPM is an important tool developed by IOM to support DGMM and the humanitarian community track migratory flows in Turkey to better manage migration and address issues of integration, registration and service provision of and for migrants and refugees.

Results from MPM flow monitoring surveys conducted with migrants in 15 provinces found that Istanbul was the first destination city of choice among the 42 per cent of respondents, a majority of whom cited opportunities for employment as their reason for choosing to move. With large flows to Istanbul, Government and non-governmental service providers often face challenges tracking migrant and refugee families and their needs. The expansion of MPM to Istanbul will better enable them to identify and assist particularly vulnerable individuals.

“It is crucial to better understand the challenges faced by refugees and migrants, as well as by the host communities, to enable better policy decisions and improve humanitarian response,” said Tiziano Balmelli, Chargé d’Affaires a.i. of the Swiss Embassy in Ankara. “With its expansion, MPM will be able to cover 80 per cent of the areas in Turkey where vulnerable migrants and refugees reside. The Swiss Government values the contributions of IOM’s MPM programme, the only comprehensive programme of its kind in Turkey,” added Balmelli.

IOM Turkey has implemented MPM since May 2016 to monitor the movement and intentions of migrants and refugees around the country. With this one-year grant from the Swiss, the addition of Istanbul will bring the total number of provinces where MPM operates to 26.

MPM data highlights migration trends, informs national policies, and helps identify vulnerable migrants and refugees in order to provide them with essential support. For example, IOM and humanitarian partners use MPM data each year to provide migrant and refugee families with relief items during the cold winter months across south-eastern Turkey.

The expansion of the programme will also establish five new key flow monitoring points in Edirne, Gaziantep, Izmir, Istanbul and Agri provinces which have dynamic internal and external migratory flows. 

“We are filling a crucial need for migration data that gives us insight into migrants and refugees on the move in Turkey,” said Lado Gvilava, IOM’s Chief of Mission in Turkey. “Without it, we would not be able to help provide basic needs and improve their quality of life,” said Gvilava. 

For more information, please contact Lanna Walsh at IOM Turkey, Tel: +90 312 454 3048, Email: lwalsh@iom.int

Language English Posted: Thursday, August 9, 2018 - 10:24Image: Region-Country: TurkeyDefault: Multimedia: 

IOM Turkey Chief of Mission Lado Gvilava and Swiss Embassy First Secretary Tobias Schäpfer sign the new project agreement to expand MPM. © IOM/Emrah Ozesen

A member of IOM Turkey’s MPM team conducts an interview for MPM reporting.  ©IOM Turkey 

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

IOM: USD 45 Million Needed for 2018-2020 Migrant Response in Horn of Africa, Yemen

Tue, 08/07/2018 - 09:06

Nairobi – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, and its partners launched, on 6 August, a Regional Migrant Response Plan (RMRP) for the Horn of Africa and Yemen through which they are appealing to the international community for USD 45 million. The plan details support to migrants on the move in the Horn of Africa and Yemen from 2018 to 2020.

The response plan, developed in coordination with regional and country level non-governmental and intergovernmental partners, is a migrant-focused humanitarian and development strategy for vulnerable migrants from the Horn of Africa, specifically those from Somalia, Djibouti and Ethiopia, moving to and from Yemen. The plan targets some 81,000 people.

Irregular migration from the Horn of Africa to the Gulf countries has been steadily increasing over the past few years, with approximately 100,000 people entering Yemen, a major transit point on this route, in 2017. Often, migrants and refugees cross the Gulf of Aden from Djibouti or Somalia, arriving in Yemen with the support of smugglers.

The countries on this route are beset with humanitarian challenges. In Yemen, partners estimate that more than 20 million people need humanitarian assistance, while Somalia and Ethiopia are also in the grip of complex emergencies because of conflict and recurrent disasters. 

The plan estimates that, like in 2017, up to 100,000 new arrivals from the Horn of Africa will reach Yemen in 2018, while 200,000 migrants and refugees will return from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and Yemen to the Horn of Africa countries in the same period. Of these, 150,000 and 50,000 will return to Ethiopia and Somalia, respectively.

“This Regional Migrant Response Plan will guide IOM and its partners in addressing the growing needs of irregular migrants moving between the Horn of Africa and Yemen,” said Jeffrey Labovitz, IOM Regional Director for the East and Horn of Africa. “The humanitarian needs in the region remain immense, which leave migrants and host communities in a vulnerable situation,” he added.

The three-year plan includes urgent humanitarian interventions. It also details longer term actions to address the drivers of migration, build local migration management capacity and provide sustainable socioeconomic infrastructure to support communities of origin, transit and destination. The objectives of the plan are in keeping with the Sustainable Development Goals, connecting humanitarian and development field work.

For more information, please contact IOM’s Regional Office in Nairobi:

Salvatore Sortino (programmatic enquiries) Tel: +254 20 4221 171 or +254 700 638 444, Email: ssortino@iom.int
Kenneth Odiwuor (media enquiries), Tel: +254 722 560363, Email: kodiwuor@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, August 7, 2018 - 15:00Image: Region-Country: KenyaDefault: Multimedia: 

Ethiopian migrants in Obock, Djibouti, walk to a shaded area to await smugglers to bring them to Yemen. Photo: Olivia Headon/IOM 2018

Horn of Africa and Yemen migrant flows.

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Call for Applications: ‘Start and Scale-Up for SDGs’ at Global Entrepreneurship Week 2018

Tue, 08/07/2018 - 09:03

Geneva IOM, the UN Migration Agency, joins the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) and partners in announcing a call for applications to participate in the prestigious youth entrepreneurship pitching event entitled Start and Scale-up for SDGs. The event will take place in Geneva, Switzerland on 15 November 2018 as part of Global Entrepreneurship Week (12-16 November 2018).

Young entrepreneurs from around the world are invited to pitch business ideas that contribute to at least one of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Experts will then provide comprehensive feedback on the submissions, and how businesses can promote sustainable and inclusive growth through entrepreneurship in line with the UN Agenda on Sustainable Development.

A selected panel of impact investors, sustainable finance specialists and other experts will provide feedback on how to promote sustainable and inclusive growth through entrepreneurship in line with the UN Agenda 2030 on Sustainable Development.

Applications from young entrepreneurs with migrant backgrounds including returning migrants; businesses or business ideas which partner with migrants; as well as businesses which offer migration related solutions, are particularly encouraged.

Following a rigorous evaluation of submitted applications according to a predefined eligibility and selection criteria, 10 selected candidates will be invited to visit Geneva during the Global Entrepreneurship Week (GEW). They will be invited to showcase their business ideas to impact investors and sustainable finance partners.

Participants will receive individual feedback from experts; attend a customized workshop on intellectual property led by WIPO; benefit from coaching sessions on resilience and leadership skills provided by FlowInAction; and attend a wide variety of events organized in Geneva during the GEW.

In addition, the candidates in the ‘Scale-Up’ competition will have an opportunity to win an equity fund of USD 15,000. Candidates in the ‘Start-Up’ competition will have an opportunity to win a grant of USD 5,000. The prizes are sponsored by ONE CREATION, a Swiss Investment cooperative whose commitments reflect the combination of social, economic and environmental priorities.

To participate in the Youth Entrepreneurship Pitching Event ‘Start and Scale-up for SDGs’, applicants are invited to fill in the attached application form below, include a picture of themselves and provide relevant attachments that give the review committee a better understanding of their businesses.

The application form is available here and must be submitted electronically before 1 September 2018 at the following email address: empretec@unctad.org

 

Eligibility criteria for applications
  • Candidates must be aged between 15 and 34 as of 1 September 2018.
  • Candidates may apply to the start-up or the scale-up competition, based on the following criteria:
  • Start-up competition: Business ideas, concepts and/or prototypes must be at the very initial stages of development or at early operational stage (1-12 months)
  • Scale-up competition: Established businesses must have been at least one year in operation or more (12 months+).
  • All ideas, concepts and/or businesses must aim to contribute to at least one of the United Nations' 17 Sustainable Development Goals. More specifically, ideas, concepts and/or businesses must embed elements of social, economic or environmental sustainability, either in the resulting final product or service of the business, or in the process used to make the product or deliver the service.
  • All applications must only be submitted using the application form and should include a picture of the applicant and any eventual attachments.
  • Applicants must disclose any start or scale-up funding already received at the time of applying.
Selection criteria
  • Ideas, concepts and/or businesses with clear elements of sustainability will be valued the most. The ideas and concepts for products, services or value propositions need to make an obvious contribution to achieving one of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals. What will the impact on society be?
  • Besides the main aforementioned aspect of sustainability, the following criteria will be used to select the applicants invited to the pitching event.
    • Customer needs to be clearly identified (needs)
      • How is the product or service going to add value for customers? Which of the customers’ problems is the product/service going to solve?
    • Business model (approach)
      • How will the product or service generate revenue (sales, subscription, advertisement, etc.)? How much does it expect to sell in the first year of business?
    • Differentiators identified (differentiation)
      • How is the product or service different from or better than the existing products or services offered by other, competing businesses for the same customers? What is the competitive advantage that allows the business to outperform / do better than competitors (patent, algorithm, unique service model, etc.)?
    • Initial market identified, and sufficiently large and growing (competition)
      • Who will be buying the product or service? How big is the existing market? What is the potential scalability of the business?
  • Two kinds of entrepreneurship ideas are particularly encouraged (i) proposals from young entrepreneurs with migrant background or those offering migration related solutions, and (ii) proposals that provide specific attention to climate change solutions, sustainable environmental management and solutions for sustainable natural resource use.

For more information please contact IOM Headquarters:
Vanessa Okoth-Obbo, Tel: +41 22 717 9366, Email: vokoth@iom.int
Deepali Fernandes, Tel: +41 22 717 9547, Email: dfernandes@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, August 7, 2018 - 14:55Image: Region-Country: SwitzerlandDefault: Multimedia: 

Global Entrepreneurship Week 2018 themes, announced this week, are recognizing women, youth and inclusion in entrepreneurship and connecting ecosystems around the world. 

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals Reach 59,271 in 2018; Deaths Reach 1,504

Tue, 08/07/2018 - 09:02

Geneva – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, reports that 59,271 migrants and refugees entered Europe by sea through 5 August 2018. That total compares to 117,102 at this time last year, and over 263,436 at this time in 2016.

Arrivals to Spain (see chart below) lead all countries with 23,741, or just over 40 per cent of all Mediterranean irregular migrants, who this year have surpassed those coming on competing routes. Their migration volume has nearly tripled the number of those registered at this time last year, when some 8,677 had arrived through 31 July. 

Arrivals to Italy trail Spain by almost 5,000. Two weeks ago, the gap between those two destination points was just under 200 individuals – an indicator of how quickly the Spanish route has surged. Italy now reports receiving less than a third of all irregular sea arrivals (around 32 per cent), while Greece continues to receive about 28 per cent, an amount that has remained steady throughout the year.

Significantly, Greece’s arrivals thus far in 2018 are running nearly 5,000 ahead of last year’s totals on this date, an increase of almost 50 per cent.  Arrivals to Italy, on the other hand, are down over 80 per cent compared to 2017 data.

IOM’s Missing Migrants Project has documented the deaths of 1,514 men, women and children seeking to cross the Mediterranean in 2018 – the same number IOM reported last week. Despite the smaller volumes overall, migrants’ Mediterranean passages remains among the deadliest on earth. On a per capita basis, 2 per cent of all migrant attempts last year ended in fatality, compared with 2.5 per cent in 2018. That amounts to twenty deaths per thousand crossers in 2017, rising to twenty-five per thousand reported lost in 2018.

Also notable are the relative differences in lethality between Mediterranean routes in 2018. Despite accounting for fewer than a third of all arrivals to Europe, migration originating in Libya accounts this year for almost three-quarters of all deaths in sea passage. Adding 1,111 fatalities to 18,872 arrivals to Italy yields a total of just under 20,000 crossers on this Central Mediterranean route—and over 55 deaths per thousand crossing attempts, more than double the regional average. In comparison, fatalities for the Western Mediterranean route are about 13 per thousand in 2018; for the Eastern Mediterranean route linking Turkey to Greece and Cyprus the death rate this year is less than six drowning victims per thousand.

IOM Madrid’s Ana Dodevska reported Monday that during this past weekend, a total of 610 individuals were rescued by the patrol boats of Salvamento Maritimo and the Spanish Guardia Civil (395 on Saturday, 4 August; another 215 on Sunday, 5 August).

With those rescues, total 2018 arrivals through 5 August have reached 23,741 men, women and children – irregular migrants who have entered Europe through Western Mediterranean waters. Additionally, according to Spanish authorities, some 3,725 migrants have attempted to enter Spain irregularly via its African enclaves at Melilla and Ceuta.
Over the year’s first five months, a total of 8,150 men, women and children were rescued in Spanish waters after leaving Africa – an average of 54 per day. In the 66 days since 31 May, a total of 15,591 have arrived –or just over 235 migrants per day.
     
IOM Athens’ Antigone Avgeropoulou said Monday that IOM has learned from the Hellenic Coast Guard (HCG) of at least one incident between the four days (2-5 August) requiring search and rescue operations off the island of Psara. The HCG rescued a total of 96 migrants and transferred them to Psara and Chios. Another 96 landed without intervention on Lesvos, Samos and Kos – bringing to 16,307 the total number arrivals this year through 5 August (see chart below).

Worldwide, IOM’s Missing Migrants Project has documented the deaths of 2,346 people during migration to international destinations in 2018 (see chart below). 

While no new deaths were reported over the weekend on any of the three Mediterranean Sea routes, reports of migrant deaths in other regions have emerged since Friday. In Europe, a young Pakistani migrant was killed during the last week of July while trying to reach the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia from Greece. Greek authorities arrested eight people – with whom the victim reportedly was travelling – in relation to the crime. In North Africa, the remains of three Egyptian men, who were migrating likely with the help of smugglers, were found 100km west of Al Jaghbub, in Libya.

In the Americas, records were added for nine people who were found dead after crossing from Mexico into Pima County, Arizona in the month of July. Their identities, let alone their causes of death, will likely remain unknown because of the fast rate of decomposition in the desert heat. In Texas, US Border Patrol officers found the body of a man near the town of Pharr, in Hidalgo County, who reportedly died of dehydration and heat exhaustion. 

On the US-Mexico border, three people died in recent days while trying to cross into the United States. On 24 July, US Border Patrol officers responded to a distress call regarding two Mexican nationals, a father and son, who were lost in a ranch near Sullivan City, Texas. When they found them, they were taken to the local hospital, where the father died of cardiac arrest. On the same day, Mexican civil protection authorities recovered the body of a young man from the Río Bravo/Grande, near the first international bridge in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas.

A fourth victim, a man, also was killed on his way through Mexico when he was hit by a train in Colonia Pascualitos, Mexicali, Mexico on 21 July.

Missing Migrants Project data are compiled by IOM staff but come from a variety of sources, some of which are unofficial. To learn more about how data on migrants’ deaths and disappearances are collected, click here.  

For latest arrivals and fatalities in the Mediterranean, please visit: http://migration.iom.int/europe
Learn more about the Missing Migrants Project at: http://missingmigrants.iom.int

For more information, please contact:
Joel Millman at IOM HQ, Tel: +41 79 103 8720, Email: jmillman@iom.int
Flavio Di Giacomo, IOM Coordination Office for the Mediterranean, Italy, Tel: +39 347 089 8996, Email: fdigiacomo@iom.int
Hicham Hasnaoui, IOM Morocco, Tel: + 212 5 37 65 28 81, Email: hhasnaoui@iom.int
Atigoni Avgeropoulou, IOM Greece, Tel: +30 210 99 19 040 (Ext. 166), Mobile: +30 69 48 92 98 09, Email: aavgeropoulou@iom.int
Kelly Namia, IOM Greece, Tel: +30 210 991 2174, Email: knamia@iom.int
Ivona Zakoska, IOM Regional DTM, Austria, Tel: +43 1 5812222, Email: izakoska@iom.int
Julia Black, IOM GMDAC, Germany, Tel: +49 30 278 778 27, Email: jblack@iom.int
Christine Petré, IOM Libya, Tel: +216 29 240 448, Email: chpetre@iom.int
Ana Dodevska, IOM Spain, Tel: +34 91 445 7116, Email: adodevska@iom.int
Myriam Chabbi, IOM Tunisia, Mobile: +216 28 78 78 05, Tel: +216 71 860 312 (Ext. 109), Email: mchabbi@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, August 7, 2018 - 14:50Image: Region-Country: SwitzerlandDefault: Multimedia:  Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

Netherlands, IOM Partner to Provide Opportunities for Youth in Conflict-Affected Areas of Iraq

Tue, 08/07/2018 - 09:01

Baghdad – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, and the Government of the Netherlands have signed a strategic partnership agreement this past week to provide livelihood and psychosocial support to Iraqi youth in crisis-affected areas and to assist the Government of Iraq in addressing challenges related to migration management.

Funded by the Dutch Ministry for Foreign Affairs, the EUR 3.5 million, 18-month project aims to support the Iraqi Government to manage migration in a safe and orderly manner and to promote durable solutions for internally displaced persons and communities of return, through improved standards of living, sustainable livelihoods and employment, and cohesive communities.

“Through this partnership with IOM, we are pleased to support the Government of Iraq in their effort to enhance stabilization and social cohesion in conflict-affected territories and to tackle the root causes of irregular migration,” said Marielle Geraedts, Chargé d’Affairs from the Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in Baghdad.

“By helping Iraq on these issues, we hope that young Iraqis will see a brighter future in Iraq,” added Geraedts. The new partnership fits within the designation of Iraq as a focus country for Dutch foreign policy assistance.

The project, which is part of a larger partnership between IOM in Iraq and the Government of the Netherlands, will provide young Iraqis with opportunities to play a stabilizing role in their communities, enhancing their economical capacities as well as their role as peace and confidence builders. This will be achieved through psychosocial and livelihood support, including vocational training, job placement and business development support.

Livelihood and psychosocial support go hand-in-hand in achieving durable solutions to displacement, including return and reintegration in Iraq’s post-conflict era.

In addition to this, IOM and the Netherlands will support the Government of Iraq to analyse the migration context in Iraq and identify gaps and recommendations, which could inform the further development of evidence-based migration policies.

While the project’s geographical coverage will be nation-wide, including the Kurdistan Region, the governorates of Anbar, Baghdad, and Kirkuk will receive special focus as they were heavily affected by the conflict, and subsequent displacement and return.

“As displaced families continue to return to their cities and villages, it is now more crucial than ever to support and facilitate the livelihood of young men and women, as they are the backbone of Iraqi families,” said Gerard Waite, IOM Iraq Chief of Mission.

Following the eruption of conflict in Iraq in 2014 in which ISIL seized a vast swath of Iraq, around six million people were displaced, while more than 1.9 million Iraqis are still living in displacement, according to IOM Iraq’s Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM).

For more information, please contact Sandra Black in IOM Iraq, Tel: +964 751 234 2550, Email: sblack@iom.int 

Language English Posted: Tuesday, August 7, 2018 - 14:45Image: Region-Country: IraqDefault: Multimedia: 

Marielle Geraedts, Chargé d’Affairs, Embassy of the Netherlands in Baghdad and IOM Chief of Mission in Iraq, Gerard Waite sign agreement. Photo: IOM

Some of the participants in livelihoods / job training programmes in Iraq. Photo: IOM 

Some of the participants in livelihoods / job training programmes in Iraq. Photo: IOM 

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

IOM Completes First Road to Massive Displacement Settlement in Haiti

Tue, 08/07/2018 - 08:51

Port-au-Prince – IOM, the UN Migration Agency in Haiti has completed the first road to Canaan, a fringe, partial internally displaced persons community that formed after the 2010 earthquake. The road will benefit approximately 200,000 Haitians currently living in Canaan, most of them with no access to electricity, toilets, essential amenities or state services. This new infrastructure will facilitate access to jobs, schools, and hospitals located outside the community.

Canaan is a tree-less district located on the outskirts of Port-au-Prince. The community is situated off a national highway, Route 1, wedged between salt flats, dry mountains, and the country’s largest waste transformation plant.

In February 2015, USAID and its funding partners embarked on a two-year long, approximately USD 14 million programme aimed at upgrading conditions for the Canaan community. They consulted with the Unité de Construction de Logements et de Bâtiments Publics (UCLBP, Office of the Prime Minister) to support the Government of Haiti’s vision to promote equitable and resilient urban development in the Canaan zone and funded IOM to assist in programme implementation.

IOM Haiti was funded to oversee the construction of 1.3 km of concrete roadway, and the work was completed in the last week of July 2018. Handover to the Ministry of Public Works, Transportation and Communication (MPTPC) with IOM and the construction firm for the road occurred on 27 July 2018, and the formal inauguration will be scheduled in the upcoming weeks. The road was designed for a 20-year lifespan with a significant drainage system following UN-Habitat hydraulic studies for the Canaan area.

“Beyond the objectives of improving and contributing to the development of the Canaan area, this successful project will re-connect and integrate the communities affected by displacement to the urban and social environment and finally make the population ‘visible’ and recognizable,” said Bernard Lami,  IOM Haiti Acting Chief of Mission.

The 1.3 km of the Canaan 3 road starts at the Boukambou canal (Bon Repos Community Hospital) and connects with a segment of path paved by the non-profit organization Global Communities. It now stretches all the way down to National Road 3. The complete loop built by IOM and Global Communities with co-funding from the American Red Cross and USAID creates a strategic roadway connecting Canaan to National Roads 1 and 3.

This segment was identified as a strategic entryway into a densely populated part of Canaan by both the UCLBP and UN-Habitat in their Urban Plan of the Canaan area which was also funded by USAID. The design of this intervention has required close technical coordination between multiple stakeholders including Global Communities, the American Red Cross, MTPTC and the Municipality of Croix-des-Bouquets.

“One kilometre might seem not significant until you observe the impact this road has had on changing people’s lives by providing them dignity and hope for the revitalization of Canaan – their neighbourhood,” said project manager Maria Oliveira Ramos, Head of IOM Haiti’s Urban Development and Engineering Unit.

For more information, please contact Emily Bauman at IOM Haiti, Tel: +509 3783 5424, Email: EBauman@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, August 7, 2018 - 14:40Image: Region-Country: HaitiDefault: Multimedia: 

The road will benefit approx. 200,000 Haitians currently living in Canaan, most of them with no access to electricity, toilets, essential amenities or state services. Photo: IOM/Emily Bauman 

Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

IOM Helps Ethiopian Migrants, Somali Refugees Return Home from War-torn Yemen

Tue, 08/07/2018 - 08:50
Language English

Yemen – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, continues to help migrants, including refugees, stranded in Yemen return home, with its latest voluntary humanitarian return support taking place this week (04-05/08). One movement left from Hudaydah with 132 Ethiopian migrants and the second from Aden with 116 Somali refugees.

For three years, the conflict in Yemen has been taking a toll on both Yemenis and migrants. For migrants, the escalation of violence in Hudaydah in June meant being stranded in Yemen longer than they wanted as IOM’s Voluntary Humanitarian Return (VHR) programming was temporarily stopped from the city’s port. However, improvement in the security situation allowed movements from Hudaydah to resume in mid-July.

IOM transported the 132 Ethiopian migrants – 96 men, 19 women and 17 unaccompanied children, of which 10 were boys and seven girls – by bus from Sana’a to Hudaydah city, where they spent the night in a secure location. The next day (04/08), IOM brought the migrants to the port from which they left to voluntarily return home to Ethiopia via Djibouti.

Nearly 100,000 Yemenis have been displaced by the ongoing instability in Hudaydah. To support the displaced community, IOM is providing food to 500 people a day and medical assistance to 200 people a day.

“Despite the difficult environment in Hudaydah, IOM has been assisting migrants and the internally displaced population,” said Sarat Dash, IOM Chief of Mission in Yemen. “IOM is distributing food and water and providing medical assistance. Meals are being provided at IOM’s Migrants Response Point and in four schools in Al Marawa. We are also providing food baskets and materials to build shelters to displaced people not lucky enough to be hosted in a school,” said Dash.

The day after the Ethiopian movement (05/08), IOM in coordination with UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, helped 116 Somalis refugees depart from Aden to return home. The group comprised 48 men, 29 women, 19 boys and 20 girls. This group was assisted through the Assisted Spontaneous Return programme (ASR) for Somali refugees in Yemen, which is carried out in close collaboration with the Yemeni Authority, Somali National Commission for Refugees and Internally Displaced Persons (NCRI) and the Somali Consulate.

So far in 2018, IOM has helped 615 stranded migrants return home from Yemen on IOM’s voluntary humanitarian return (VHR) programme, and 1,321 refugees out of Aden were helped under the Assisted Spontaneous Return (ASR) programme.

For more information, please contact Saba Malme at IOM Yemen, Tel: + 967 736 800 329, Email: smalme@iom.int

Posted: Tuesday, August 7, 2018 - 14:36Image: Region-Country: YemenDefault: Press Release Type: Global
Categories: PBN

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